Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (63 total).

Postpartum Support International. n.d.. Supporting postpartum families. Portland, OR: Postpartum Support International, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure, which is geared toward mothers experiencing pregnancy or postpartum mood or anxiety disorders, provides questions for mothers and families to determine whether a mother needs help. Information about Postpartum Support International and the services it offers is provided, and a membership and donor form is included. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Postpartum Support, International, 6706 SW 54th Avenue , Portland, OR 97219, Telephone: (503) 894-9453 Secondary Telephone: (800) 944-4773 Fax: (503) 894-9452 E-mail: support@postpartum.net Web Site: http://www.postpartum.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disorders, Family support, Parents, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Spanish language materials

Postpartum Progress. n.d.. Clinical tools for postpartum depression. [no place]: Postpartum Progress, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for clinicians involved in the care of pregnant and postpartum women include position papers, algorithms, toolkits, guidelines for treatment, screening tools, research on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, professional organizations, training and continuing education, books, and other resources. Information and peer support for pregnant and new moms with postpartum depression and other mental illnesses related to pregnancy and childbirth are also available from the website.

Contact: Postpartum Progress, E-mail: postpartumprogress@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.postpartumprogress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Mental disorders, Mental health, Perinatal bereavement, Perinatal health, Perinatal influences, Postpartum care, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Puerperal disorders, Resources for professionals, Women's health

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Depression during and after pregnancy: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for families on finding help and learning more about depression during and after pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Depression, Electronic publications, Families, Maternal mental health, Postpartum depression, Pregnancy, Pregnant women

Frazier TL. 2015. Maternal depression: Implications for parents and children and opportunities for policy change. Boston, MA: Community Catalyst, 10 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the effects of maternal depression on maternal health, parenting, and child development as well as the policy options that could reduce the burden of disease for affected families and system-level health care costs. Topics include the scope of maternal depression, the prevalence of depression among mothers with infants by socioeconomic status and severity, consequences of untreated depression, the need for a two-generation approach, and the importance of health coverage.

Contact: Community Catalyst, 30 Winter Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 338-6035 Fax: (617) 451-5838 E-mail: restuccia@communitycatalyst.org Web Site: http://www.communitycatalyst.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Costs, Depression, Health care systems, Health insurance, Infant health, Intervention, Maternal health, Mothers, Parenting, Policy development, Postpartum depression

Every Child Succeeds. 2014. Moving beyond depression: Greater success for new mothers in home visiting. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a comprehensive, focused, and integrated approach to identifying and treating depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs. The program involves three phases instituted over two years: (1) on-site training of home visitors in identification of maternal depression and role in the program, (2) training of therapists in Cincinnati in in-home cognitive behavioral therapy, and (3) ongoing training and support of therapists. Information about maternal depression, the program's research base, a training calendar, and additional resources about postpartum depression and postpartum support are included.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Depression, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Therapeutic programs, Training

Johnson K, Ammerman RT, Van Ginkel JB. 2014. Moving beyond depression: An effective program to treat maternal depression in home visiting–Opportunities for states. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a program that uses in-home cognitive behavioral therapy to treat maternal depression as an added component for home visiting programs. Topics include the impact of maternal depression on women, children, and families; the program's research and results, return on investment, design, and implementation; and opportunities and potential roles for states and home visiting programs.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Depression, Financing, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, State programs, Therapeutic programs, Training

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Depression in mothers: More than the blues–A toolkit for family service providers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information and strategies for family health providers to use in working with mothers who may be depressed. It includes facts about depression; screening tools for more serious depression; and referrals, resources, and handouts for mothers who are depressed.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Depression, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Screening

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. A comprehensive approach for community-based programs to address intimate partner violence and perinatal depression. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 143 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit highlights strategies and provides resources to help organizations address intimate partner violence and perinatal depression within their own communities. Topics include making the case, building and sustaining partnerships, raising awareness, developing cultural and linguistic competency, addressing policy, and implementing standards of care guidelines. Pre- and post-program assessment tools and links to national resources are included.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Depression, Domestic violence, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Perinatal health, Postpartum depression, Program evaluation

McDaniel M, Lowenstein C. 2013. Depression in low-income mothers of young children: Are they getting the treatment they need?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides a national look at rates of major depression and treatment in low-income mothers of young children. It discusses how depression is more prevalent and severe among low-income mothers and the effects on development in infants and young children, how low-income mothers are less likely to receive treatment, and how different types of treatment are offered and mother-reported effectiveness.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Depression, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Young children

Howell E, Golden O, Beardslee W. 2013. Emerging opportunities for addressing maternal depression under Medicaid. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the problem of maternal depression and its impact not only on the low-income mother but on her children. Topics include effective screening and treatment, Medicaid's potential role, issues outlined in the Affordable Care Act, challenges to providing services to mothers with depression enrolled in Medicaid, and emerging opportunities to address the challenges. A summary, recommendations, and references are also included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Maternal mental health, Medicaid, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Screening

Duke Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Efficacy and safety of screening for postpartum depression. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 215 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 106)

Annotation: This report describes the results of a 2004-2012 literature search that evaluated the performance of screening instruments for postpartum depression, potential benefits and harms of screening, and impact on appropriate postscreening actions. Report contents include an introduction to postpartum depression and its adverse outcomes, screening, clinical and socioeconomic factors affecting risk; chapters on the study methods and results; a discussion of the findings; and conclusions and references. Appendices provide further detail into how the study was performed.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 13-EHC064-EF.

Keywords: Literature reviews, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Research methodology, Screening

Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Sontag-Padilla LM, Lovejoy SL, Firth R, Pincus HA. 2013. Transforming systems for parental depression and early childhood developmental delays: Findings and lessons learned from the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative. [Santa Monica, CA]: Rand Corporation, 166 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an evaluation of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative of the Allegheny County Medical and Child Health Care Collaborative, an initiative to implement improvements to the local system of maternal and child health care. Report contents include an introduction to the initiative and its focus on maternal depression in low-income populations, system challenges, and a review of the need for a cross-system response in Allegheny County. Additional chapters discuss the methods for studying the initiative's framework, implementation, strategies, and evaluation; results and assessments on services, systems, and individuals; a discussion of lessons learned and limitations; as well as conclusions, recommendations, and next steps. Appendices include assessments, tools, outcome measure linkages, and reference studies.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-7857-5.

Keywords: Case studies, Families, Family child relations, Health services delivery, Maternal mental health, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression, Program evaluation, Screening

Sontag-Padilla L, Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Lovejoy SL, Firth R. 2013. Maternal depression: Implications for systems serving mother and child. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights evidence on the impact of maternal depression on the mother and child as it relates to the public-sector systems that serve them and discusses potential short- and long-term cost implications. This brief describes a supplemental component of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children initiative implemented in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which successfully implements depression screening in early intervention, develops cross-system referral processes, engages caregivers in services, and increases local capacity for providing relationship-based services by addressing many of the barriers identified in earlier stages of the collaborative’s work.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early interventions services, Local initiatives, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression

Washington State Department of Early Learning. 2012. Speak up when you're down: Postpartum depression. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Early Learning, 5 items.

Annotation: This set of materials is from the Washington State Postpartum Depression Awareness Campaign called Speak Up When You're Down, which is designed to help women and their families about the signs, symptoms, and treatment of postpartum depression. It includes answers to common questions, suggested books and online resources, a brochure in English and Spanish, and a poster.

Contact: Washington State Department of Early Learning, Olympia, WA Telephone: (866) 482-4325 E-mail: communications@del.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.del.wa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Consumer education materials, Families, High risk groups, Mental health, Postpartum depression, Public awareness campaigns, Spanish language materials, Treatment, Women's health

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Paying attention to mental health: Before, during and after pregnancy. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 11)

Annotation: This webinar offers an overview of mental health before, during, and after pregnancy and highlights the importance of prevention and awareness for both parents and professionals. The webinar examines the factors that contribute to perinatal mental health, discusses recent advances in maternal and child health, and describes the ways in which perinatal depression can be reduced or eliminated. Hosted by the Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, with maternal mental health expert Susan Dowd Stone, the webinar took place on May 16th, 2012, in celebration of National Women's Health Week.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Depression, Mental health, Postpartum depression, Pregnancy, Prevention, Treatment, Women's health

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and postpartum depression in parents of NICU babies. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 10)

Annotation: This webinar, hosted by the National Premature Infant Health Coalition in May 2012, presents the symptoms of acute stress disorders (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and postpartum depression (PPD) and examines research on the potentially dangerous relationship between high levels of emotional distress in new parents and impaired infant development. The webinar's featured speaker, Dr. Michael Hynan, also discusses model programs in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and potential interventions that include screening mothers and fathers for emotional distress; offering psychosocial programs in the NICU; teaching developmental care and parenting competencies; and facilitating parent support groups led by veteran NICU parents and psychologists.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Infant development, Intervention, Mental health, Neonatal intensive care units, Postpartum depression, Posttraumatic stress disorder

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Infant Health Program. 2012. Maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a printout of presentation slides that provide information about maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. The presentation discusses opportunities for preventing premature birth. obesity, and maternal depression in the context of home visiting, Best practices for safe sleep, infant illness care, and infant feeding problems are also discussed.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Feeding disorders, Health care, Home visiting, Infant feeding, Infant health, Mental health, Obesity, Postpartum depression, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Women's health

Children's Defense Fund-Minnesota. 2011. Zero to Three Research to Policy Project: Maternal depression and early childhood. [St. Paul, MN]: Children's Defense Fund-Minnesota, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the impact of maternal depression on very young children in Minnesota. The report discusses research findings on maternal depression and early childhood, implications of this research for Minnesota, and Minnesota's current system and options for decreasing the prevalence and impact of maternal depression in the state.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, Minnesota, 550 Park Street, Saint Paul, MN 55103, Telephone: (651) 227-6121 Fax: 651-227-2553 E-mail: cdf-mn@cdf-mn.org Web Site: http://www.cdf-mn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Depression, Health care systems, High risk groups, Mental health, Minnesota, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Prevention, Research, Risk factors, State surveys, Young children

Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies. 2011. Reducing effects of postpartum depression: Provider education and maternal empowerment. [Alexandria, VA]: Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies, 1 video (ca. 50 min.).

Annotation: This archived webinar, broadcast July 13, 2011, discusses issues surrounding postpartum and perinatal depression (PPD) and the impact on the health and well-being of mothers and their infant's neurobiological development. Topics include how underreported or underdiagnosed PPD is; varying levels of severity including healthy rebound, "baby blues", diagnosed perinatal depression, postpartum bi-polar disorder, and the rare postpartum psychosis. Topics also include maternal stresses due to lacks of sleep/exhaustion, depression stigma, previous psychological or medical histories, post-traumatic stress from unexpected C-section or adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, partner or violence abuse, and financial stresses. Social risk factors for depression such as multiple births or feeling of isolation are also discussed. Resources are discussed including model state programs, online resources, proposed legislation, and the importance of establishing local postpartum depression networks and support services.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Early childhood development, Hotlines, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent support services, Parenting, Perinatal care, Postnatal care, Postpartum depression, Resources for professionals

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.