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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (54 total).

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. Preeclampsia: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force,

Annotation: This resource presents the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The recommendation statement; supporting documents, including the research plan, evidence review, evidence summary, clinical summary; and related information for health professionals.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Evidence based medicine, Hospitals, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Screening, Women's health

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2015. Prenatal drug use and newborn health: Federal efforts need better planning and coordination. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office,

Annotation: This report provides information on how federal agencies have addressed opioid use by pregnant women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Topics include federally funded research, federal programs, and other federal agency efforts related to prenatal opioid use or NAS; gaps identified by federal agency officials and experts in efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS; and how federal efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS are planned and coordinated.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Federal agencies, Infant health, Newborn infants, Prenatal influences, Prevention, Program coordination, Program development, Program planning, Referrals, Research, Screening, Substance use

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

Ohio Department of Health. (2013). Preventing infant mortality. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on efforts to prevent infant mortality in Ohio. It provides information about the Ohio Department of Health's (ODH's) safe sleep campaign, its progesterone prematurity project, its prenatal smoking-cessation initiative, and its decision to add severe combined immune deficiency and critical congenital heart disease to its list of newborn screening items. ODH's project to reduce elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation, its institute for equity in birth outcomes, and its support for select communities to participate in an initiative to improve black infant mortality and prematurity rates are also discussed.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal screening, Ohio, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention services, Public awareness campaigns, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives

National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics. 2012. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) factsheet. [Lutherville, MD]: National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a procedure to analyze cell-free fetal DNA circulating in maternal blood as a noninvasive prenatal screening and testing effort for trisomy 21 and other fetal chromosome abnormalities. It outlines test characteristics, detection rate and accuracy, reporting results and their implications for pregnant women, testing costs and insurance coverage, what to ask laboratories offering the test, performance comparison to other forms of prenatal testing or screening, counseling women about screening and testing options, and general background.

Contact: National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 2360 West Joppa Road, Suite 320, Lutherville, MD 21093, Telephone: (410) 583-0600 Fax: (410) 583-0520 E-mail: info@nchpeg.org Web Site: http://www.nchpeg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Down syndrome, Genetic screening, Prenatal care, Trisomy

Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange. 2012. Violence and pregnancy: Screening, resources, and referrals—Provider guide Washington State. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for health care providers in Washington state offers tips and advice for screening for violence among pregnant patients. It provides information on confidentiality, referral resources, as well as organizations for providers to gather more information and screening guidelines.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Interpersonal violence, Physician patient relations, Pregnant women, Prenatal screening, Resources for professionals, Washington

Humphrey JR, Floyd RL. 2012. Preconception health and health care environmental scan: Report on clinical screening tools and interventions. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides the results of an environmental scan to identify preconception or interconception screening tools and brief interventions that had been previously evaluated. It describes the methodology of the scan and describes 15 unique tools and interventions identified in the scan.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Intervention, Literature reviews, Preconception care, Prenatal screening

Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, Prenatal Testing Committee. 2011. Laboratory testing during pregnancy: Recommendations of the WAPC Prenatal Testing Committee (4th ed.). Madison, WI: Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward clinicians, offers recommendations on specific laboratory tests that should be considered during the course of prenatal care and describes the circumstances under which the tests should be performed. The report also provides detailed information about a wide range of prenatal screens and tests.

Contact: Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, McConnell Hall, 1010 Mound Street, Madison, WI 53715, Telephone: (608) 417-6060 Fax: 608/267-6089 E-mail: wapc@perinatalweb.org Web Site: http://www.perinatalweb.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Prenatal care, Prenatal screening, Screening tests, Wisconsin

Vermont Child Health Improvement Program. 2011. Practice toolkit for improving prenatal care. [Burlington, VT]: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont Department of Pediatrics, var. pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, for health care professionals in Vermont, provides evidence-based care topics for improving the health and prenatal care of pregnant women. It describes the Improving Prenatal Care in Vermont (IPCV) project and identifies "best practice" prenatal guidelines and assists obstetric service providers in incorporating these guidelines in to their office systems. Topics include practice assessment, patient satisfaction, tobacco cessation, nutrition, breastfeeding readiness, gestational diabetes, psychosocial/behavioral, substance abuse, intimate partner violence, depression, preterm labor, infectious disease, environmental exposure, and genetic screening. This is a companion document to the "State Guide for Improving Prenatal Care".

Contact: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Josephs 7, UHC Campus, One South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, Telephone: (802) 656-8210 Fax: (802) 656-8368 Web Site: http://www.med.uvm.edu/vchip Available from the website.

Keywords: Genetic screening, Guidelines, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Resources for professionals, Sexually transmitted diseases, State programs, Vermont

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH). 2011. Integration of mental health and substance abuse services for women of reproductive age in clinical and hospital settings . Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, 1 video. (60 min.). (Webinar #1 of six)

Annotation: This webinar focuses on screening and treating women of reproductive age, particularly those who are planning a pregnancy, are pregnant or are new mothers, for mental health and substance abuse issues. Program examples of in- and out-patient services at the UNC Healthcare System are discussed including a perinatal mood disorders clinic, a psychiatric nurse practitioner to the prenatal clinic, and supporting an in-patient psychiatric unit for pregnant women. Also discussed are two UNC out-patient programs (Beacon and Horizons) that provide services to women with substance abuse, domestic violence, and mental health concerns. This program is available for continuing education credits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 170 Rosenau Hall, CB #5400, 135 Dauer Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, E-mail: sphcomm@listserv.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.sph.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Continuing education, Distance education, MCH training programs, Mental health, Postpartum care, Postpartum depression, Preconception care, Prenatal education, Prevention services, Screening, Substance abuse prevention, Women's health services

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, Office for Continuing Education. 2011. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) webinar series. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health,

Annotation: This distance learning project consists of six webinars focusing on screening and treating women of reproductive age, particularly those who are planning a pregnancy, are pregnant, or are new mothers, for mental health and substance abuse issues. Series objectives include: increasing knowledge of the key chronic disease, substance abuse and mental health issues that impact women of reproductive age; increasing understanding of the systems issues and priorities involved in providing a continuum of care from prevention through disease management; describing partnership opportunities in addressing chronic disease, mental health and substance abuse issues; describing effective strategies to bridge the categorical structures of mental health, public health, and primary care; describing leadership opportunities for addressing these issues from a variety of approaches, including policy, systems, and primary prevention. Each webinar includes a definition of the problem, including the impact on a variety of racial/ethnic groups; descriptions of strategies that can be deployed to address the problem; descriptions of challenges to full implementation of best practice approaches; discussions about key partners and allies around this issue, including differing perspectives, approaches, and roles; and a call to action and leadership opportunities. This program is available for continuing education credits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Continuing education, Distance education, MCH training programs, Mental health, Preconception care, Prenatal education, Prevention services, Screening, Substance abuse prevention, Women's health services

Fajnzylber E, Hotz VJ, Sanders SG. 2010. An economic model of amniocentesis choice. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 41 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16306)

Annotation: This paper examines the logic behind the typical recommendation by medical practitioners that only pregnant women over the age of 35 be tested for Down syndrome and other genetic disorders using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) since these tests can cause miscarriage. The authors argue that such logic is incomplete, since the cost of such testing rises with age, just as the benefit does: While undergoing an amniocentesis always entails the risk of miscarriage of a healthy fetus, these costs are lower at early ages, because there is a higher probability of being able to replace a miscarried fetus with a healthy birth at a later age. In this paper, the authors present an economic model of amniocentesis choice to explore this tradeoff.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Amniocentesis, Chorionic villi sampling, Cost effectiveness, Economic factors, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Guidelines, Maternal age, Prenatal screening

Barry KL, Caetano R, Chang G, DeJoseph MC, Miller LA, O'Connor MJ, Olson, HC, Floyd RL, Weber MK, DeStefano F, Dolina S, Leeks K. 2009. Reducing alcohol-exposed pregnancies: A Report of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect. Atlanta, GA: National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies community-level fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) interventions and policies that can prevent fetal alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEDs) and reduce the prevalence of physical, mental, behavioral, and learning disabilities due to prenatal alcohol exposure. Topics also include an epidemiological overview, screening for women at risk, current evidence, prevention interventions, and recommendations and future research directions.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol, Early intervention, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Ranji U, Salganicoff A, Stewart AM, Cox M, Doamekpor L. 2009. State Medicaid coverage of perinatal services: Summary of state survey findings. Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights findings from the 2007/2008 State Survey of Reproductive Health Services Under Medicaid. The report examines state Medicaid program policies regarding coverage of pregnancy-related services. It details state-level Medicaid eligibility and enrollment policies for pregnant women, as well as scope of coverage for prenatal and screening services, delivery and postpartum care, educational classes, and support services.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Eligibility, Enrollment, Health services, Low income groups, Medicaid, Parent education programs, Parent support services, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Programs, Reproductive health, Screening tests, Women's health

Chavkin W, Rosenbaum S, Jones J, Rosenfeld A. [2008]. Women's health and health care reform: The key role of comprehensive reproductive health care. New York, NY: Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the role of reproductive care in women's health throughout the lifespan. The report calls for a health reform agenda that links prenatal, family planning, and medical care for women; ensures that Americans receive accurate health information and are assured of confidentiality; and links reproductive health care with screening and follow-up for health needs later in life. The report discusses healthy pregnancy, health during the reproductive years, noncontraceptive benefits of contraception, and reforming women's reproductive health.

Contact: Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, Allan Rosenfeld Building, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032-2603, Telephone: (212) 305-4797 Fax: (212) 305-1460 Web Site: http://www.mailman.hs.columbia.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Confidentiality, Contraception, Family planning, Health care, Health care reform, Infant health, Older adults, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Screening, Women's health

FASD Regional Training Centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. [2008]. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Competency-based curriculum development guide for medical and allied health education and practice. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ca. 280 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This purpose of this curriculum development guide is to enhance the knowledge and skills of health care providers to recognize and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders by aiding in the development of educational programs and materials. The guide is organized by three types of learning outcomes: competencies, learning goals, and learning objectives, allowing educators or trainers to select goals and objectives appropriate for participants' learning needs and skill levels, along with university or organization criteria. Chapter contents include seven competency topics: foundation; screening and brief interventions; models of addiction; biological effects of alcohol on the fetus; screening, diagnosis, and assessment of FAS; treatment across the lifespan for persons with FASDs; and ethical, legal, and policy issues.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prenatal addiction, Prenatal care, Professional education, Resources for professionals, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2008–. You Quit, Two Quit. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to support comprehensive tobacco use screening and cessation counseling for pregnant and postpartum women, with a focus on women with low incomes, new mothers, and recidivism prevention. Contents include information and resources for pregnant women, mothers, and families on topics such as the benefits of quitting, facts about quitting, plan to quit tobacco, getting support, and providing support. Information and resources for health professionals address topics such as an evidence-based tobacco counseling approach, tobacco facts, documentation forms, billing and reimbursement, patient education, provider education, and standing orders for tobacco cessation counseling. A practice bulletin, research, and reports and guidelines are also provided.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, High risk mothers, Low income groups, Perinatal health, Postpartum care, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, Screening, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

President's Council on Bioethics. 2008. Reproduction and responsibility: The regulation of new biotechnologies. Washington, DC: President's Council on Bioethics, 252 pp.

Annotation: This report examines policies and practices of biotechnology related to assisted reproduction and reviews the regulatory policies and practices involved in screening and selecting for genetic conditions and traits; modification of traits and characteristics; research involving in vitro human embryos; and commercial and financial interests in this arena. For each topic, the report reviews the relevant techniques and practices, the principal ethical issues, the existing regulatory activities, who currently provides oversight and guidance in each area, pursuant to what authority, according to what principles and values, and with what ultimate practical effect. The report concludes with findings based on the examination described above and a discussion of possible policy recommendations.

Contact: President's Council on Bioethics, 1425 New York Avenue, N.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-4669 E-mail: info@bioethics.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Biotechnology, Embryo, Ethics, Genetic screening, Government, Prenatal screening, Public policy, Reproductive technologies

National Alliance for Hispanic Health. 2008. Prenatal care: Helping you have a healthy baby. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 58 pp.

Annotation: This publication discusses the importance of prenatal care, what to expect during a prenatal care visit, and the tests and exams that pregnant women can expect to receive. It also provides guidelines to prevent or eliminate common discomforts during pregnancy; describes the factors that could complicate pregnancy, and important things to consider after the birth of the baby such as breastfeeding, physical changes during the postpartum period, and family spacing. Each page includes text in both English and Spanish.

Contact: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 1501 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1401, Telephone: (202) 387-5000 Secondary Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Guidelines, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal screening, Spanish language materials

Ruffin J, Pettiford B. [2007]. Healthy Start - Northeastern North Carolina Baby Love Plus: Family violence program—Impact report. Raleigh, NC: Women's and Children's Health Section, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, 221 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a Healthy Start program in five rural Northeastern North Carolina counties from June 2002 through May 2006 to address and reduce family violence during and around the time of pregnancy. Topics include enhancing perinatal family violence screening and intervention, improving the referral network between local health departments and are family violence programs, improving case management of prenatal clients experiencing physical or emotional violence, enhancing perinatal outreach and client recruitment efforts, improving multidisciplinary health education, and training around family violence and women's support issues, and enhancing community commitment to eradicating family violence. Contents include a description of family violence during pregnancy in the area, a summary of goals and objectives and methodology, service coordination, and program evaluation. Results and outcomes are outlined. Appendices include sample materials developed during the project such as survey instruments and summarized answers, focus group questions and answers, sample forms used to collect data, sample policies and procedures, and sample outreach materials. . [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Final reports, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, MCH research, North Carolina, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Screening, Underserved populations, Violence prevention

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.