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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (117 total).

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Perez-Patron MJ, Page RL, Olowolaju S, Taylor BD. 2021. Trends in singleton preterm birth by rural states in the U.S., 2012-2018. College Station, TX: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief examines the rates of singleton preterm births by rurality and census region across the United States for the years 2012-2018. It also presents variations by maternal characteristics, including race and ethnicity, payment method, and participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) during pregnancy among women who live in counties with different levels of rurality. The study findings indicate that the preterm birth rate for singleton pregnancies in the United States from 2012-2018 was 7.9% and had increased every year since 2014 in both rural and urban areas. The singleton preterm birth rate was higher for women residing in rural areas compared to women residing in urban areas. The report presents implications for these findings.

Contact: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Department of Health Policy and Management, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1266, Telephone: (979) 862-4238 Fax: (979) 458-0656 Web Site: http://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/index.html

Keywords: Pregnancy outcomes, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Rural heatlh, Rural populations

O'Neil S, Platt I, Vohra D, Pendl-Robinson E, Dehus E, Zephyrin L, Zivin K. 2021. High costs of maternal morbidity show why we need greater investment in maternal health. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 1 item

Annotation: This issue brief identifies nine maternal morbidity conditions, such as hypertensive disorders, and 24 maternal and child outcomes, such as cesarean section delivery and preterm birth, and uses an economic model to calculate the financial costs of maternal morbidity in the United States. The authors advocate for affordable, continuous health insurance coverage, including extending postpartum Medicaid coverage to ensure that key physical and mental health needs following birth are identified and met.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org

Keywords: Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcomes, Pregnant women

Casamassimo P, Holt K, eds. 2016. Bright Futures: Oral health—Pocket guide (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 90 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers health professionals an overview of preventive oral health supervision during five developmental periods: prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. It is designed to help health professionals implement specific oral health guidelines during these periods. For each period, information about family preparation, risk assessment, interview questions, screening, examination, preventive procedures, anticipatory guidance, measurable outcomes, and referrals is discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Bright Futures, Children, Dental care, Disease prevention, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Injury prevention, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Referrals, Resources for professionals, Screening

Connecticut Voices for Children. 2016. Independent performance monitoring in the HUSKY Program: Ensuring accountability for scarce state dollars. New Haven, CT: Connecticut Voices for Children, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on aspects of Connecticut’s publicly funded HUSKY Program performance and quality based on findings from independent performance monitoring. Topics include continuity of health insurance coverage and enrollment changes, maternal health and birth outcomes for new families, enrollment and preventive health services use in early childhood, trends in health services access and use, the impact of a federally funded project on maternal and infant oral health services, and data-quality improvement.

Contact: Connecticut Voices for Children, 33 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06510, Telephone: (203) 498-4240 Fax: (203) 498-4242 E-mail: voices@ctvoices.org Web Site: http://www.ctvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Connecticut, Early childhood, Enrollment, Evaluation, Financing, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Medicaid, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Pregnancy, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State MCH programs, Trends

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. The Healthy Babies Initiative resources and case studies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources describe state initiatives focused on improving birth outcomes. Contents include fact sheets, issue briefs, and case studies of prevention initiatives and programs that have had a positive economic impact. Topics include smoking cessation for women, maternal and infant disparities, infant mortality, prematurity and low birth weight, early elective deliveries, preconception and interconception care, nutrition and gestational diabetes, training, home visiting, newborn screening, medical home, family planning, breastfeeding, safe sleep, and life course.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Economic factors, Infants, MCH programs, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, State initiatives

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. ASTHO Healthy Babies Initiative. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials,

Annotation: This resource provides information to help state and territorial health agencies address the goal of decreasing prematurity in the United States. The resources are categorized in two ways: by life stage, including Preconception, Prenatal, Birth to 28 Days, and First Year; and by scope of resources, including Policy Resources, Community Resources, Organizational Resources, Health IT Resources, Healthcare Provider Resources, and Self-Management Resources.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant care, MCH programs, Policy development, Preconception care, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, State initiatives

Ventura SJ, Hamilton BE, Mathews TJ. 2014. National and state patterns of teen births in the United States, 1940-2013. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 33 pp. (National vital statistics reports; v. 63, no. 4)

Annotation: This report presents trends from 1940 through 2013 in national birth rates for adolescents, with particular focus on births to adolescents ages 15-19 and for the period since 1991. The percent changes in rates for 1991-2012 and for 2007-2012 are presented for the United States and for states. Preliminary data for 2013 are shown where available. Contents include tabular and graphical descriptions of the trends in adolescent birth rates by age group, race, and Hispanic origin. Topics include first and repeat births, health outcomes, and comparisons of rates for the United States and other developed countries.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Birth rates, Comparative analysis, Ethnic groups, Pregnancy outcome, Statistical analysis, Trends

Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board and National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 2013. Guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 20 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines on weight gain for women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant are based on the recommendations published in 2009 by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. They explain the importance of beginning pregnancy at a healthy weight; gaining the right amount of weight during pregnancy; and returning to a healthy weight after your baby is born. Included is a list of things women can do to ensure healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-27234-6.

Keywords: Body weight, Consumer education materials, Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Infant health, Maternal health, Obesity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Weight gain, Weight management

Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board and National Research Council. 2013. Implementing guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 20 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for health professionals highlights key points from the new guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy published in 2009 by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. Based on evidence that a woman's health and weight before pregnancy and after delivery are just as important as her health and weight during pregnancy, the booklet explains that beginning pregnancy at a healthy weight is key; that some weight gain during pregnancy (but not too much) is important; and that returning to a healthy weight after pregnancy will help set the stage for a healthy future pregnancy. A list of things that health professionals can do to help their patients achieve a healthy pregnancy is included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-27239-1.

Keywords: Body weight, Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Infant health, Maternal health, Obesity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Weight gain, Weight management

Declercq ER, Sakala C, Corry MP, Applebaum S, Herrlich A. 2013. Listening to Mothers III: Pregnancy and Birth–Report of the Third National U.S. Survey of Women's Childbearing Experiences. New York, NY: Childbirth Connection, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. women ages 18-45 who gave birth to single infants in a hospital from July 2011 through June 2012. It compares actual experiences of childbearing women, newborns, and families with mothers' values and preferences, as well as with evidence-based care, optimal outcomes, and protections granted by law. Topics include planning for pregnancy and the pregnancy experience; women's experiences giving birth; coming home with a new baby; choice, control, knowledge, and decision making; variations in experience; and trends.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Consumer surveys, Decision making, Outcome and process assessment, Pregnancy outcome, Trends

National Child and Maternal Health Education Program. 2013. Initiative to Reduce Elective Deliveries Before 39 weeks of Pregnancy: Is it worth it?. [Rockville, MD]: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1 video (4 min., 10 sec.).

Annotation: This video for consumers explains why it's important to mother and baby's health to wait at least 39 weeks of pregnancy to deliver if the mother or child's health is not in danger. The video is available in a full-length version (4 min.,10 seconds), as well as 60-and 30-second versions. The initiative web page provides additional information for moms to be and for health professionals, including tools to help spread the word such as an infographic, ecards, and badges to put on a personal web site, blog, or organizational web site.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Gestational age, Induced labor, National initiatives, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Risk factors

Mocan N, Raschke C, Unel B. 2013. The impact of mothers' earnings on health inputs and infant health. National Bureau of Economic Research, 54 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19434)

Annotation: This paper investigates the impact of mothers’ earnings on birth weight and gestational age of infants. It also analyzes the impact of earnings on mothers’ consumption of prenatal medical care, and their propensity to smoke and drink during pregnancy. Study methodology and findings are described.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking during pregnancy, Socioeconomic factors, Working mothers

Salinsky E. 2013. Improving birth outcomes in Medicaid. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, 8 pp. (NGA paper)

Annotation: This paper explores the role that states play in advancing a life-course approach to improving birth outcomes and the importance of state Medicaid policy that supports women's health throughout the life span. The paper lists and describes seven multi-state initiatives that have been launched at the national and regional levels to facilitate state efforts to improve birth outcomes. An appendix indicates which of these initiatives are available in each of the 50 states.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Infant health, Life course, Medicaid, Models, Policy development, Pregnancy outcome, Program improvement, State initiatives, Women's health

National Black Child Development Institute. 2013. Being black is not a risk factor: A strengths-based look at the state of the black child. Washington, DC: National Black Child Development Institute, 64 pp.

Annotation: This book comprises essays that focus on using children's, families' and communities' strengths to improve outcomes for children. Contents include examples from organizations and data points that indicate how children and families are doing across a range of measures. Topics include improving birth outcomes and promoting family support and engagement.

Contact: National Black Child Development Institute, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 110, Washington, DC 20005-4110, Telephone: (202) 833-2220 Secondary Telephone: (800) 556-2234 E-mail: moreinfo@nbcdi.org Web Site: http://www.nbcdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Children, Community participation, Families, Family support, Pregnancy outcomes, Program improvement

Hawkins J, Bonzon E, Rough A. 2012. The built environment. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Omaha, NE: CityMaTCH, 4 pp. (Women's health prevention brief; issue 3)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the importance of addressing the built environment to improve maternal health and birth outcomes. Contents include an overview of the built environment and research on the connections between the built environment and health, the biological and social impacts of an unsupportive built environment on maternal health and birth outcomes, and promising programs at the state and local levels.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental health, Health care systems, Maternal health, Model programs, Pregnancy outcome, Preventive health services, State MCH programs, Urban MCH programs

Ventura SJ, Curtin SC, Abma JC, Henshaw SK. 2012. Estimated pregnancy rates and rates of pregnancy outcomes for the United States, 1990-2008. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 21 pp. (National vital statistics reports; v. 60, no. 7)

Annotation: This report looks at trends in pregnancy rates and rates of pregnancy outcomes during the years 1990-2008. It describes patterns according to age, race, Hispanic origin, and marital status and discusses various factors underlying the trends in pregnancy rates and outcomes. Tables compare total pregnancy rates and outcomes (numbers of live births, induced abortions, and fetal losses) from 1976 through 2008, with more recent data (from 1990-2008) highlighting differences according to age, race, and Hispanic origin. Also included are estimated rates of pregnancy, total fertility, and total induced abortion rates by race and Hispanic origin for the years 1990, 1996, 2000, and 2005-2008. Detailed technical notes describe the sources for the data.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Adolescent pregnancy, Age factors, Birth rates, Data, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcomes, Racial factors, Statistical data, Statistics, Trends

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Forging a comprehensive initiative to improve birth outcomes and reduce infant mortality: Policy and program options for state planning. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 92 pp.

Annotation: This compendium is a collection of recommendations for states to address infant mortality, supplemented by action steps, examples, and case studies. Topics include implementing health-promotion efforts; improving access to health care for women before, during, and after pregnancy; and ensuring health care quality for all women and infants. The compendium also discusses implementing maternal-risk screening for all women of reproductive age, enhancing service integration for all women and infants, developing data systems to understand and inform efforts, and promoting social equity.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Perinatal health, Policy, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Statewide planning, Women

Johnson K. 2012. Addressing women's health needs and improving birth outcomes: Results from a peer-to-peer state Medicaid learning project. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 19 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This report identifies programs and policies to help states use the expansion of the Medicaid program to improve women's health and reduce adverse birth outcomes. Developed by seven state Medicaid agencies (Florida, Texas, Illinois, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and California) working as part of a peer-to-peer learning project, these programs are aimed at reducing high rates of maternal mortality, infant mortality, preterm births, and disparities in pregnancy outcomes. The report also includes public health strategies; quality improvement objectives; health system resources; and a policy checklist to help leaders in other states identify improvement opportunities that fit within their programs' eligibility requirements.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care reform, Medicaid, Policy development, Pregnancy outcome, Program improvement, State programs, Women's health

Bloom JK. 2012. Prenatal interventions that improve Native American pregnancy outcomes and reduce infant mortality: An integrative review. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University, 115 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study to identify interventions and perspectives that positively affect pregnancy outcomes and reduce infant mortality in indigenous (Native American) communities. It examines factors at the individual, interpersonal, community and public policy levels. The report describes the literature review used to identify documents and presents findings. Appendices include a research appraisal checklist, summaries of the literature reviewed, and a socioecological framework for pregnancy outcomes in native women.

Keywords: American Indians, Infant mortality, Literature reviews, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.