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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Eisenherg A, Murkoff HE. 2016. What to expect when you're expecting (5th ed.). New York, NY: Workman Publishing, 640 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a monthly overview of the pregnancy period from the first signs of pregnancy to postpartum care. Part one describes general principles about pregnancy and nutrition during pregnancy. Part two provides a detailed description of the pregnancy processes month by month. Part three discusses special cases and complications, such as gestational diabetes and hypertension, that may occur during pregnancy. Part four covers postpartum care, first weeks at home, lactation, and infant health. Spanish version also available.

Contact: Workman Publishing, 225 Varick Street, New York, NY 10014, Telephone: (212) 254-5900 Fax: (212) 254-8098 E-mail: info@workman.com Web Site: http://www.workman.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Childbirth, Infant health, Lactation, Nutrition, Postnatal care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Spanish language materials

National Child and Maternal Health Education Program. 2013. Initiative to Reduce Elective Deliveries Before 39 weeks of Pregnancy: Is it worth it?. [Rockville, MD]: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1 video (4 min., 10 sec.).

Annotation: This video for consumers explains why it's important to mother and baby's health to wait at least 39 weeks of pregnancy to deliver if the mother or child's health is not in danger. The video is available in a full-length version (4 min.,10 seconds), as well as 60-and 30-second versions. The initiative web page provides additional information for moms to be and for health professionals, including tools to help spread the word such as an infographic, ecards, and badges to put on a personal web site, blog, or organizational web site.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Gestational age, Induced labor, National initiatives, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Risk factors

Reid D. 2013. Using the Affordable Care Act and other opportunities to address maternal mortality. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence that women of color disproportionately experience pregnancy or childbirth-related complications that ultimately end in their death, in particular African American women (regardless of their income level). Topics also include documenting maternal mortality to determine maternity performance measures and best practices and how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care and other health care financing opportunities can assist in improving maternal health,

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Childbirth, Health care financing, Maternal mortality, Medicaid, Minority health, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Pregnancy complications, Pregnant women, Women's health

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. NPHIC webinar: Oklahoma Infant Alliance's later preterm infant toolkit. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mother, Healthy Babies Coalition, 1 podcast (49 min., 50 sec.). (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 15)

Annotation: This webinar discusses the Oklahoma Infant Alliance Late Preterm Infant Toolkit and its role in addressing the high rate of preterm deliveries in the state. The toolkit is meant for hospitals and agencies who work with the late preterm infant and discusses the development of a clinical practice guideline based on current evidence-based resources and research in reducing morbidities associated with late preterm birth.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Guidelines, Infant health, Oklahoma, Pregnancy complications, Prematurity, Preterm birth, State initiatives

Elixhauser A, Wier LM. 2011. Complicating conditions of pregnancy and childbirth, 2008. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 12 pp. (HCUP statistical brief; no. 13)

Annotation: This brief presents data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample on pregnancy and childbirth hospitalizations with complicating conditions in 2008. The brief provides information on hospital and client characteristics for the following types of hospital stays: complicated pregnancy during which no delivery occurred, delivery with complicated pregnancy or delivery, and delivery without any mention of complicated pregnancy or delivery. In addition, the report provides information on specific types of complicating conditions of pregnancy and delivery.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Hospitalization, Pregnancy complications, Statistical data, Women's health

Linden DW, Paroli ET, Doron MW. 2010. Preemies: The essential guide for parents of premature babies. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Pocket Books, 633 pp.

Annotation: This book is written for expecting or new parents of premature babies. It is divided into the following sections: before birth, in the hospital, a life together, and other considerations. Before birth outlines some known causes of premature labor and birth and how to prevent them. Topics discussed in the second part include the premature delivery, the neonatal intensive care unit at the hospital, testing and possible complications that occur in the first week, settling down in the hospital, and if baby needs surgery. Part three covers decisions and preparations for taking baby home, what to expect and watch for during early development and possible consequences of prematurity. Part four talks about losing a premature baby and ways of coping with grief and what special arrangements should be expected. Also discussed are examples of famous premature babies that thrived. The appendices include conversion charts, growth charts, a schedule for multiples, cardiopulmonary resuscitation - birth to one year, and resources. A glossary and an index conclude the text.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-671-03491-X.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant death, Infant development, Infant health, Low birthweight, Neonatal intensive care units, Neonatal screening, Parent education, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Premature infant diseases, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010. Diabetes and pregnancy: Gestational diabetes. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 pp.

Annotation: This booklet was developed for women who have been diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy and want to learn how to take care of themselves during and after pregnancy. Topics include what gestational diabetes is, how it can affect the health of mom and baby, and how it can be controlled. A log for monitoring blood sugar and diet is included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Gestational diabetes, Low literacy materials, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Self care, Women's health promotion

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010. Got diabetes? Thinking about having a baby?. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 pp.

Annotation: This booklet was developed for women who have diabetes and are thinking about getting pregnant. Topics include potential health complications in and self-care during and after pregnancy. A log for monitoring blood sugar and diet is included. A Spanish-language booklet is also available.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available at no charge (limit 500); also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Diabetes, Low literacy materials, Preconception, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Self care, Spanish language materials, Women, Women's health promotion

Center for HIV Law and Policy. 2009. HIV and pregnancy: Medical and legal considerations for women and their advocates. New York, NY: Center for HIV Law and Policy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This guide outlines the legal, ethical, and medical issues surrounding HIV and pregnancy in the United States. It addresses considerations for women and their advocates before, during, and after pregnancy, including HIV testing, treatment options for HIV-positive patients, and the legal rights of the expectant mother. It also discusses child birthing options and infant care practices that may help to reduce the risk of transmission from mother to child. The guide also underscores the public health advantage of treating women as active partners in their own and their newborn's treatment, and recognizing their right to appropriate counseling and medical care that accommodates their reproductive options. The guide includes an appendix of Web-based resources.

Contact: Center for HIV Law and Policy, 65 Broadway, Suite 832, New York, NY 10006, Telephone: (212) 430-6733 Fax: (212) 430-6734 E-mail: info@hivlawandpolicy.org Web Site: http://www.hivlawandpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: HIV, Health care delivery, Legal issues, Medical ethics, Newborn infants, Pregnancy complications, Pregnant women, Reproductive rights

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2008. Miscarriage. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, (Quick reference and fact sheets)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a description of miscarriage, outlines what is known about why it occurs, symptoms, treatment, tests, causes of repeat miscarriage, recovery times, and how long a woman should wait before attempting another pregnancy. References are provided.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com .

Keywords: Fetal death, Fetal mortality, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy loss, Spontaneous abortion

Behrman RE, Butler AS, eds; Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Understanding Premature Birth and Assuring Healthy Outcomes. 2007. Preterm birth: Causes, consequences, and prevention. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 772 pp.

Annotation: This books assesses the problem of preterm birth in the United States with respect to both its causes and outcomes. It addresses the need for research involving clinical, basic, behavioral, and social science disciplines. It is organized into sections including a summary of preterm birth in America, measurement of fetal and infant maturity, causes of preterm birth, diagnosis and treatment of preterm labor, consequences of preterm birth, and research and policy. Each section contains recommendations. References are provided and appendices include data sources and methods, several essays on prematurity and geographic variation, ethical issues, costs associated with preterm birth, and slected programs funding research. Biographies for the authoring committee and staff are provided along with an index.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-10159-X; ISBN 13: 978-0-309-10159-2.

Keywords: Infant health, MCH research, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Premature infants, Premature labor, Prematurity, Prenatal diagnosis, Prenatal health, Preterm birth

Pollit, K, Kopfman M, Salgancoff A. 2007. Maternity care and consumer-driven health plans. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report compares out-of-pocket maternity care costs under 12 consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) from the group and individual markets to the costs under a traditional health insurance plan. The report discusses the costs of maternity care, the features of private health insurance affecting maternity coverage, and the issues raised by the development of CDHPs. The report, which includes an executive summary, contains the following sections: (1) how does health insurance cover pregnancy?, (2) what are CDHPs?, (3) what does a typical pregnancy cost?, (4) how does maternity coverage under CDHPs compare to traditional insurance?, and (5) CDHP information resources to support consumer decision-making. A conclusion and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report as well as in several appendix tables.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Costs, Health insurance, Labor complications, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Vaginal birth

American Institute for Preventive Medicine. 2006. Healthy life: Prenatal self-care guide. (5th ed.). Farmington Hills, MI: American Institute for Preventive Medicine, 96 pp.

Annotation: This self-care guide has two parts: one providing information about pregnancy, labor, and delivery and the other about health problems and common complaints during pregnancy. The sections present the problem or complaint, list the causes, list the treatments, present a list of questions to ask when visiting a health care provider, list symptoms when a health care provider should be called, and list self care tips. The guide ends with a glossary of necessary terms. It is illustrated with drawings.

Contact: American Institute for Preventive Medicine, 30445 Northwestern Highway, Suite 350, Farmington Hills, MI 48334-3102 , Telephone: (800) 345-2476 Secondary Telephone: (810) 539-1800 Fax: (810) 539-1808 E-mail: aipm@healthylife.com Web Site: http://www.healthylife.com/ $5.95, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Childbirth, Exercise, Labor, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal care, Prenatal development, Prenatal education, Therapeutics

Edelstein BL, VanLandeghem K. 2006. Public and private-sector efforts to improve the oral health of pregnant women: Policies, programs, and practices (Final draft). No place: No publisher, 28 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a sampling of policies, programs, and practices in the public and private sectors that typify how some agencies have built upon the putative relationship between periodontal disease during pregnancy and unfavorable birth outcomes. This review provides information on how academics, insurers, state governments, policy organizations, professional societies, practitioners, and others have featured this oral-systemic connection in their efforts to address the oral health of pregnant women. This paper was commissioned for the "Research to Policy and Practice: Periodontal Health and Birth Outcomes" forum held on December 11-12, 2006, in Washington, DC.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: MCH research, Oral health, Periodontal diseases, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women

Savitz DA, Singer PC, Hartmann KE, Herring AJ, Weinberg HS. 2005. Drinking water disinfection by-products and pregnancy outcome. Denver, CO: Awwa Research Foundation, 212 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study to address the question of whether exposure to elevated levels of drinking water disinfection by-products is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome such as pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and reduced fetal growth. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) background to study, (2) study methodology, (3) methods for assignment of exposure, (4) pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes assessment, (5) statistical methods, (6) results, (7) interpretation, (8) analyses of live birth outcomes, and (9) blood biomarker study. An appendix, references, and a list of abbreviations are included.

Contact: Awwa Research Foundation, 6666 West Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO 80235-3098, Telephone: (303) 347-6100 Fax: (303) 730-0851 E-mail: info@awwarf.org Web Site: http://www.awwarf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disinfection, Environmental influences, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy loss, Pregnancy outcome, Teratology, Water pollution

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2005. Caffeine in pregnancy. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, (Quick reference and fact sheets)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the possible effects of caffeine consumption during pregnancy and on birth outcomes. It describes what food and beverages contain caffeine and in what amounts, medication that can contain caffeine, how caffeine affects the body, how caffeine may affect fertility and miscarriage, how caffeine may affect newborns and whether it enters breastmilk. References are provided.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Caffeine, Consumer education materials, Maternal fetal exchange, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome

CityMatCH. 2005. Preventing perinatal transmission of HIV AIDS. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This webcast on the prevention of the perinatal transition of HIV AIDS was held on February 17, 2005. The webcast featured three presenters: (1) Margaret Lampe, from the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention-Epidemiology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who discussed Rapid HIV-1 testing for women in labor with unknown HIV status; (2) Ana Rua-Dobles, from the HUG-Me Program in Orlando, FL, who presented on the perinatal nurse's role in the prevention of HIV vertical transmission; and (3) Jackie Nash, Regional HIV/AIDS Prevention Coordinator, Duval County Health Dept. in Jacksonville, FL, who talked about Florida's Targeted Outreach for Pregnant Women Act Program (TOPWA). The complete audio recording, along with all three powerpoint presentations, are available online. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, AIDS, Disease prevention, Disease transmission, Florida, HIV, HIV screening, Infant health, Maternal health, Perinatal influences, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal care, State programs

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2004. Managing gestational diabetes: A patient's guide to a healthy pregnancy. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 45 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides general guidelines for pregnant women with gestational diabetes for keeping healthy during pregnancy and for promoting the best outcome for the baby. It describes gestational diabetes, its causes and its features, includes a general treatment plan to help control the condition in making informed decisions about care with their health care providers, dietitians, and family members. Appendices provide information on high-fiber foods, a sample menu, and sample record sheets for monitoring glucose, food, and physical activity.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 04-2788.

Keywords: Blood glucose self monitoring, Gestational diabetes, Nutrition, Patient education materials, Physical activity, Pregnancy complications, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Altshuler K, Berg M, Frazier LM, Laurenson J, Longstreth J, Mendez W, Molgaard CA. 2003. Critical periods of development. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, 48 pp. (Paper series on children's health and the environment, paper 2003-2)

Annotation: This paper reviews crucial stages in human development from conception through adolescence and the implications of environmental insults or exposures at those different stages. Topics include the identification of critical periods of development and why they are critical, adverse effects of parental exposures before or around the time of conception, adverse effects of environmental exposures during pregnancy and childhood, and a review of adverse effects of early exposures that may be delayed until adulthood. A discussion of adverse effects include gene expression, early fetal death, congenital malformation, growth deficits, pregnancy complications, neonatal mortality, functional deficits, effects on puberty and sexual maturation, and cancer in childhood and later in life. The report concludes with a summary and a list of references.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, Room 2512 Ariel Rios North, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 1107-T, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 564-2188 Fax: (202) 564-2733 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children

Keywords: Adolescent development, Cancer, Child development, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental stages, Environmental exposure, Fetal development, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal influences

National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit. 2002. Action plan. Chapel Hill, NC: National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit, 34 pp.

Annotation: This action plan is developed by a coalition of 40 health, business, and government organizations committed to drastically reduce the number of women who smoke during pregnancy. The plan outlines a clinical and community-based intervention program for every pregnant smoker that involves health care providers, worksites, communities, state and federal government agencies, and the research community. The contents include an introduction and overview of the plan; consequences, challenges, and opportunities of preventing maternal smoking; aims and strategies of the action plan involving the health care system, using the media effectively; harnessing resources in communities and worksites; capitalizing on state and federal funding and policies; and promoting research, evaluation, and surveillance. The publication concludes with acknowledgments, references, and resources.

Contact: National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit, 725 Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7590, Telephone: (919) 843-7663 Fax: (919) 966-5764 E-mail: feedback@helppregnantsmokersquit.org Web Site: http://www.helppregnantsmokersquit.org/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Pregnancy complications, Prenatal education, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.