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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Children's asthma management: Partnering to improve clinical training. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Enhancing Care for Children with Asthma Project, a partnership to improve health outcomes for children with asthma by supporting the implementation of nationally recognized asthma-care guidelines at physician offices, federally qualified community health centers, school-based clinics, and other primary care clinics. Topics include establishing collective focus, using data, reaching providers, and gauging opportunities to improve pediatric asthma management in states.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Children, Disease management, Guidelines, Outreach, Patient care management, Primary care facilities, Program improvement, Public private partnerships

McDonald KM, Schutz E, Albin L, Pineda N, Lonhart J, Sundaram V, Smith-Spangler C, Brustrom J, Malcolm E. 2010. Care coordination measures atlas. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 280 pp.

Annotation: This atlas lists existing measures of care coordination and presents a framework for understanding care coordination measurement. The atlas is designed to help evaluators identify appropriate measures for assessing care coordination interventions in research studies and demonstration projects, particularly those measures focusing on care coordination in ambulatory care. The atlas explains what care coordination is; provides various perspectives on it; and includes examples of care coordination scenarios. It also describes how to lay out information about care coordination using a measure mapping table developed to show the intersection of care coordination domains and measurement perspectives. Appendices include measure mapping procedures, examples of measure mapping, sources for identifying measures, and guidelines on measurement selection.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Ambulatory care facilities, Evaluation, Health care systems, Measures, Primary care, Service coordination

U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care. 2008. Health centers: America's primary care safety net—Reflections on successes, 2002-2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the U.S. health center program history; the role in providing a health care home; the model of care used; and how connections are sustained between primary care associations, offices, and other partners. It also describes the unprecedented growth of the health center program from 2002 to 2007 and outlines future issues in work force, health information technology, emergency management, quality, and performance measurement. Program successes are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 489-4772 Fax: (301) 480-4098 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/about/organization/bureaus/bphc/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community health centers, National programs, Primary care facilities, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public health services

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office on Early Childhood. 1998. Starting Early Starting Smart: Early childhood collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office on Early Childhood, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document reports the progress of the "Starting Early Starting Smart" (SESS) programs, a child-centered, family-focused, and community-based initiative that is a collaboration between the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Administration for Children and Families, the Department of Education, the National Institutes of Health, and the Casey Family Program. The program focuses on addressing the needs of young children (birth to age seven) who are at high risk for developing substance abuse or mental health-related problems due to adverse situations. It is an outgrowth of the Knowledge Development and Application (KDA) collaboration approach to improving community based health services. Contents of the report include a diagram of the KDA process; a description of the SESS program; comments of collaborating partners; a list of SESS study sites; a map of SESS study sites; a chart identifying intervention strategies; expected outcomes from the SESS programs; profiles of primary care and early childhood study sites; and a press release announcing the selection of the grant recipients/study sites.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Contact E-mail: info@samhsa.gov Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Children, Community, Community based services, Community health services, Early intervention services, Families, Federal programs, Infants, Mental health services, Primary care facilities, Public private partnerships, Substance abuse prevention

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 1997. Health information technology: Self-assessment tool for primary health care providers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 172 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides a self-assessment tool for primary health care providers to determine if they and their facilities have a need to increase their information technology level so their organizations become more efficient. It covers all aspects of the organization, including scheduling, claims processing, records, and marketing. The tool is also designed to help health care providers create a request for proposal (RFP) to vendors so they more accurately determine a facility's need for increased technology. It is largely divided into 10 steps: 1) administrative site/satellites, 2) functional process map, 3) process dimension, 4) physical space, 5) projections of change, 6) the compelling salesperson, 7) the discovery RFP, 8) cost/benefit analysis, 9) the final RFP, and 10) results analysis. Appendices include sample RFP's, employee readiness surveys, sample status reports, and definitions of terms.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Health facility administrators, Health facility planning, Information networks, Information services, Information systems, Needs assessment, Primary care facilities, Requests for proposals, Self evaluation, Technology

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Casy Family Program. 1997. Cooperative agreements for integrating mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services with primary health care service settings or with early childhood service settings, for children ages birth to 7 and their families/caregivers = Starting early starting smart. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 124 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for grant applicants to a Healthy People 2000 program of the United States Public Health Service (PHS). The Starting Early Starting Smart program is a collaborative effort to test the effectiveness for children ages birth to seven and their families and caregivers of integrating mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services with primary health care service settings and/or with early childhood service settings. The first section of the document consists of programmatic guidance: a program description; eligibility criteria; availability of funds; period of support; special considerations and requirements; application procedures; the review process; review criteria; and terms and conditions of support. The second section encompasses specific instructions and samples for both the narrative and the forms of the application.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Contact E-mail: info@samhsa.gov Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Children, Families, Federal grants, Foundations, Grants, Infants, Mental health services, Primary care facilities, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Substance abuse prevention

Frush K, Cinoman M, Bailey B, Hohenhaus S. [1996]. Office preparedness for pediatric emergencies provider manual. [Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services], 49 pp.

Annotation: This manual, which is part of the workshop entitled "Office Preparedness for Pediatric Emergencies, " is intended to educate pediatric primary care providers so they are prepared to provide emergency medical services for children (EMSC) in their offices if the need arises. The first chapter explains how office staff including receptionists can identify an emergency. The second chapter discusses contacting regular EMSC services. The third chapter has some mock codes to run in the office. The fourth chapter is protocols for office emergencies. The fifth chapter discusses teaching families to handle emergencies at home until help arrives. The last sections of the manual have an office equipment list, an office medications list, a mock code log form, emergency drug doses, and a mock code evaluation form. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Codes, Drug dosages, Emergency medical services for children, Families, Life support care, Manuals, Medicine, North Carolina, Physicians' offices, Planning, Primary care facilities, Protocols

Frush,K, Cinoman M, Bailey B, Hohenhaus S. [1996]. Office preparedness for pediatric emergencies instructor manual. [Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services], 27 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended for instructors who are teaching the workshop entitled "Office Preparedness for Pediatric Emergencies." The goal of the workshop is to improve integration of primary care providers into the North Carolina Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) system by enhancing provider pediatric emergency skills and familiarity with EMSC. The manual begins by describing instructor qualifications and the instructor role in individual office workshops or in multi-practice or conference workshops. It includes mock codes to demonstrate. Appendices contain ten forms or sample letters. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Codes, Emergency medical services for children, Manuals, North Carolina, Physicians' offices, Planning, Primary care facilities, Trainers

U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, Division of Community and Migrant Health. 1992. Clinical data collection and retrieval system for small primary care projects. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, Division of Community and Migrant Health, 61 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides information on designing, implementing, and evaluating clinical information systems for small primary health care centers. It discusses manual and automated systems. The manual discusses determining information needs, basic patient information, monitoring health care center activity, identifying special patient characteristics, system components for tracking and recall, monitoring specific aspects of patient care, criteria for automating information systems, and information software. It provides examples of various cards and logs.

Contact: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 489-4772 Fax: (301) 480-4098 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/about/organization/bureaus/bphc/index.html Available in libraries.

Keywords: Health care systems, Information systems, Patient care, Patient identification systems, Primary care facilities, Software

Kaufman M, Watkins EL, comps. 1981. Promoting comprehensive integrated health care with emphasis on nutrition care and social work services. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Public Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This booklet was produced subsequent to a national workshop on Nutrition and Social Work in Primary Care Services, Arlington, Virginia, May 31-June 3, 1981. The event was co-sponsored with the National Association of Community Health Care Centers and the National Rural Primary Care Association. Sixty-eight administrators, nutritionists and social workers from primary health care centers, state and local health departments, and central and regional offices of the Department of Health and Human Services participated in the discussions. This workshop was a first step directed toward strengthening nutrition and social work services in primary care and facilitating closer working relationships between local and state health departments, primary health care centers, and the Federal government. This report summarizes the issues and barriers in providing nutrition and social work services, and the actions recommended to improve services in primary health care programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Collaboration, Community health centers, Interagency cooperation, Nutrition services, Primary care, Primary care facilities, Service delivery, Social work

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.