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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (57 total).

Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic. n.d.. Safe sleep for your special baby. Haymarket, VA: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of a premature baby discusses safe sleep practices that should be followed once the infant is discharged from the hospital. It discusses practices suitable for the NICU that are no longer needed and may be unsafe once the infant is at home. It provides tips on following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines on back sleeping, safe cribs, not covering the baby's head and face, no smoking, no overheating, talking with others who care for the baby, and tummy time for the awake infant who is closely supervised.

Contact: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, P.O. Box 799, Haymarket, VA 20168, E-mail: sidsma27@aol.com Web Site: http://www.sidsma.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Hospitals, Neonatal intensive care units, Premature infants, Prevention, SIDS

National Coalition for Infant Health. 2016. Respiratory syncytial virus. [Washington, DC]: National Coalition for Infant Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), why RSV is dangerous for premature infants, and what policymakers and others can do to reduce RSV's impact on premature infants and their families. Contents include information on the risk factors associated with RSV, how parents can protect their infants, why some infants can access preventive treatment while others cannot, RSV's impact on the health care system, and how families without preventive treatment are impacted by RSV.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Communicable disease control, Disease prevention, Health care disparities, Infant health, Policy development, Premature infants, Preventive health services, Respiratory diseases, Virus diseases

March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center. 2015. 2015 premature birth report card. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, 4 pp.

Annotation: This annual report card measures the progress in reducing the nation's preterm birth rate by comparing each state's rate to the goal. Topics include prevention strategies and recommendations. Topics include women who are uninsured, late preterm birth, women who smoke, and preterm birth rates by race and ethnicity. Indicators, definitions, and data sources for the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are included. Information about the grading methodology is also provided. State fact sheets are also available.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Ethnic factors, Premature infants, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2013. Partnering to promote follow-up care for premature infants. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 6 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This document provides a series of case studies on state models to support neonatal intensive care unit follow-up programs. The document also includes national resources for state Title V programs as they continue to develop and support similar programs. Models from the following states are described: Arizona, California, Colorado, Iowa, For each model, an overview is provided, followed by a discussion of partners and funding and successes and contact information.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, California, Case studies, Colorado, Costs, Family support services, Financing, Health services, Infant health, Iowa, Premature infants, Programs, State initiatives

Pliska ES. 2013. Preventing prematurity. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document, which focuses on preventing premature birth, provides background about the issue and discusses the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials' Healthy Babies Initiative, which aims to help state health officials and their staff improve birth outcomes by reducing infant mortality and prematurity. The article also discusses states' support for policies to reduce premature birth rates and for building awareness of their state's prematurity rates and other maternal and child health issues,state progress toward addressing prematurity and other poor birth outcomes, and roles and opportunities for grantmakers.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Grants, Infant health, Premature infants, Prematurity, Public policy, State programs

National Perinatal Association. [2012]. Multidisciplinary guidelines for the care of late preterm infants. Alexandria, VA: National Perinatal Association, 38 pp.

Annotation: This document presents guidelines for what the health care team should do in caring for late preterm infants and for specific education to be provided to the families of these infants. The guidelines are divided into four sections: (1) in-hospital assessment and care, (2) transition to outpatient care, (3), short-term follow-up care, and (4) long-term follow-up care. Within each section, the guidelines are further subdivided into four subsections: (1) stability, (2) screening, (3) safety, and (4) support. Each guideline includes recommendations for the health care team and for family education. It closes with a list of collaborative partners and endorsing organizations.

Contact: National Perinatal Association, 457 State Street, Binghampton, NY 13901, Telephone: (888) 971-3295 Fax: (703) 684-5968 E-mail: info@nationalperinatal.org Web Site: http://www.nationalperinatal.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Education, Families, Guidelines, Health care, Health services, Hospital services, Parent support services, Premature infants, Preterm birth, Safety, Screening

MedImmune Advocacy. 2012. Premature infant summit: Collaborating for preemies: Small steps...big changes—Summary meeting report. [Gaithersburg, MD]: MedImmune, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information presented during a series of summits conducted by MedImmune Advocacy to examine the key issues facing premature infants and their families. The issues highlighted include public policy; concerns about the high rate of prematurity in the United States; the educational needs of parents; late preterm health issues; and the critical continuity of care for these infants after they leave the hospital. The report includes statistics on prematurity in the United States; describes clinical issues associated with prematurity; presents late-preterm infant health resources; describes advocacy initiatives; and examines the policy landscape and its impact on premature infant care. Also included are detailed descriptions of additional tools such as a premature infant advocacy training guide, a toolkit for the follow-care of premature infants, and a premature infant health website.

Contact: PreemieVoices.com, MedImmune Advocacy, 101 Orchard Ridge Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, Telephone: (301) 398-0000 Web Site: http://preemievoices.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Meetings, Premature infants, Prematurity, Reports

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Improving birth outcomes in the U.S.: State efforts to reduce prematurity. [Washington, DC]: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 62 pp.

Annotation: These presentation slides provide examples of how states can move forward in achieving the goal of prematurity reduction. The webinar, held on July 12, 2012, outlines the Healthy Babies Initiative to decrease prematurity in the United States by 8 percent by 2014. Presenters highlight the experience and strategies of two states that have met the challenge goal (Alaska and Vermont) and one state currently working toward that goal (Oklahoma).

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska, Oklahoma, Premature infants, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, State initiatives, Vermont

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Vision development and the link to overall development in the premature infant. Alexandria, VA: National Premature Infant Health Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 14)

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the most prevalent and significant issues involved in eye and vision care during the growth and development of premature infants. It discusses visual development, ocular growth in prematurity, and the condition known as retinopathy of prematurity resulting from the abnormal development of blood vessels. Autism warning signs which might manifest as visual cues (for example the lack of frequent eye contact by 2-3 months) are also presented. The webinar discusses the history of infant eye care and visual screening; the importance of early intervention; the various ways to test vision in infants; and the importance of addressing potential vision problems. An overview of InfantSEE -- a public health program designed to help ensure that eye and vision care becomes an integral part of infant wellness care -- is included as part of the presentation.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Community programs, Development, Growth, Infant health, Premature infants, Retinopathy of prematurity, Vision screening

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2012. Maternal, infant, and child health. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, (Leading health indicators webinar)

Annotation: This webcast is the third installment of the monthly "Who's Leading the Leading Health Indicators?" series. The series highlights organizations using evidence-based approaches to address a Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator (LHI) topic. The webcast provides an overview of the March LHI topic—maternal, infant, and child health—and provides information about maternal, infant, and child activities in DHHS's region IV. Also discussed is how the Kentucky Department of Public health, with the help of national, state, and local partners, has successfully combatted rising rates of premature birth.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Collaboration, Federal programs, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, Infant health, Kentucky, Local programs, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prevention, State programs, Trends, Women's health

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Texas and Louisiana: Healthy Start for more infants. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report presents case studies from Texas and Louisiana that illustrate innovative approaches that states are employing to help ensure that more children get a healthy start in life. The report provides background information on the complications often resulting from premature birth and discusses the essential features of Texas's Healthy Babies Initiative and Louisiana's Birth Outcomes Initiative. Resources for more information about the programs are provided.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Initiatives, Louisiana, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Prevention, State programs, Texas

Pickett OK. 2012. Prematurity and preterm birth: Resource brief. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

MedImmune, National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality. 2011. Toolkit for the follow-up care of the premature infant. [Gaithersburg, MD]: MedImmune; [Boston, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality],

Annotation: This electronic toolkit has been developed to assist healthcare providers in the transition of the premature infant from hospital to outpatient care, to facilitate the accurate transfer of patient information, and to help provide evidence‐based practical measures for consideration in the care of the premature infant The toolkit provides age‐specific information, highlighting what is unique for the premature infant from birth to 12 months (corrected for age). Sections include discharge planning, outpatient follow‐up care, parent/caregiver, and tools. Policy statements on hospital discharge from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), anticipatory guidance, Bright Futures well-child guidance and screening tables, and listings of specific medical issues complicating outcomes or premature infants and the role of role of primary physicians are included in the online interactive toolkit.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Hospital services, Infant care, Neonatal intensive care, Outpatient services, Patient discharge, Premature infants, Prematurity, Resources for professionals, Service integration

Milwaukee Health Department. 2011. Second annual infant mortality summit: Focus on prematurity. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department,

Annotation: This website provides information about the City of Milwaukee Health Department 2nd annual infant mortality summit, which focused on prematurity. The site lists speakers and panelists, presents links to summit highlights, and lists related media.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Infant mortality, Mass media, Premature infants, State initiatives, Wisconsin

Linden DW, Paroli ET, Doron MW. 2010. Preemies: The essential guide for parents of premature babies. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Pocket Books, 633 pp.

Annotation: This book is written for expecting or new parents of premature babies. It is divided into the following sections: before birth, in the hospital, a life together, and other considerations. Before birth outlines some known causes of premature labor and birth and how to prevent them. Topics discussed in the second part include the premature delivery, the neonatal intensive care unit at the hospital, testing and possible complications that occur in the first week, settling down in the hospital, and if baby needs surgery. Part three covers decisions and preparations for taking baby home, what to expect and watch for during early development and possible consequences of prematurity. Part four talks about losing a premature baby and ways of coping with grief and what special arrangements should be expected. Also discussed are examples of famous premature babies that thrived. The appendices include conversion charts, growth charts, a schedule for multiples, cardiopulmonary resuscitation - birth to one year, and resources. A glossary and an index conclude the text.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-671-03491-X.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant death, Infant development, Infant health, Low birthweight, Neonatal intensive care units, Neonatal screening, Parent education, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Premature infant diseases, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth

National Business Group on Health. 2010. Preterm birth and elective inductions prior to 37 weeks. [Washington, DC]: National Business Group on Health, 3 pp. (Health tips)

Annotation: This paper summarizes research findings on preterm births and early elective inductions in the United States, providing statistics on changes in the rate of preterm births and the health of babies born prior to 37 weeks. The paper also discusses the higher medical costs associated with late preterm births and offers guidelines to help employers reduce preterm births and the associated costs. Included are recommendations on elective deliveries provided by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), along with additional resources for both employers and employees. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational materials, Employer initiatives, Guidelines, Health care costs, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Statistics

Milwaukee Health Department. 2010. Infant mortality. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department,

Annotation: This website provides information about infant mortality in Milwaukee. It includes an overview of infant mortality and discusses leading causes, other factors affecting the infant mortality rate, and Fetal Infant Mortality Review. Links to additional infant mortality resources are provided.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Infant mortality, Premature infants, Racial factors, Risk factors, SIDS, State surveys, Wisconsin

MedImmune Advocacy. 2010. Voices for the voiceless: A premature infant advocacy training guide. [Gaithersburg, MD]: MedImmune, 59 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information, guidance, and resources for those who want to begin advocating for premature infants. The toolkit serves as an advocacy training guide and is designed to be a resource for people at all stages of advocacy involvement – from those with a specific area of interest who have lots of time to research the issues and take part in activities to those who can only spare an hour or two every few months. It provides an overview of the prevalence, severity, and issues surrounding prematurity, as well as tools to get users started in their advocacy efforts. Individual sections cover topics such as access to care, working with health insurance, media relations, talking points on prematurity, and public policy.

Contact: PreemieVoices.com, MedImmune Advocacy, 101 Orchard Ridge Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, Telephone: (301) 398-0000 Web Site: http://preemievoices.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Premature infants, Public policy, Training materials

Milwaukee Health Department. [2009]. Prematurity: The leading cause of infant death. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department,

Annotation: This website, which is geared toward consumers, provides information about prematurity. It explains what prematurity is and discusses what contributes to it, risk factors, and steps that can be taken to prevent it before and during pregnancy. Resources for more information are also listed.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Pregnancy, Premature infants, Prenatal care, Prevention, Resource materials, Risk factors

March of Dimes Foundation. 2009. Thinking about pregnancy after a premature birth. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes Foundation,

Annotation: This fact sheet is written for women who have had a premature infant and are concerned about having another. It provides information about what women and their health professionals can do to help ensure that women remain pregnant for a full 9 months.

Contact: March of Dimes Foundation, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (888) MODIMES Secondary Telephone: (914) 997-4488 E-mail: http://www.marchofdimes.com/contactus/contactus.html Web Site: http://www.modimes.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, High risk pregnancy, Pregnant women, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prevention, Risk factors, Treatment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.