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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (71 total).

National Birth Defects Prevention Network. 2017. National birth defects prevention month. Houston, TX: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials and resources are designed to assist state program staff and others interested in promoting birth defects prevention during "January is Birth Defects Prevention Month." Contents include fact sheets, pamphlets, and posters about birth defects, preconception health, infections and immunizations, and healthy lifestyle. Topics include what you should know about birth defects, including congenital heart defects; folic acid and fetal alcohol syndrome; toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, and tips on preventing infections during pregnancy; and diabetes, smoking, and domestic violence. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 1321 Upland Drive, Suite 1561, Houston, TX 77043, E-mail: nbdpn@nbdpn.org Web Site: https://www.nbdpn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Gestational diabetes, Preconception care, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials

Chen A, Wilson D. 2017. How Medicaid expansion benefits maternal and child health. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 5 pp.

Annotation: This brief explains how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), through Medicaid expansion and expanded Medicaid coverage criteria for children, has improved maternal and child health (MCH). Topics include the impact of expanded coverage for women of reproductive age, particularly for preconception and interconception health care, and eligibility criteria for children ages 6 to 19 on MCH.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Maternal health, Maternal health services, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

Geisinger ML. 2016. Healthy mouth, healthy mom, healthy baby: Optimal oral health care before, during and after pregnancy. Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing education course reviews the scientific evidence on oral health and pregnancy and describes best practices for oral health care of women before, during, and after pregnancy. Topics include epidemiology and etiology of gingivitis and periodontitis in pregnant women, epidemiology and etiology of preterm birth and low birthweight infants, risk factors for preterm birth, potential mechanisms for interaction between oral inflammation and preterm birth, and standards of perinatal oral health care. Additional resources for health professionals, including fact sheets for prenatal health professionals and oral health professionals, are available.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Resources for professionals, Assessment, Consumer education materials, Continuing education, Dental care, Dentistry, Intervention, Oral health, Perinatal health, Postpartum care, Preconception care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Preventive health services, Safety, Standards

Mathematica Policy Research and Public Health Institute. 2015. Promoting maternal and child health through health text messaging: An evaluation of the Text4baby program—Final report. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 73 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an evaluation to assess the implementation and effectiveness of Text4baby, a free text messaging program for pregnant women and new mothers with an infant up to age one. The program is designed to improve maternal and child health among underserved populations in the United States. Topics include awareness, participation, health information knowledge, and behavior among women receiving prenatal care from four community health centers. The evaluation also addressed the role of the public-private partnership and lessons learned about the use of text messaging to provide health information during pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health centers, Health behavior, Health promotion, Infant health, Knowledge level, Maternal health, Mobile applications, Outreach, Participation, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2015. Opportunities and strategies for improving preconception health through health reform: Advancing collective impact for improved health outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 8 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores how states can capitalize on the opportunities presented by health reform to improve birth outcomes, particularly through preconception health. It highlights state Title V maternal and child health programs, particularly programs in three states (Michigan, Oklahoma, and Oregon) that participated in an action learning collaborative and are working to strengthen partnerships to implement preconception health activities, enhance preventive care for women, explore financing options for preconception care services, and use data to inform policy and program development. Delaware and Colorado also are featured as states that are working toward improved access to preconception care.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Collaboration, Colorado, Data, Delaware, Financing, Health care reform, Learning, Michigan, Oklahoma, Oregon, Policy development, Preconception care, Preventive health services, Program development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Women's health

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Preconception and pregnancy: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find preconception and prenatal care and websites about preconception and pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Consumer education materials, Electronic publications, Families, Family support services, Preconception care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. ASTHO Healthy Babies Initiative. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials,

Annotation: This resource provides information to help state and territorial health agencies address the goal of decreasing prematurity in the United States. The resources are categorized in two ways: by life stage, including Preconception, Prenatal, Birth to 28 Days, and First Year; and by scope of resources, including Policy Resources, Community Resources, Organizational Resources, Health IT Resources, Healthcare Provider Resources, and Self-Management Resources.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant care, MCH programs, Policy development, Preconception care, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, State initiatives

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. What home visitors can do to help their clients achieve adequate birth spacing and avoid unplanned pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Briefly)

Annotation: This brief for home visitors and for sites implementing home visiting programs provides information on why pregnancy planning and, in particular, adequate birth spacing matters for the health of both women and infants as well as their families. It also offers simple guidance for home visitors on how to discuss pregnancy planning and spacing as part of home visits. Descriptions of relevant resources are also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Family health, Family planning, Home visiting, Infant health, Preconception care, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Preconception Health+Health Care Initiative. 2014. National preconception / interconception care clinical toolkit. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help primary care health professionals individualize their care to best meet their client's overall and reproductive health needs. The toolkit builds on a triaging approach whereby care is based on the likelihood of conception before the next routine primary care visit. Contents include a reproductive life plan assessment and specific clinical recommendations for ten components of routine primary care including family planning guidance, nutrition, infectious diseases and immunizations, chronic disease, medication use, substance use, previous pregnancy outcomes, genetic history, mental health, intimate and partner violence. Each of the ten components provides background information, clinical guidance and tools, client resources, and references. Additional clinician resources include continuing medical education, articles, and news relevant to preconception health care.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Continuing education, Family planning, Health care delivery, Preconception care, Primary care, Reproductive health, Resources for professionals, Women, Women's health

Lee V. 2014. Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) To Reduce Infant Mortality: Update on regions IV, V and VI. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 16 pp.

Annotation: This set of slides describes the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality, including its aims, strategies, and measures, including reducing early elective delivery and smoking rates among pregnant women, increasing safe sleep practices and mothers delivering infants at the appropriate level of care, and changing Medicaid policies to increase the number of women who receive interconception care. It provides data showing trends from 2011 to 2013 and other accomplishments and the secrets of its success. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/mchbadvisory/InfantMortality/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Infant mortality, Perinatal care, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Regional programs, Smoking, Women's health

Robbins CL, Zapata LB, Farr SL, Morrow B, Ahluwalia I, D'Angelo DV, Barradas D, Cox S, Goodman D, Grigorescu V, Barfield WD. 2014. Core state preconception health indicators: Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2009. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summaries 63(SS03):1-62,

U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center. (2013). Preconception peer educator. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center,

Annotation: This CD-ROM and the web site contain materials for use in training college students who serve as peer educators on college campuses and in the community to raise awareness about health disparities, specifically infant mortality rates among African American babies. Topics include health disparities and minority health; infant mortality; African American health status and its impact on infant mortality; what research says about preconception health, infant mortality and prematurity; preconception care; HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and preconception health; and what a man would do. At completion of training, the Office of Minority Health and partners will link students with Healthy Start Programs, state/city health departments, state offices of minority health, and community based organizations for placement in summer internships, volunteer, or paid work opportunities.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Health status disparities, Infant mortality, Minority health, Peer education, Preconception care, Sexually transmitted diseases, Training materials, Young women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013-. Show Your Love. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes a national campaign to increase the number of women who plan their pregnancies and engage in healthy behaviors before becoming pregnant. The website also provides resources for promoting preconception health to women in communities including buttons, checklists, press releases, talking points, e-cards, posters, videos, public service announcements, podcasts, and an image library.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Campaigns, Family planning, Health promotion, Life course, Multimedia, National initiatives, Preconception care, Public awareness materials, Reproductive health, Women's health

Georgia Department of Public Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health Section. 2013. Recommended guidelines for perinatal care in Georgia (rev.). Atlanta, GA: Georgia Department of Public Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health Section, 56 pp.

Annotation: This document provides standard-of-practice recommendations for perinatal health care professionals in Georgia. It is also intended to be a blueprint for the State Perinatal Health Care System, a system to improve the quality of reproductive health care for women and perinatal health care for pregnant women and infants. Topics include strategy for action, preconception and interconception health care, antepartum care, intrapartum care, postpartum care, and perinatal infection.

Contact: Georgia Department of Public Health, Two Peachtree Street, N.W., 15th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30303-3186, Telephone: (404) 657-2700 Web Site: http://dph.georgia.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consultation, Georgia, Guidelines, Health care systems, Hospitals, Infant health, Infection control, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Perinatal services, Postpartum care, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Women's health

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Preconception care fact sheet. Washington, DC: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2 pp.

Annotation: This preconception care fact sheet provides an explanation of what preconception care is and why it is necessary and gives examples of preconception interventions and opportunities for state health agencies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health education, Health promotion, Infant health, Intervention, Preconception care, Pregnancy, Reproductive health, Screening, State initatives, Women's health

National Initiative on Preconception Health and Health Care. 2013. Effective strategies for promoting preconception health: From research to practice. [Atlanta, GA]: American Journal of Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.).

Annotation: This webinar provides information about how to improve the health of women of childbearing age. Panelists include contributors to the January/February 2013 supplemental issue on preconception health of the American Journal of Health Promotion (volume 24, no. sp. e). Topics include an overview of the journal issue, consumers' perceptions of preconception health, couples and preconception health, implementing interconception care in community settings, and reaching women through health information technology.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Health care, Information dissemination, Multimedia, Outreach, Preconception health, Reproductive health, Women's health

Rodgers AB, Yaktine AL; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Implementation of the IOM Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging action to support dissemination of pregnancy weight gain guidelines: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 85 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a March 2013 workshop to discuss issues related to encouraging behavior change that would reflect updated guidelines on weight gain during pregnancy, such as charting weight gain during pregnancy, improving choices concerning nutrition and physical activity, and receiving adequate pre- or post-conception advice about weight and pregnancy weight gain. Contents include communicating the pregnancy weight gain guidelines, discussing efforts to support behavior change, implementing the guidelines, reviewing the First Thousand Days Program, and collaborating for action, as well as final thoughts. Appendices include the workshop agenda, list of participants, speaker biographies, and the workshop statement of task.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-28966-5.

Keywords: Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight management, Postnatal care, Preconception care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Resources for professionals

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. Pre-existing diabetes and pregnancy: Potential effects of uncontrolled diabetes. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This chart is intended for women who have diabetes and want to get pregnant. It provides information on the potential effects of uncontrolled diabetes before and during pregnancy. Tips on controlling blood sugar to help prevent problems and links to additional resources on diabetes and pregnancy are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Congenital abnormalities, Infants, Preconception, Pregnancy in diabetics, Self care, Women

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.