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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

Leavitt R. 2009. Cultural competence: A lifelong journey to cultural proficiency. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK, 264 pp.

Annotation: This book represents an effort to facilitate the development of cultural competence and cultural proficiency among physical therapists. The book covers theory, practice, and professional development areas of study that have frequently been omitted from the traditional curriculum for rehabilitation professional students or continuing education for the practitioner. Chapters 1,2, and 3 address the domains of culture and cultural competence from a broad perspective. Chapter 4 identifies special considerations that need to be addressed when doing an ethnography of a client. Chapter 5 is devoted to understanding disability. Chapter 6 focuses on present-day circumstances of disparities in health status, health care, and physical therapy. Chapters 7 and 8 are about poverty and racism. Chapter 9 is about communication. Chapter 10 introduces the concept of service learning and explores the relationship between service learning and cultural competence. Chapter 11 discusses the social construct of disability. Chapter 2 provides specific strategies to enable individual physical therapists and the profession of physical therapy to work toward increased cultural competence.

Contact: Slack, Incorporated, 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ 08086, Telephone: (856) 848-1000 Fax: (856) 853-5991 Web Site: http://www.slackbooks.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-55642-876-0.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communication, Cultural competence, Health, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Physical therapists, Physical therapy, Physical therapy education, Poverty, Racism, Rehabilitation

Chiarello LA. [2004]. Center for leadership in pediatric physical therapy [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences, Drexel University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to prepare leaders in the field to promote service, teaching, and research to improve the quality of life of children with disabilities and their families, to address the need for doctoral prepared pediatric physical therapists, and to increase the research on the effectiveness of interventions and service delivery for children with disabilities. Report contents include descriptions of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, and results and outcomes. Additional sections list publications and products, dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up, and type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Final reports, Health services delivery, Leadership training, MCH research, Pediatrics, Physical therapy, Professional education

Kartin D. 2003. Center for Leadership in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education: [Final report]. Seattle, WA: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 80 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes the Center for Leadership in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education program, based at the University of Washington School of Medicine, during the period July 1, 1997, to June 30, 2003. The project's goal was to provide leadership in pediatric physical therapy education to address the needs of populations of mothers and children, particularly those with special health care needs, through the support of post-professional graduate training; the development and dissemination of curriculum resources; and the provision of consultation, technical assistance, and continuing education. Report sections include (1) purpose of project and relationship to Social Security Act (SSA) Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) support and sources needed to replicate. The report includes 10 appendices, including an evaluation plan, summaries, presentations, descriptions of activiities, and more. An abstract is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Continuing education, Final reports, Health personnel, Children with special health care needs, Leadership training, Physical therapists, Physical therapy education, Professional training, Washington

Hankinson SE, Colditz GA, Manson JE, Speizer F, Manson JE, eds. 2001. Healthy women, healthy lives: A guide to preventing disease from the landmark Nurses' Health Study. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster, 546 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information from the Nurses' Health Study on a woman's probability of developing specific diseases and suggests how that probability may change with certain alterations in diet, weight control, physical activity, and other lifestyle changes. Part one discusses the Nurses' Health Study and what observations have been made by researchers and what they mean to the study of women's health issues. Part two provides information and suggestions on lowering the risk of diseases. Topics covered include coronary heart disease, different types of cancers, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, age-related eye disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The third part provides information on changing behaviors including physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and pain relievers. The appendices give information on types of epidemiological studies; being an informed consumer of health information; and a section on tables on weight and nutrition. The book concludes with a glossary, selected readings, and an index.

Contact: Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas , New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (212) 698-7000 Web Site: http://www.simonsays.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-684-85519-4.

Keywords: Alcohols, Alzheimers disease, Analgesic drugs, Antiinflammatory drugs, Arthritis, Asthma, Breast cancer, Cancer, Colon cancer, Coronary care, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Eye diseases, Family planning, Food, Hormone replacement therapy, Life cycle, Lung cancer, Menopause, Minerals, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Ovarian cancer, Physical activity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Reproductive health, Research programs, Skin cancers, Smoking, Strokes, Vitamins, Weight management, Women's health, Women's health promotion

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training and Education. 2000. Maternal and child health training program: [Fact sheets]. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training and Education, 15 pp.

Annotation: These fact sheets describe the fifteen leadership training programs in maternal and child health. The training programs are in the following areas: continuing education and development, social work, pediatric occupational therapy, pediatric physical therapy, graduate medical education in historically black colleges and universities, adolescent health, maternal and child health leadership education in neurodevelopmental and related disabilities, behavioral pediatrics, nursing, schools of public health, pediatric pulmonary centers, the maternal and child health training program, nutrition, communication disorders, and pediatric dentistry. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health, Behavioral sciences, Blacks, Communication disorders, Continuing education, Graduate education, Leadership training, Lung diseases, MCH training programs, Medical education, Neural development, Nursing, Nutrition, Pediatric dentistry, Pediatric occupational therapy, Physical therapy, Public health education, Social work

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 1998. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: The evidence report. [Rockville, MD]: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 228 pp.

Annotation: This report provides guidelines for health care professionals on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. The objectives of the report are to (1) identify, evaluate, and summarize published information about the assessment and treatment of overweight and obesity; (2) provide evidence-based guidelines for physicians, other health professionals, and health care organizations for the evaluation and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults; and (3) identify areas for future research. The report is divided into the following seven chapters: (1) introduction, (2) background on overweight and obesity, (3) examination of randomized controlled trial evidence, (4) treatment guidelines, (5) summary of recommendations, (6) future research, and (7) appendices. The appendices include guidelines development methodology; a literature review; a description of evidence; special populations; obesity and sleep apnea; a body mass index chart; practical dietary therapy information; a resource list; and a glossary of terms. Also provided are lists of abbreviations, references, and publications.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm $8.50; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH 98-4083.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Body composition, Body weight, Cardiovascular disease, Diabetes mellitus, Diet therapy, Guidelines, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Research, Risk factors, Weight management

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1997. Maternal and Child Health Leadership in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education: Application kit for CFDA 93.110TI—Application guidance, including form PHS-6025-1. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 25 pp.

Annotation: This document explains the Maternal and Child Health Center for Leadership in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education grant application process. It includes Bureau directives, lists specific requirements and program elements for MCH leadership in pediatric physical therapy education, and explains the application process. Appendices include additional instructions and guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Applications, Children with special health care needs, Federal grants, Infants with special health care needs, Leadership, MCH training programs, Manuals, Pediatrics, Physical therapy, SPRANS

Lewis M. 1995. Predicting Preschool Function from Contingency Intervention [Final report]. New Brunswick, NJ: University of Medicine and Dentistry-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 61 pp.

Annotation: This project determined whether experience with a special early intervention program, focusing on the process of learning itself, was predictive of the cognitive, communicative, and adaptive functioning and motivation of developmentally delayed preschoolers. A group of more than 100 developmentally delayed preschoolers who participated in a special supplemental 3-month contingency intervention program during their first year were seen at 4 years of age. The study provided evidence of the long-term impact of learning to control environment early in life on subsequent functioning. The results have implications for the effective cognitive and physical therapy of the very young disabled child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-177191.

Keywords: Delayed Development, Delayed Development, Early Intervention, Learning Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, MCH Research, Physical Therapy, Preschool Children, Preschool Children, Research

Davis S. 1991. Intravenous Antibiotic Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis: Home versus Hospital [Final report]. New Orleans, LA: Tulane University School of Medicine, 121 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to compare two treatment locations—hospital and hospital/home—for use of intravenous antibiotics on patients who have cystic fibrosis and who experience acute pulmonary exacerbations. The study compared the safety, efficacy, cost, and psychosocial effects of the two places of treatment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-136225.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Chronically Ill, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Inhalation Therapy, Intravenous Therapy, Nutritional Therapy, Physical Therapy, Psychological Testing

Affiliated Children's Arthritis Centers of New England. 1990. Physical therapy standards of care for children with chronic arthritis. Boston, MA: The Affiliated Children's Arthritis Center of New England, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document consists of the standards of care developed by the Affiliated Children's Arthritis Centers of New England (ACACNE) for physical therapy in treatment of children with arthritis. The standards are meant to serve as guidelines for each of the 13 tertiary pediatric institutions located in six New England states in the ACACNE program. Topics covered include the principles of exercise and activity, assessment, problem and goal identification, the treatment plan, child and family education, the physical therapist as a member of the health care team, and physical therapist qualifications. A 3-page bibliography is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Juvenile arthritis, Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Physical therapy, Standards

Wilhelm IJ, ed. 1988. Proceedings of the symposium on priorities for physical therapy in maternal and child health. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division of Physical Therapy, 76 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the presentations at a symposium at which leaders in pediatric physical therapy and representatives of the various communities of interest considered the major issues of current concern relative to the delivery of physical therapy services to children and their families. Topics included research, education, practice, and administration. High priority issues identified were manpower shortage, identification of the scientific basis of practice, translation of the scientific basis into practice, measurement, curriculum, spectrum of practice, and communication and coordination of services.

Contact: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division of Physical Therapy, Bondurant Hall, Suite 3000, 321 South Columbia Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: 919 966-4708 Fax: 919 966-3678 Web Site: http://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/physical/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Child health, Conference proceedings, Maternal health, Physical therapy

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Children with Handicaps. 1971. The pediatrician and the child with mental retardation. Evanston, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 180 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this book is to provide the pediatrician with up-to-date information and resources to assume a role in the treatment of children with mental retardation. The contents discuss mental retardation from the perspectives of diagnosis and evaluation, health services, genetic considerations, metabolic aspects, community services, residential care, legal considerations, psychological aspects, speech and language development, educational aspects, psychiatric considerations, nursing services, nutrition, physical therapy, and counseling.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Counseling, Diagnosis, Evaluation, Genetics, Health services, Language development, Legal issues, Mental retardation, Metabolic diseases, Nursing services, Nutrition, Pediatricians, Physical therapy, Psychological characteristics, Residential care, Speech development

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Division of Physical Therapy. 1970. The role of the physical therapist and the training needs of those working in pediatric programs. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Division of Physical Therapy, 54 pp.

Annotation: This is a report of special project no. 465, June, 1969 to July, 1970 supported by the Maternal and Child Health Service. The report begins with a historical review and then discusses program personnel, definition of need, objectives of the project, method, interpretation of the results of the questionnaire, present role of the physical therapist in pediatric programs, present needs of the physical therapist working in pediatric programs, and future roles and future needs of the physical therapist in pediatrics. Background readings are suggested. The appendices list the project consultants and participants and provide a copy of the questionnaire used. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Education, Federal MCH programs, Pediatrics, Physical therapy, Reports

Davison WC, Levinthal JD. 1969. The compleat pediatrician: Practical, diagnostic,therapeutic and preventive pediatrics for the use of general practitioners, pediatricians, interns, and medical students. (9th ed.). Durham, NC: Duke University Press, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a wide range of pediatric conditions and other issues related to pediatric care, including respiratory conditions, nutritional and abdominal conditions; skin, contagious, and exanthem conditions; circulatory, metabolic, and glandular conditions; urogenital conditions; bone, joint, and muscle conditions; laboratory tests, feeding, diets, nursing, and therapy; growth and development; history, and physical exam; and chemotherapy and drugs.

Keywords: Bone diseases, Breastfeeding, Cardiovascular diseases, Child development, Child health, Communicable disease, Diet, Drug therapy, Feeding, Growth monitoring, Joint diseases, Medicine, Metabolic diseases, Muscular diseases, Nutrition, Pediatric care, Pediatrics, Physical examination, Respiratory disorders, Skin diseases, Tests, Urogenital diseases

Dallas County Youth Study, Citizens Committee and Council of Social Agencies of Dallas. 1963. Report of Health Services Section Dallas County Youth Study = Report of health services for children and youth of Dallas County. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Youth Study, Citizens Committee and Council of Social Agencies of Dallas, 170 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a picture of what the members of the consultant team for the Health Services Section of the Dallas County Youth Study consider the important next steps that should be taken to extend and improve services for the mothers and children of Dallas. The report is intended to be a guide for program planning on a community basis. It provides a summarized review of existing resources and facilities; indicates the many interrelated components of a comprehensive community program necessary to meet the health needs of children and youth; and offers suggestions and recommendations. Three appendices include a description of nutrition services and physical therapy services, and four tables.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Communities, Guidelines, Health services, Maternal health, Nutrition, Physical therapy, Program planning, Texas

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.