Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Wheeler S. 1990 (ca.). Central Alabama System of Perinatal Care [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to establish an organized system of perinatal care which would improve the present unfavorable maternal and child health indices in the project area. Registered nurses, certified nurse-midwives, and obstetrical gynecologists were involved. The project focused on outreach, risk-based prenatal care and planned delivery, case management, postdelivery home visits, and sick-child care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-225136.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Fragmentation of Services, Indigent Patients, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Barnes-Boyd C. 1989 (ca.). Resources, Education and Care in the Home (Project REACH) [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago in collaboration with the Chicago Department of Health and the Visiting Nurses Association, 53 pp.

Annotation: This project was aimed at reducing Chicago's infant mortality rate, which is twice that of the national rate. Cause-specific postneonatal mortality rates for selected communities were taken from state records, and an interagency health systems model was established to make efficient use of resources and expertise. Intervention included prenatal education and parenting skills enhancement. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103233.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Health Education, Hispanics, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Infections, Injuries, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Adolescents

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.