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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (101 total).

n.d.. Posters. No place: No publisher, 9 posters.

Annotation: Each poster in this collection was prepared by an insurance company or a state agency. They direct attention to various issues in child safety. A poster by American Re-Insurance Company shows a child with his head bandaged, and cites the statistic on injuries when bike helmets are not worn. A second poster by American Re-Insurance Company repeats the statistic, but illustrates it with an overturned bike. The New York State Health Department poster shows a cross section of a house in which a hazardous activity is pictured in each room. The viewer is told that these hazards number forty, and is asked to identify them. The reverse side of the poster shows the answers. The remaining posters are by Massachusetts health and safety agencies. One shows a baby in a car seat and points out safety features of the seat. Another shows two gallon jugs: one of milk and one of bleach. The viewer is made to realize that a two year old would not know the difference. Three posters reinforce the "buckle up" message, and there is one on playground safety. Both English and Spanish are used in the posters.

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246 Price unknown.

Keywords: Bicycles, Car seats, Helmets, Poisoning, Posters, Residential injuries, Seat belts, Spanish language materials

Davidson GB. n.d.. Toward the control of lead poisoning in children: A cost/benefit analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 46 pp. (Study series no.: 1-6 (9a))

Annotation: This paper evaluates the general worth of a specified lead poisoning control program confined to the Children and Youth Projects' child population only. The sensitivity of the cost/benefit model to the assumptions of the paper as well as to the input data considered is considered. The expected benefit of the proposed lead poisoning control program is compared to the expected cost. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Cost effectiveness, Federal MCH programs, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Title V programs

Rhyne J. n.d.. North Carolina Childhood Injury Prevention Project: [Final report]. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Human Resources , 49 pp.

Annotation: This project conducted activities on the state and county level, primarily addressing the risk for poisoning, burns, scalds, and motor vehicle injuries for children 4 years of age and younger. Project objectives were to: (1) Develop strategies to make passive injury prevention measures available and accessible, (2) develop incentives for the use of passive injury prevention measures, (3) provide the public with information so that informed decisions could be made to prevent childhood injury, and (4) develop a plan for injury surveillance. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198364.

Keywords: Burns, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Low income groups, Motor vehicle crashes, Poisoning, Safety

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. n.d.. A family guide—20 easy steps to personal environmental health now. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides simple steps that families can take to make their environment healthier. Topics include label reading, noise, carbon monoxide alarms, child safety, job hazards, allergies, water pollution, lead, radon, overheating, ozone, handwashing, healthy eating, tobacco products, and sun exposure.

Contact: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-16, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2233, Telephone: (919) 541-3345 Fax: (919) 541-4395 E-mail: webcenter@niehs Web Site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Families, Lead poisoning, Radon, Safety, Sun exposure, Water pollution

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2018. State health care delivery policies promoting lead screening and treatment for children and pregnant women. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 18 pp.

Annotation: This document provides the results of scan of health care policies in all 50 states plus Washington DC that promoted lead screening and treatment for children and pregnant women. This review includes metrics, incentives, provider guidelines, CHIP abatement coverage, and reporting requirements. The report was developed in partnership with the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) as part of the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Environmental Health (MCEH) Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health policy, Lead poisoning, State legislation, State surveys

Clevenger AA. 2017. Overdose poisoning deaths to children in Virginia, 2009-2013. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations from case reviews of overdose poison deaths among infants, children, and adolescents up to age 17 in Virginia for the five year period between 2009 and 2013. Topics include how overdose is impacting infants and children and their families in Virginia, which children are at risk, where are they at risk, how are they at risk, and what can be done to further promote health and safety in their lives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 400 East Jackson Street, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 786-3174 Fax: (804) 371-8595 E-mail: OCME_CENT@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/medical-examiner Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Child death review, Child safety, Children, Health promotion, High risk groups, Household safety, Infants, Injury prevention, Opiates, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Virginia

W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 2016. Managing lead in drinking water at schools and early childhood education facilities. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators and community leaders provides information about ways to limit children's exposure to lead in drinking water in schools and early childhood education facilities. Contents include information about the danger of lead in drinking water, how federal regulation has reduced exposure to lead in drinking water, deciding if a lead testing program is necessary, getting school buy-in for a program, involving external and community partners, preparing and taking lead samples, choosing remediation options, and communicating with the public. Recommendations are also included.

Contact: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, One Michigan Avenue, East, Battle Creek, MI 49017-4012, Telephone: (269) 968-1611 Fax: (269) 968-0413 Web Site: http://www.wkkf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Communication, Community action, Environmental exposure, Lead, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Lead poisoning screening, Regulations, School health programs, Schools, Testing, Water

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

Rau T, Reyes L, Urzua SS. 2013. The long-term effects of early lead exposure: Evidence from a case of environmental negligence. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 52 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18915)

Annotation: This paper estimates the effect of early lead exposure on academic achievement and adult earnings. It analyzes longitudinal information from individuals attending primary and secondary schools in the city of Arica (in northern Chile), which received exposure to toxic chemicals containing high concentrations of lead that put a large number of families at risk. Data include information on residential proximity to the polluted area, levels of lead exposure, comprehensive demographic information, nationally representative academic test scores and administrative data on adult earnings.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Chile, International health, Lead poisoning

Philadelphia Child Death Review Teams. 2013. Child death review report 2009-2010. [Philadelphia, PA]: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, Medical Examiner's Office, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report describes and discusses child deaths that occurred in Philadelphia in 2009 and 2010 and that were reviewed by the Philadelphia Child Death Review Team. The report provides background and an overview of child deaths reviewed during the period and discusses infant deaths, natural deaths, unintentional injury deaths, and intentional injury deaths.

Contact: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 1401 JFK Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Telephone: (215) 686-45200 Fax: (215) 686-5212 Web Site: http://www.phila.gov/health/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Cancer, Child abuse, Child death, Child death review, Cause of death, Child neglect, Drowning, Firearm injuries, Infant death, Intentional injuries, Poisoning, SIDS, Unintentional injuries

Child Trends Databank. 2013. Lead poisoning: Indicators on children and youth. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about children and adolescents with elevated blood lead levels. The repot discusses trends; the importance of blood lead levels; state, local, and international estimates; national goals; related indicators; and data sources. A definition of elevated blood lead levels is included. [Record in process]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Environmental exposure, Lead, Load poisoning, Research, Trends

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. 2012. Low level lead exposure harms children: A renewed call for primary prevention. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about new scientific knowledge, new technical developments, and their practical implications for childhood lead-poisoning-prevention efforts. The report consideres the usefulness of the "level of concern" as a result of accumulating scientific evidence of adverse effects of even low levels of lead exposure in children. In addition, the report considers laboratory capability for measuring blood lead levels in establishing new blood-lead-level guidance, provides advice on communicating to groups affected by policy changes, and makes recommendations for further research on lead-exposure-prevention and -intervention strategies.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communication, Intervention, Lead poisoning, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research

Levi J, Segal LM, Kohn D. 2012. The facts hurt: A state-by-state injury prevention policy report. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 75 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report provides information about state injury prevention policies and about recommendations for evidence-based strategies to reduce injuries in the United States. It focuses on a series of 10 injury-prevention indicators across each state that, collectively, offer an overview of areas of strength and weakness in the state's injury-prevention policies. Topics include vehicle injuries; violence-related injuries; falls; drowning; sports- and recreation-related injuries; injuries from poisoning; research tools for reducing injuries; and fire-related injuries.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Burns, Drowning, Falls, Injuries, Injury prevention, Poisoning, Recreational injuries, Research, Sports injuries, State initiatives, Transportation injuries, Violence

National Center for Environmental Health. 2012. Blood lead levels in children. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Environmental Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents introduces a new recommendation that the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control's definition of "blood lead level of concern" be changed from 10 micrograms per deciliter to 5 micrograms per deciliter, thus increasing the number of children who may be reported as having lead exposure and allowing parents, doctors, public health officials, and communities to take action earlier to reduce the child’s future exposure to lead. The fact sheet discusses actions parents can take to make their homes more lead-safe.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Lead poisoning, Prevention

Pickett OK. 2012. Lead poisoning prevention: Professional resource brief. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Osborn D, Hinkle L, Rosenthal J. 2011. Using geographic information to target health disparities: State experience. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes how two states analyzed race and ethnicity data and targeted interventions to specific geographic locations. Virginia coupled geographic information systems (GIS) mapping with multi-level spatial analysis to identify areas where infant mortality rates are the highest; the extent of racial and ethnic disparities in infant deaths; the underlying causes of those infant deaths; and how to best intervene. Rhode Island used GIS mapping in conjunction with Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to address health disparities related to tobacco-related diseases and lead poisoning. The technique helped the state locate communities where the most severe disparities exist; identify how multiple factors are causing the problem; and allocate resources for selected interventions.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Ethnic factors, Geographical factors, Health status disparities, Infant mortality, Lead poisoning, Needs assessment, Racial factors, Rhode Island, State programs, Tobacco use, Virginia

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2010. State injury indicators report. (5th ed.)—2006 data. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state-level statistical data on injury indicators and outcomes from 26 state health departments that voluntarily participated in this surveillance effort. Categories include indicators for: (1) all-injury violence (2) traumatic brain injury, (3) drowning, (4) fire-related, (5) motor vehicle, (6) poisoning, (7) firearm-related injuries (8) homicide, and (9) suicide. The indicators for each category are presented in tabular form, preceded by explanatory text. The appendix provides instructions for calculating national public health surveillance system indicators using 1999 data.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Drowning, Firearms, Homicide, Injury, Injury surveillance systems, Motor vehicle crashes, Outcome evaluation, Poisoning, Protective factors, Public health, Risk factors, State surveys, Statistics, Suicide, Violence

Jones L, Parker JD, Mendola P. 2010. Blood lead and mercury levels in pregnant women in the United States, 2003-2008. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 52)

Annotation: This report presents geometric mean lead and mercury blood levels of pregnant women in the United States. The report compares mercury and lead levels by pregnant vs. non-pregnant women, by women's ages, for pregnant women with no prior pregnancies vs. those with prior pregnancies, by education level, by race and ethnicity, and by Mexican-American women born in Mexico vs. those born in the United States.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Educational attainment, Environmental exposure, Ethnic factors, Immigrants, Lead poisoning, Mercury, Pregnant women, Racial factors, Statistical data

Children's Defense Fund Healthy Child Campaign. 2009. Disparities in children's health and health coverage. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses disparities in health and health insurance coverage for infants, children, and adolescents in minority groups compared with their counterparts. Information is presented in the following areas: prenatal care, low birthweight, and infant mortality; oral health; asthma; lead poisoning; and childhood obesity.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Asthma, Health insurance, Infant health, Child health, Infant mortality, Lead poisoning, Low birthweight, Minority groups, Obesity, Oral health, Prenatal care, Uninsured persons

Agarwal N, Banternghansa C, Bui L. 2009. Toxic exposure in America: Estimating fetal and infant health outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 56 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14977)

Annotation: The paper examines the effect of exposure to toxic releases on infant and fetal mortality rates in the United States between 1989 and 2002, and presents data, methodology, results, study diagnostics, and policy implications.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental factors, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Poisoning

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.