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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Harper K; Ne'eman A. 2018. A state multi-sector framework for supporting children and youth with special health care needs. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 24 pp.

Annotation: This framework describes desired systems performance outcomes for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in the domains of health services; family support and social services; education and employment services; and law enforcement and juvenile justice contact. The document provides a table listing services used by CYSHCN and their families by domain; a description of how the literature was reviewed; a list of statutes, policies and existing documents relating to the outcomes; a list of state, federal and other actors who support CYSHCN and their families; and available datasets and state policy compendia. The audience for the framework is parents, state lawmakers, and other stakeholders.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Families, Health care systems, Policies, Service delivery systems, State programs, Youth with special health care needs

Johnson-Staub C. 2014. First steps for early success: State strategies to support develpmental screening in early childhood settings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses current trends to access to developmental screening, private and federal efforts to increase access (including Head Start, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Parts B and C, Medicaid and Title V of the Maternal and Child Health Block Grants), and challenges in expanding access. It then discusses state policies supporting developmental screening in child care and early education (including licensing, subsidies, pre-kindergarten, quality initiatives and service coordination) and state policy recommendations.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Developmental screening, Public policies, State programs, Young children

Joint Commission. 2011. Advancing effective communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community: A field guide. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Joint Commission, 92 pp.

Annotation: This field guide is intended to help hospitals and health care organizations improve quality of care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients and their families by enhancing efforts to provide care that is more welcoming, safe, and inclusive. The guide presents strategies for creating processes, policies, and programs that are sensitive to and inclusive of LGBT individuals and their families. Topics include leadership; provision of care, treatment, and services; work force; data collection and use; and patient, family, and community engagement. Each chapter contains recommended issues to address and practice examples.

Contact: Joint Commission, One Renaissance Boulevard, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181, Telephone: (630) 792-5800 Fax: (630) 792-5005 Web Site: http://www.jointcommission.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Families, Health care delivery, Homosexuality, Hospitals, Inclusion, Leadership, Policies, Programs, Sexual identity, Statistical data, Treatment

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2006, 2000, 1994. School health policies and programs study: Questionnaires. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health,

Annotation: These questionnaires are designed to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. Components include health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services and foods and beverages available at school, healthy and safe school environment, physical school environments, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement in schools.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Food service, Health education, Health policy, Health services, Local government, Physical education, Policies, Programs, Questionnaires, Schools, State government, Survey tools, Teachers

Kimminau KS, Huang C, McGlasson D, Kim J. [2005]. Smiles across Kansas: 2004—The oral health of Kansas children. [Topeka, KS]: Kansas Department of Health and the Environment, Division of Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Smiles Across Kansas project, the purpose of which was to complete a comprehensive oral health survey of students in third grade in Kansas. The report discusses (1) key findings in the following areas: tooth decay, untreated tooth decay, dental sealants, dental insurance, time and reason for last dental visit, and urban and rural income disparities and (2) strategies, policies, and promising practices in other states. A discussion, implications, recommendations, and methods and research design are also included. The report includes four appendices that contain consent, screening, and screening results forms and information about population density peer groups and regional groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Oral Health, Curtis State Office Building, 1000 S.W. Jackson Street, Suite 200, Topeka, KS 66612-1274, Telephone: (785) 296-5116 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/ohi Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Economic factors, Families, Health insurance, Kansas, Oral health, Parents, Public policies, Rural health, Rural population, School age children, Screening, State programs, Surveys, Urban health, Urban population

National League of Cities, Council on Youth, Education, and Families. [2005]. A city platform for strengthening families and improving outcomes for children and youth. Washington, DC: Council on Youth, Education, and Families, National League of Cities, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for mayors and city councilmembers provides an agenda for municipal action and leadership on behalf of children, youth, and their families. The document discusses the costs of inaction, four essential tasks for sustained progress, and key action steps to consider. Topics for action steps include early childhood development, youth development, education and afterschool, health and safety, youth in transition, family economic success, and neighborhoods and the community.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Aftercare, Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Local programs, Public policies, Safety, Youth in transition programs

Rodriguez MA, Kane M, Alonzo-Diaz L, Flores GR. 2005. One out of three Latino adolescents overweight or at risk. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; Sacramento, CA: Latino Coalition for a Healthy California, 2 pp. (Health policy fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the prevalence of overweight among Hispanic adolescents in California. The fact sheet offers statistics showing that Hispanic adolescents have a higher rate of overweight than adolescents in some other ethnic groups in the state. Risk factors for overweight are presented, and a discussion of the overall problem, including recommendations for policymakers, is included. Statistical information is presented in figures in the fact sheet.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, California, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Public policies, Racial factors

Goldrick L. 2005. Youth suicide prevention: Strengthening state policies and school-based strategies. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 12 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on state policies and school-based strategies for preventing suicide among adolescents. The brief provides an overview of the problem; provides background; and discusses the role of school in suicide prevention, state support for suicide prevention programs, and state suicide-prevention initiatives. A conclusion and selected sources for further information are included. The brief also includes endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Initiatives, Public policies, School health programs, State programs, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Brown ER, Lavarreda SA, Rice T, Kincheloe JR, Gatchell MS. 2005. The state of health insurance in California: Findings from the 2003 Califoria Health Interview Survey. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 74 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on data from the 2003 and 2001 California Health Interview Surveys, examines health insurance coverage and the sources and consequences of periods of uninsurance for the nonelderly population in California. The report (1) paints an overall picture of health insurance and uninsurance in California and the changes experienced between 2001 and 2003, (2) examines changes in employer-based insurance, (3) profiles Medi-Cal and Healthy Families enrollees and their families, as well as children who are uninsured but eligible for coverage in these program, (4) examines the consequences of being uninsured vs. having coverage as it relates to access to care and getting necessary care, and (5) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of key public policy options to extend coverage to California's 6.6 million uninsured residents. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. An executive summary and a conclusion are included. The report includes one appendix: estimating uninsurance using population-based survey data.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Families, Health insurance, Low income groups, Public policies, State health insurance programs, Uninsured persons

Ross DC, Cox L. 2005. In a time of growing need: State choices influence health coverage access for children and families. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 80 pp., exec. summ. (2 pp.).

Annotation: This report on an annual 50-state survey of enrollment and eligibility policies in Medicaid and the Sate Children's Health Insurance Program presents survey findings and decisions made by policymakers regarding strategies to make programs available, affordable, and easy to obtain. The report also discusses where states stand on eligibility, enrollment, and renewal procedures and cost-sharing rules and practices. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report includes an executive summary and the survey methodology.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost sharing, Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Public policies, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State programs, Surveys, Uninsured persons

Marin PS, Brown BV. 2005. Are teens driving safer?. Washington, DC: Child Trends Databank, 10 pp. (CrossCurrents, issue 4)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of data relevant to adolescent driving behavior, including adolescent crash rates and trends, licensure rates, seatbelt use, and other risk factors associated with fatal crashes among adolescents. The brief also discusses the possible causes of the high rates of adolescents in fatal crashes, strategies states have taken to make adolescents safer, and some implications for policy and future research. Statistical information is provided in figures and tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Public policies, State programs

Dorn S. 2004. Towards incremental progress: Key facts about groups of uninsured. Washington, DC: Economic and Social Research Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This series of fact sheets discusses various classifications of uninsured Americans who could become the focus of incremental expansions, setting out key facts and basic policy design questions for each group. The following potential coverage clusters are discussed: (1) employees of small business, (2) workers who lose their jobs, (3) workers who decline employee coverage, (4) low-income parents, (5) low-income childless families, (6) the near-elderly, (7) young adults, (8) children, and (9) immigrants. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheets.

Contact: Economic and Social Research Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-8877 Fax: (202) 833-8932 E-mail: announcements@esresearch.org Web Site: http://www.esresearch.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Immigrants, Low income groups, Older adults, Parents, Public policies, Small businesses, Uninsured persons, Young adults

Vlassoff M, Singh S, Darroch JE, Carbone E, Bernstein S. 2004. Assessing costs and benefits of sexual and reproductive health interventions. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 115 pp. (Occasional report; no. 11)

Annotation: This report aims to inform decision-makers about the key findings of existing studies about the costs and benefits of investments in sexual and reproductive health, to identify what factors the studies encompass and what they leave out, and to provide a complete picture of what the costs and benefits would look like, including benefits that are hard to measure. The report is divided into three parts. Part 1 is a review and synthesis of what is known about the costs and benefits of investments in sexual and reproductive health, part 2 is a comprehensive outline that can be used by researchers and policymakers to view the gamut of costs and benefits, and part 3 provides a partial application of the framework in the reproductive and maternal health field, namely, in the area of contraceptive services and supplies. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report, as well as in appendix tables. The report includes one appendix: definitions, methodology, and data sources.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Costs, Decision making, Literature reviews, Public policies, Reproductive health, Research, Sexual health, Women's health

Proscio T. 2004. Healthy housing, healthy families: Toward a national agenda for affordable healthy homes. Columbia, MD: Enterprise Foundation, National Center for Healthy Housing, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report examines emerging trends that point to progress in improving the health prospects of low-income families through practices and policies for providing a decent and affordable home. The report discusses the history of the connection between public health and affordable housing, the health risks associated with poor housing, lead exposure in the home, evidence and standards for healthy housing, harnessing market forces to improve housing conditions through Air Plus for cleaner indoor air, forming coalitions for voluntary change, and healthy housing at the grassroots. A conclusion and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500 , Columbia, MD 21044, Telephone: (410) 992-0712 Secondary Telephone: (877) 312-3046 Fax: (443) 539-4150 E-mail: info@nchh.org Web Site: http://www.nchh.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932699-16-3.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Coalitions, Community programs, Environmental health, Health, Housing, Housing programs, Lead poisoning, Low income groups, Public policies

National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices. 2002. Policy academy: Improving oral health care for children. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials provide information on a series of policy academies convened by the National Governors Association in 2000 and 2001 to enhance states' ability to meet the oral health needs of children from families with low incomes. The materials serve as a resource for states seeking to incorporate the lessons learned from the academies into their own action plans. The materials include a description of the policy academies, news releases, agendas for three of the academies, faculty and state attendee lists, a faculty guide, a planning guide, a homework assignment, talking points, and PowerPoint presentations. Topics include the development of an oral health action plan for children, states' visions of future issues and challenges, an assessment of the reality in the states, priorities and goals, strategies, and action steps.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Conferences, Low income groups, Model programs, Oral health, Policies, State programs, Strategic plans

Friedman JE, Magrab PR, McPherson MP. 1997. International perspectives: Building local systems of care for children with disabilities and their families. [Washington, DC]: Center for Child Health and Mental Health Policy, Georgetown University Child Development Center, 69 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on policies and practices relating to children with disabilities of countries attending the fourth international Congress on Serving Children with Disabilities in the Community held on May 30, May 31, and June 1, 1996, in Bethesda, Maryland. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) development of national profiles, (2) developing policies and programs at the national level, (3) legislation and policy, (4) parent-professional partnerships, (5) planning and developing community-based systems of service, (5) decentralizing services for children with disabilities, (6) funding, (7) voluntary and private sector partnerships, and (8) conclusions: action agenda. The report includes two appendices: (1) the congress agenda and (2) a national profiles response form.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Communities, Community based services, Education, Families, Financing, International health, Legislation, National programs, Parents, Public policies, Social services

University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health. 1995. Our families, our future: Strategic guidelines for maternal and child health in Pennsylvania. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Advisory Council, 33 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended for organizations and individuals throughout the state in setting priorities, developing policy, allocating resources, and implementing programs that affect the health of pregnant women, mothers, infants, children, and adolescents. Topics covered include system improvement; access to care; legislative and policy issues; funding; health promotion and education; evaluation, monitoring, and quality assurance; professional education and development; and cultural sensitivity and competence. Each topic area is briefly discussed, and specific objectives and strategies are listed.

Keywords: Child health, Guidelines, Maternal health, Pennsylvania, Policies

Lewis AC. 1995. Believing in ourselves: Progress and struggle in urban middle school reform, 1989-1995. New York, NY: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, 125 pp.

Annotation: This book analyzes the results of a project funded by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation to effect reform in urban middle schools, it is the third in a series of books about the five year project. The first two were called "Gaining Ground" and "Changing the Odds;" they reported on the conditions in the participating schools at the end of the second and fourth years. This book summarizes the project; it recounts efforts made to engage the affected parties: the teachers, professionals, principals, parents, and students. It also reviews the conditions affecting the reform process; it considers the interactions between various controlling forces affecting the process, assessment techniques, the unions, and the role of the school district administrators. A final section of the book considers future policy implications.

Contact: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, 415 Madison Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 551-9100 Contact Phone: (212) 551-9100 Fax: (212) 421-9325 E-mail: info@emcf.org Web Site: http://www.emcf.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Development, Educational change, Middle schools, Parent participation, Policies, Policy development, Principals, Professional personnel, Reform, Students, Teachers, Urban schools

Kagan SL, Weissbourd B, eds. 1994. Putting families first: America's family support movement and the challenge of change. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 514 pp. (Jossey-Bass social and behavioral science series; Jossey-Bass education series)

Annotation: This book contains twenty chapters by individual authors which focus on current trends in family support services and programs and which project future changes that could improve them. There are six sections which group the issues into these categories: family support in a changing context, institutional change, programmatic change, policy change, challenges for the family support movement, and a conclusion. The authors review current principles and practices and consider future issues related to the quality of services, training, and the evaluation of services. They also note the movement of family support services into mainstream institutions such as schools, churches, prisons, and the workplace and examine policy changes at the local and national levels.

Contact: Jossey-Bass Publishers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.JosseyBass.com $45.00. Document Number: ISBN 1-55542-667-0.

Keywords: Family support, Policies, Programs, Services

Zigler E, Styfco SJ, eds. 1993. Head Start and beyond: A national plan for extended childhood intervention. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 155 pp.

Annotation: This book evaluates three federal programs designed to help disadvantaged children succeed in school: Head Start, Follow Through, and Chapter 1, and discusses the newly created Head Start Transition Project. The authors propose ways to restructure these programs to better meet the needs of the children concerned.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child care, Early intervention, Education, Elementary schools, Federal programs, Head Start, Policies

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.