Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Brown M. n.d.. Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project: [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the project address the leading causes of childhood mortality in Oklahoma - motor vehicle crashes, submersions and burns. The overall methodology focused on utilization of intra- and interagency coalitions. Specific strategies included car seat loaners programs, drowning and burn prevention education activities, and smoke alarm programs. The project successfully carried out objectives related to prevention of motor vehicle injuries, drowning and burns. By empowering collaborating agencies and programs, the project has assured continuation of a focus on prevention of pediatric injuries in Oklahoma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161569.

Keywords: Burns, Car Seats, Child, Community-Based Education Programs, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Parents, Poisons, Safety

Buttrey J. n.d.. Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, 56 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to enhance existing capabilities in emergency medical services for children (EMSC) to reduce mortality and morbidity from injuries and critical illnesses among infants and children. This scope of the project was regional, in collaboration with Idaho, Oregon, and Washington EMSC projects. In addition, specific funding targeted project activities to enhance EMSC capabilities in Wyoming, Montana, and Utah. The four major goals of the Utah EMSC program were to: (1) Develop a comprehensive intermountain pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) data base; (2) reduce the morbidity and mortality of Native American children living in the region; (3) educate emergency care providers in the region about the capability, availability, and response times of existing intermountain regional air transport systems; and (4) establish consistent regional protocols and educational programs for EMS systems throughout the intermountain region. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121883.

Keywords: American Indians, Burns, Data Collection, Data bases, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Poisons, Rural Population

Legacy. 2014. Vaporized: E-cigarettes, advertising, and youth. Washington, DC: [American Legacy Foundation], 22 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents findings from two studies on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) advertising and its impact on youth. Contents include information about use and awareness among adolescents and young adults, and industry advertising. Topics include awareness of e-cigarette advertising, spending across channels and by brand, and advertising reach across TV and print among adolescents ages 12-17 and among young adults ages 18-24. The appendix contains information on the demographics of study participants and the e-cigarette brands included in the analysis.

Contact: Truth Initiative, 900 G Street, N.W., Fourth Floor, Washington, DC 20001, Web Site: http://truthinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Consumer protection, Mass media, Nicotine, Poisons, Research, Smoking, Statistical data, Young adults

Moore J. 1991 (ca.). South Carolina Childhood Injury Reduction Project = Project Care: Childhood Accident Reduction Effort [Final report]. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, 36 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Childhood Injury Reduction Project (CHIRP) was to assume leadership in the development of a system by which data concerning fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries would be compiled, analyzed, reported, and ultimately used in the development of prevention strategies. The overall goal was to have a system in place by which childhood injury data were reported to a central agency by September 1991. Toward this goal, two impact objectives were developed: (1) A statewide surveillance system was to be established by September 1991 to provide a data base on childhood injury; and (2) a coalition of agencies and associations with interest in childhood injury was to be formed by September 1990 to focus on the problem and provide input into the development of the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-145985.

Keywords: Accidents, Burns, Children, Data Collection, Information Systems, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Poisons, Safety, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Trauma Foundation. 1991. An advocate's guide to the cost of injury in the United States. San Francisco, CA: Trauma Foundation, 40 slides.

Annotation: This scripted presentation was adapted from a report entitled "Cost of Injury In the United States: A Report to Congress, 1989" which was prepared by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Johns Hopkins University at the request of Congress and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It provides some data on injury types and causes, with motor vehicles and firearms accounting for 50 percent. The information presented illustrates that beyond social and emotional costs, injuries have a devastating economic price. Six areas of injury are discussed: motor vehicles, firearms, falls, poisonings, drownings, and fire and burns. The guide presents information from this report in graphic form in order to provide useful tools to advocates who will explain the economic consequences of the problem of violence in the United States.

Contact: Trauma Foundation, San Francisco General Hospital, Building One, Room 300, San Francisco, CA 94110, Telephone: (415) 821-8209 Fax: (415) 821-8202 E-mail: tf@traumaaf.org Web Site: http://www.traumaf.org $95.00.

Keywords: Advocacy, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Burns, Costs, Drowning, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Injuries, Injuries--types, causes, agents, Injury prevention, Injury severity, Injury surveillance systems, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Poisons, Resources for professionals, Slides, Statistics, Tobacco, Training materials, Trauma care

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.