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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (102 total).

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide summarizes recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

Shuell J. 2016. State quality rating and improvement systems: Strategies to support achievement of healthy eating and physical activity practices in early care and education settings. Washington, DC: Nemours Foundation, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report provides data, recommendations, and case study examples of how to more effectively use state Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a lever for change in childhood obesity prevention. The report focuses on four strategies to prevent childhood obesity: healthy eating, breastfeeding, physical activity, and limited screen time (HEPA). Contents include information from 24 states that have identified practices related to HEPA that states want to promote via their QRIS. Case studies from seven states (Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin) highlight strategies to support childhood obesity prevention efforts in early childhood education settings.

Contact: Nemours National Office of Policy & Prevention, 1201 15th Street, N.W., Suite 210, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 457-1440 Fax: (202) 649-4418 Web Site: http://www.nemours.org/about/policy.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Case studies, Child care centers, Child development centers, Disease prevention, Early childhood education, Health promotion, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State surveys, Young children

Piekarz E, Schermbeck R, Young SK, Leider J, Ziemann M, Chriqui JF. 2016. School district wellness policies: Evaluating progress and potential for improving children's health eight years after the federal mandate–Volume 4. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 184 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reports key findings from a comprehensive, ongoing, nationwide evaluation of written school district wellness policies. Contents include data from school years 2006–2007 through 2013–2014, the first eight years following the required implementation data for wellness policies. Topics include background on the federal requirement for school district wellness policies, methodology for assessing policy strength and district characteristics, comprehensiveness and strength of wellness policies, key findings of wellness policy provisions, and future research needs.

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, 5th Floor, Chicago, IL 60608-1264, Telephone: (312) 996-7222 Secondary Telephone: (866) 757-4507 Fax: (312) 996-2703 E-mail: IHRPinfo@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health policy, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Regulations, Research, School districts, School food services, Trends

SHAPE America. 2016. Answering frequently asked questions about adapted physical education. Reston, VA: SHAPE America, 20 pp.

Annotation: This guidance document answers common questions about providing physical education services for students with disabilities. The document was developed as a resource for physical educators, adapted physical educators, school district administrators, and parents as they work to provide consistent adapted physical education services for students with disabilities. Contents include descriptions of advocacy resources, legal guidelines, teaching tips, and commonly used motor assessments.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessments, Disabilities, Learning, Legal definitions, Motor development, Physical activity, Physical education, Resources for professionals, School districts, Service delivery systems, Students, Teaching

Salud America. 2016. 4 easy steps to push for open use at your school. San Antonio, TX: Salud America!, 2 pp. (Salud America toolkit)

Annotation: This toolkit provides step-by-step instructions for initiating a conversation with school district leaders about "open use," a policy that allows free community access to school district property for individual play and physical activity without a partnership or agreement with another public entity or a third party. The toolkit also links to resources such as community examples of open use policy (or shared use agreement; a model open use policy for school districts; and an active spaces research review, issue brief, and infographics.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Boards of education, Child health, Community action, Health policy, Health promotion, Models, Physical activity, Policy development, School districts

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2016. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #8: Physical activity. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 26 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #9: Physical activity--percent of children ages 6 though 11 and adolescents 12 through 17 who are physically active at least 60 minutes per day. It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Children, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Fobbs E, Grady K, Chiang RJ, Zavacky F. 2015. State school health policy matrix 2.0. [Atlanta, GA]: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors; [Washington, DC]: National Association of State Boards of Education; [Reston, VA]: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide outlines state-level school health policies related to competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in the school environment. Contents include a direct link to the policy and information about which political entity or agency adopted the policy or issued guidance.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drugs, Health policy, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, School food services, Schools, Service delivery systems

Special Olympics. 2014-. Project UNIFY toolkit. Washington, DC: Special Olympics,

Annotation: This toolkit provides resources to help schools implement Project UNIFY, an initiative that focuses on social inclusion that brings youth with and without intellectual disabilities together through sports and related activities. The resources describe Project UNIFY's vision, its major components, how to get started, implementation models, the connection to equal education and inclusion, evaluation reports, and the project's impact.

Contact: Special Olympics, 1133 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3604, Telephone: (202) 628-3630 Secondary Telephone: (800) 700-8585 Fax: (202) 824-0200 E-mail: info@specialolympics.org Web Site: http://www.specialolympics.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Physical fitness, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Inclusive schools, Information services, Mental retardation, School health programs, Sports

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

2014. Disability and health. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials,

Annotation: This web page links to resources that provide an overview of the barriers and challenges that people with disabilities face when accessing preventive health and health promotion services. Also included are 10 case studies developed by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) that provide a snapshot of what state public health departments are doing to address the health needs of people with disabilities.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Barriers, Community programs, Developmental disabilities, Disabilities, Health promotion, Physical disabilities

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

Action for Healthy Kids. 2014. Game On: An Every Kid Healthy tool. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes an online program that provides best practices and resources for creating a school wellness program with the ultimate goal of becoming certified as a healthy school. Contents include steps for energizing school staff, students, and families. Topics include gathering a team, assessing and tracking progress, creating a multi-year plan, finding challenges, building awareness, revising district policy, and receiving recognition.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Awards, Families, Health promotion, Model programs, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, School age children, School districts, School health programs, School personnel, Schools, Students

Society of Health and Physical Educators and Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2013–. Let's Move Active Schools. Reston, VA: Society of Health and Physical Educators; New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation,

Annotation: These resources are designed to help individuals and school communities ensure that 60 minutes of physical activity per day is the norm for students. Topics include what it takes for teachers, administrators, and other school staff to make their school an active school and how parents and community leaders can get involved as champions for an active school. Stories and information about selected programs, resources, professional development, and funding opportunities are available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Community action, Financing, Health promotion, National initiatives, Physical activity, Physical education, Program development, School age children, School health, Schools, Students, Technical assistance, Training

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.