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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (78 total).

Bogenschneider K, Small S, Riley D. n.d.. An ecological, risk-focused approach for addressing youth-at-risk issues. Chevy Chase, MD: National 4-H Center, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a prevention model to reduce problem behavior in adolescents by identifying risk factors and protective factors in an adolescent's environment and targeting gaps between the two at all stages of the adolescent's environmental system—individual, family, peers, school, work, and community. The paper reviews current research on risk and protective factors that influence the well being of youth and suggests implications of this research for developing comprehensive community based prevention programs.

Contact: National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 961-2800 E-mail: info@fourhcouncil.edu Web Site: http://www.fourhcouncil.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Community programs, Environmental influences, Models, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2017. Focus on prevention: Strategies and programs to prevent substance use. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 59 pp.

Annotation: This guide aims to help groups and communities move from concerns about abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs to practical ways to get the word out about prevention. It provides a brief discussion and starting points for these focus topics: the strategic prevention framework, prevention theory, risk and protection, community needs, strategies that work, issues and audiences, community partners, connecting with your audience, social marketing, media and social media, and evaluation. A suggested event timeline and sample materials are provided to help develop a successful news conference, and a list of substance abuse prevention resources is included. A Spanish language version is also available from the publisher.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: DHHS Pub. no. (SMA) 10-4120.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Communities, Drug abuse, Evaluation, Media campaigns, Prevention, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Jensen F. 2017. The power of the adolescent brain. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video (30 min.) (Think, Act, Grow (TAG) Talks)

Annotation: This video shares what researchers have learned about adolescent brain development, functioning, and capacity. It explains the strengths and potential of the adolescent brain; addresses learning, risk behavior, addiction, and mental health issues; and provides practical suggestions for families with adolescents. The video is available as a full-length (30 minute) program, as well as in short, individual segments, and is accompanied by citations, additional resources, a guide to technical terms, and discussion guides for professionals and family members.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Child development, Families, Health promotion, Mental health, Protective factors, Resources for professionals, Risk taking

Wilson-Simmons R, Jiang Y, Aratani Y. 2017. Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors that promote or hinder children's healthy development, drawing on recent studies to illustrate the importance of parent resiliency in the development of social-emotional competence among children from families with low incomes. The report concludes with program and policy recommendations that have proven effective in promoting the development of protective factors, reducing vulnerabilities, and cultivating resiliency among parents with low incomes and, consequently, their children.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Competence, Coping, Emotional development, Low income groups, Mental health, Parenting skills, Parents, Policy development, Program development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Vulnerability

Compton R, Doherty M, Foley M, Kaminski S, Lieberman M, Monopoli M, Whitaker ME. 2016–. DentaQuest disease management series. Westborough, MA: DentaQuest Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This course provides guidance on implementing a prevention-focused approach to managing dental caries and periodontal disease in a practice-based setting. The course comprises eight 30- to 40-minute modules. Topics include dental caries risk assessment, perinatal oral health care, managing dental caries in infants and young children from birth to age 5 and throughout the life span, and transitioning a traditional oral health practice to a prevention-focused practice.

Contact: DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: http://www.dentaquestpartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Children, Continuing education, Dental caries, Disease management, Infants, Learning, Oral health, Perinatal health, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Risk assessment, Training

U.S. Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway, FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. 2016. Building community, building hope: 2016 prevention resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Familes, 104 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. It focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Topics include implementing a protective factors approach, working with families using protective factors, and using protective factors as a framework for community partnerships. Contents include tools and strategies to assist service providers in integrating protective factors into community programs and systems. Tips sheets for parents and caregivers are provided.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Community programs, Consumer education materials, Families, Program improvement, Protective factors, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Service delivery systems, Systems development, Youth

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

Iowa Department of Public Health, Bureau of Oral and Health Delivery Systems. 2016. The burden of oral disease 2016. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, Bureau of Oral and Health Delivery Systems, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document reports the burden of oral disease in Iowa through a series of seven fact sheets. Each fact sheet provides a snapshot of the status of oral health and oral disease for the following groups: young children, children, children and youth with special health care needs, adolescents, adults, and older adults. Topics include oral conditions, risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing oral diseases, and protective factors that work to prevent them. Iowa-specific data and oral health programs are also described.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, Bureau of Oral and Health Delivery Systems, Lucas State Office Building, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 242-6383 Secondary Telephone: (866) 528-4020 Fax: (515) 242-6384 Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov/ohds Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental care, Disease prevention, Health status, Iowa, Life course, Oral disease, Oral health, Population surveillance, Protective factors, Risk factors, State programs, Statistical data

Holicky A. 2016. Florida's burden of oral disease surveillance report (upd.). Tallahassee, FL: Florida Department of Health, Public Health Dental Program, 62 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information on the burden of oral disease in Florida, highlights oral health disparities associated with specific populations, and describes resources and programs for improving oral health. Topics include state and national objectives, the societal and economic impact of oral disease, risk and protective factors, work force capacity and diversity, and use of oral health care.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, Public Health Dental Program, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin A14, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1724, Telephone: (850) 245-4333 Web Site: http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/community-health/dental-health/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Disease prevention, Florida, Health disparities, Health objectives, Health services delivery, Health status, Infants, Life course, Low income groups, Older adults, Oral health, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Prevalence, Program improvement, Protective factors, Risk factors, Special health care needs, State initiatives, State programs, Statistical data, Work force

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

Woolf SH, Aron L, Chapman DA, Dubay L, Zimerman E, Snellings LC, Hall L, Haley AD, Holla N, Ayers K, Lowenstein C, Waidmann TA. 2016. The health of the states: How U.S. states compare in health status and the factors that shape health–Summary report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying supplemental reports, present findings on the status of Americans' health at the state level, along with the diverse factors associated with health. The report examines how state-level variations in health outcomes correlate with variations in factors thought to shape or influence health (health determinants) from five domains including health behaviors, health systems, economic and social factors, physical and social environmental factors, and public policies and social spending. Contents include research and policy priorities emerging from the analysis. Maps and charts are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Decision making, Economics, Geographic factors, Health behaviors, Health status, Health systems, Life course, Protective factors, Public policy, Risk factors, Social factors

U.S. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. 2016. Public health 3.0: A call to action to create a 21st public health infrastructure. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from regional dialogues about a renewed approach to public health and presents recommendations for realizing the vision for all communities in the United States. The recommendations are organized in the following five themes: strong leadership and work force; strategic partnerships; flexible and sustainable funding; timely and locally relevant data, metrics, and analytics; and foundational infrastructure. Examples from the following five communities are included: California Accountable Communities for Health; Kansas City, Missouri; Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; Nashville, Tennessee; and Spokane, Washington.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 715-G, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 690-7694 E-mail: ash@hhs.gov Web Site: https://www.hhs.gov/ash Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Data analysis, Data collection, Equal opportunities, Financing, Health status, Leadership, Local initiatives, Measures, Models, Protective factors, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, Strategic planning, Sustainability, Work force

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.