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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (51 total).

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. n.d.. Mi futuro será brillante: Actividad física y alimentación saludable—para mujeres adultas. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to encourage Spanish-speaking adult women to increase current levels of physical activity, healthy eating, and to communicate with their health care providers to set goals for behavioral changes. It is a companion to the online guide, a set of 10 tip sheets which expand on the topics and provide practical information, ideas, and activities to help women adopt healthy behaviors to reach their goals.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Consumer education materials, Exercise, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Physical activity in kids and teens: Family resource brief (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This breif is designed to help families find websites and learn more about physical activity and kids and teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Recreation, Special health care needs

Special Olympics. 2014-. Project UNIFY toolkit. Washington, DC: Special Olympics,

Annotation: This toolkit provides resources to help schools implement Project UNIFY, an initiative that focuses on social inclusion that brings youth with and without intellectual disabilities together through sports and related activities. The resources describe Project UNIFY's vision, its major components, how to get started, implementation models, the connection to equal education and inclusion, evaluation reports, and the project's impact.

Contact: Special Olympics, 1133 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3604, Telephone: (202) 628-3630 Secondary Telephone: (800) 700-8585 Fax: (202) 824-0200 E-mail: info@specialolympics.org Web Site: http://www.specialolympics.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Physical fitness, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Inclusive schools, Information services, Mental retardation, School health programs, Sports

Borrud L, Chiappa MM, Burt VL, Gahche J, Zipf G, Dohrmann SM, Johnson CL. 2014. National health and nutrition examination survey: National youth fitness survey plan, operations, and analysis, 2012. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 16 pp. (Vital and health statistics; Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 163)

Annotation: The report provides information about the plan, operations, and analysis of the first national-level survey to estimate the physical activity and fitness levels of children and adolescents ages 3-15 in the United States. Contents include information on the planning and sample design; ethical, privacy, and confidentiality considerations; field operations; mobile examination center operations; a report of findings and remuneration; and data release and analytic guidelines.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. 2014–1363.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Confidentiality, Data analysis, Data collection, Evaluation methods, National surveys, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Research design

Washington Dental Service Foundation. 2013–. The Mighty Mouth. Seattle, WA: Washington Dental Service Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help people understand that oral disease can be prevented and that good oral health is essential to overall health. Contents include how-to tips on topics such as toothbrushing, flossing, getting oral health checkups, smart snacking, questions to ask the dentist and physician, and finding and paying for oral health care. Additional resources include infographics, posters, a website widget and social media posts, and videos.

Contact: Washington Dental Service Foundation, P.O. Box 75983, Seattle, WA 98175-0983, Telephone: (206) 528-2373 Fax: E-mail: foundation@deltadentalwa.com Web Site: http://www.kidsoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Health promotion, Life course, Media campaigns, Nutrition, Oral health, Physical fitness, Public awareness campaigns, Public service announcements

Holt K. 2013. One step at a time: Helping young children be physically active!—Bright Futures obesity prevention training for child care providers. Washington, DC: Bright Futures Georgetown University,

Annotation: This curriculum is a series of three modules designed to help child care providers working in local programs promote children’s physical activity. Topics include why it’s important for young children to be physically active, how much physical activity children need, how child care providers can promote physical activity in child care programs, adults’ roles in promoting physical activity, and provides ideas that child care providers can share with parents to help their child be physically active. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Bright Futures at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9772 E-mail: brightfutures@ncemch.org Web Site: http://www.brightfutures.org/georgetown.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Curricula, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2012. Healthy People 2010 grant program for chapters: Obesity/physical fitness program summaries–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 30 pp.

Annotation: This compendium on obesity and physical fitness programs summarizes the goals, outcomes, and future plans of the American Academy of Pediatric's (AAP's) Healthy People 2010 Grant Program for Chapters. Contents include information on the program's selection criteria, topical summaries by state, and related AAP initiatives and resources.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Grants, Healthy People 2010, Obesity, Pediatric care, Physical fitness, Prevention programs, Professional societies

Pate R, Oria N, Pillsbury L, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. 2012. Fitness measures and health outcomes in youth. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 259 pp.

Annotation: This report offers an evidence-based approach to selecting field-based fitness measures for children and adolescents in a national fitness survey. Recommendations for tests to be used in schools and other educational settings are also provided. Topics include (1) measuring fitness, (2) methodology for selecting and interpreting fitness measures, (3) fitness measures for body composition, (4) fitness measures for cardiorespiratory endurance, (5) fitness measures for musculoskeletal fitness, (6) fitness measures for flexibility, (7) fitness measures for a national survey, (8) fitness measures for schools and other educational settings, and (9) future needs.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website, after registration. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-26284-2.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Body composition, Child health, Measures, Physical fitness, Schools, Surveys

Center for Mississippi Health Policy. 2011. Year two report: Assessing the impact of the Mississippi Healthy Students Act. Jackson, MS: Center for Mississippi Health Policy, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of implementing regulations aimed at preventing childhood obesity in Mississippi by improving nutrition, physical activity, and health education in public schools. The report focuses on findings from research examining the relationship between students' fitness and academic performance, onsite reviews of the nutrition environment in schools, surveys of parents and school officials, and interviews with key legislators. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Mississippi Health Policy, Plaza Building , 120 North Congress Street, Suite 700, Jackson, MS 39201, Telephone: (601) 709-2133 Fax: (601) 709-2134 E-mail: info@mshealthpolicy.com Web Site: http://mshealthpolicy.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Mississippi, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Policy development, Prevention programs, School age children, School health education, School health programs, State regulations

Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport. 2007. Developing physically active girls: An evidence-based multidisciplinary approach. Minneapolis, MN: Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, 108 pp. (2007 Tucker Center research report)

Annotation: This report discusses the physiological, psychological, and sociological dimensions and impact of physical activity in the lives of young girls. It summarizes an original report addressing the same topic created 10 years prior to this, and provides an overview of the research and implications of this report's key findings. The report concludes with recommendations for best practices.

Contact: Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, University of Minnesota, 203 Cooke Hall, 1900 University Avenue, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, Telephone: (612) 625-7327 E-mail: info@tuckercenter.org Web Site: http://education.umn.edu/tuckercenter/default.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Female children, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Recreation

Brindis C, Valderrama LT, Park J, Hair E, Cleveland K, Cochran S. 2005. Towards meeting the needs of adolescents: An assessment of federally funded adolescent health programs and initiatives within the Department of Health and Human Services. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center; Washington, DC: Child Trends, ca. 175 pp.

Annotation: This report aims to provide a picture for program managers and policymakers and to help shape future efforts as they make the most effective use of resources in meeting the needs of adolescents, their families, and their communities. The report ascertains what progress has been made at the federal level to meet the needs of adolescents in the following content areas: health and well-being, fitness, family and peer relationships, school environment, smoking, alcohol use, and violence. The report answers four questions about federal efforts to improve adolescent health: (1) is there a national policy that addresses the promotion of adolescent health?, (2) is the Department of Health and Human Services making an effort to create healthier environments for adolescents through a multi-level approach?, (3) what is the status of evaluations of federally funded adolescent health programs?, and (4) what can we learn from existing evaluations of programs that seek to influence adolescent health outcomes? Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report and in an appendix. Five appendices include an expanded methodology, tables, program resources, a bibliography, and program references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau].

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol consumption behavior, Communities, Families, Family relations, Federal programs, Final reports, Physical fitness, Public policy, Relationships, Schools, Smoking, Violence

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2005. Overweight and physical activity among children: A portrait of states and the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 48 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook highlights major findings of the National Survey of Children's Health on overweight and physical activity among children ages 10-17 in the United States. It presents national- and state-level information based on parents' reporting of height, weight, and physical activity levels. Topics also include trends in participation in sports based on gender, age, socioeconomic status, perceptions of neighborhood safety, and parent participation. State-level data include comparisons to national averages and are provided by age level, family socioeconomic status, and gender. A technical appendix describes the survey, data collection, data analysis, accuracy of the results, and availability of the data. Endnotes conclude the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Children, National surveys, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Sports, State surveys, Statistical data

Schor EL, ed. 2004. Caring for your school-age child: Ages 5 to 12. New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1 v.

Annotation: This book provides information parents need to take care of children between the ages of 5 and 12. It designed to help the parents prepare their children for the world outside of the home. The book includes 60 chapters organized in these parts: promoting health and normal development, nutrition and physical fitness, personal and social development, behavior and discipline, emotional problems and behavior disorder, family matters, children in school, chronic health problems, and common medical problems. The book treats topics into two ways: it includes chapters which provide background information to help the parents develop a context for the problems their children face, and it contains chapters targeted to particular problems which provide specific suggestions for dealing with them. This book is the second of a three-volume series developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Feeling Fine Programs.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $29.95 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Behavior, Behavior disorders, Child development, Child health, Child nutrition, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental stages, Discipline, Emotional development, Family relations, First aid, Parenting, Parenting skills, Physical fitness, Psychosocial development, School adjustment, School age children

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2004. The role of media in childhood obesity. Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 12 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief explores the potential contribution of children's use of media such as TV, videos, cable TV, video games, and the Internet, to the rising rates of childhood obesity. The report presents research on the issue and outlines media-related policy options that have been proposed to help address childhood obesity. Topics include a discussion of reduced media time in weight loss interventions, media use and physical activity, effects of food advertising on children, and body type or body image portrayed in media. The brief concludes with endnotes.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC Office/Public Affairs Center, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.kff.org/about/bjcc/bjcc_floor.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Body weight, Child health, Children, Food habits, Internet, Mass media, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Research

Virginia Joint Committee of the Board of Education and Board of Health. 2004. Final report: Committee meeting September 7, 2004. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings and recommendations of a joint committee that studied the feasibility of developing and education curriculum for proper nutrition and exercise for students in grades K-12 and examined a series of broader issues pertaining to the nutrition and physical activity of K-12 students. Topics include a nutrition and physical education curriculum, establishment of state guidelines for development of nutrition and physical activity policies by local school divisions, establishment of a mechanism for state-level evaluations and technical assistance, and continuing collaboration between the Virginia Department of Health and the Department of Education on issues concerning the health of the school age population. The report includes a list of physical activity and nutrition initiatives in counties around the state.

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, P.O. Box 2448, Richmond, VA 23218, Telephone: (804) 864-7000 E-mail: questions@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Community programs, Curricula, Guidelines, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Public policy, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Students, Virginia

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 2002. Physical activity fundamental to preventing disease. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the need to encourage a more active lifestyle among Americans of all ages. Topics include the role of physical activity being fundamental in preventing disease; the economic consequences of inactivity; the promotion of good mental health through physical activity; and the associated risks of not maintaining a healthy weight. References are provided and statistical data are presented in charts and graphs throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Health promotion, Health statistics, Mental health, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness

Hankinson SE, Colditz GA, Manson JE, Speizer F, Manson JE, eds. 2001. Healthy women, healthy lives: A guide to preventing disease from the landmark Nurses' Health Study. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster, 546 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information from the Nurses' Health Study on a woman's probability of developing specific diseases and suggests how that probability may change with certain alterations in diet, weight control, physical activity, and other lifestyle changes. Part one discusses the Nurses' Health Study and what observations have been made by researchers and what they mean to the study of women's health issues. Part two provides information and suggestions on lowering the risk of diseases. Topics covered include coronary heart disease, different types of cancers, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, age-related eye disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The third part provides information on changing behaviors including physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and pain relievers. The appendices give information on types of epidemiological studies; being an informed consumer of health information; and a section on tables on weight and nutrition. The book concludes with a glossary, selected readings, and an index.

Contact: Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas , New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (212) 698-7000 Web Site: http://www.simonsays.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-684-85519-4.

Keywords: Alcohols, Alzheimers disease, Analgesic drugs, Antiinflammatory drugs, Arthritis, Asthma, Breast cancer, Cancer, Colon cancer, Coronary care, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Eye diseases, Family planning, Food, Hormone replacement therapy, Life cycle, Lung cancer, Menopause, Minerals, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Ovarian cancer, Physical activity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Reproductive health, Research programs, Skin cancers, Smoking, Strokes, Vitamins, Weight management, Women's health, Women's health promotion

Dowling J, Murphy SE. 2001. Summary report: 2001 Arizona women's health survey. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona Department of Health Services,Office of Women's and Children's Health, 90 pp.

Annotation: This summary report presents the findings of the 2001 Arizona Women's Health Survey (AWHS) for the purpose of furthering the state's ability to plan and develop initiatives that will positively impact women's health. Topics include the survey methodology; need-based utilization of services; health care access; health care information sources; patient health history; physical activity and exercise; mental outlook and emotional support; nutrition and eating habits; and physical and sociodemographic characteristics. Two additional sections discuss issues and concerns and references. The appendices present a demographic profile of AWHS respondents; respondents by county; and a copy of the survey form. Extensive statistical data are presented in table, chart, and graph formats throughout the report. A document on the 2002 survey is also available.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Arizona, Health statistics, Health surveys, Nutrition, Physical fitness, State programs, Women's health

U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2000. Nutrition and your health: Dietary guidelines for Americans. (5th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 39 pp. (Home and garden bulletin; no. 232)

Annotation: This publication provides tips to help children two years and older and adults use the national dietary guidelines to achieve fitness and good nutrition to maintain good health. It discusses healthy weights, physical activity, keeping food safe, and ways to make healthy food choices. It includes a list of resources for additional nutrition-related information.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary guidelines, Nutrition education, Physical fitness, Weight management

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Education. 2000. Promoting better health for young people through physical activity and sports: A report to the President from the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of Education. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the problem of physical inactivity among the nation's youth and presents ten strategies developed to promote better health for the nation's youth through physical activity and sports. The strategies are grouped under the broad headings of: families; school programs; afterschool care programs; youth sports and recreation programs; community structural environment; media campaigns; and monitoring youth physical activity and fitness and school and community programs. The report concludes with a call to action. References are included.

Contact: Healthy Youth, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (888) 282-7681 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Health promotion, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Sports

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.