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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (308 total).

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. n.d.. Mi futuro será brillante: Actividad física y alimentación saludable—para mujeres adultas. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to encourage Spanish-speaking adult women to increase current levels of physical activity, healthy eating, and to communicate with their health care providers to set goals for behavioral changes. It is a companion to the online guide, a set of 10 tip sheets which expand on the topics and provide practical information, ideas, and activities to help women adopt healthy behaviors to reach their goals.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Consumer education materials, Exercise, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Spanish language materials, Women's health

National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness. n.d.. Health tips for families series. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness, 13 items.

Annotation: These fact sheets for families in Head Start programs cover a variety of health topics related to children. Topics include active play, health literacy, understanding and using health information, healthy breathing at home (asthma prevention), healthy eating, mental health, oral health, and safety and injury prevention. The materials are available in Amharic, Arabic, Armenian, Burmese, Chinese, English, Hmong, Marshallese, Polish, Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Yiddish.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Child safety, Consumer education materials, Families, Head Start, Health literacy, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Physical activity, Play, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Young children

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2018. 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee scientific report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign. [2017?]. Framework for action: Addressing nutrition and physical activity through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a supplement to “State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action.” This supplement provides more detailed recommendations for supporting nutrition and physical activity during the school day through the Every Student Succeeds Act implementation.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org

Keywords: Nutrition, Adolescent health, Child health, Physical activity, School age children, School health programs, Students

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PRAMStat System. 2017. Prevalence of selected maternal and child health indicators–United States, all sites, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2012 and 2013. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This document reports the prevalence of selected maternal and child health indicators. Topics include nutrition and physical activity, prepregnancy weight, substance use, intimate partner violence, depression, pregnancy intention and family planning, health care services, oral health, health insurance status, infant sleep practices, and breastfeeding practices.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Body weight, Depression, Domestic violence, Family planning, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Nutrition, Oral health, Physical activity, Population surveillance, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Puerperium, Safety, Sleep position, Substance use behavior

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Increasing physical education and physical activity: A framework for schools 2017. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document explains the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) framework for school physical education and physical activity and identifies key professional development opportunities and resources to help schools implement this framework.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph

Keywords: Physical activity, Physical education, School programs, Schools

National Physical Activity Plan Alliance. 2016. National physical activity plan. [Columbia, SC]: National Physical Activity Plan,

Annotation: This U.S. National Physical Activity Plan is a comprehensive set of policies, programs, and initiatives designed to increase physical activity in all segments of the U.S. population. The Plan aims to foster a national culture that supports physically active lifestyles. Its ultimate purpose is to improve health, prevent disease and disability, and enhance quality of life. It provides recommendations for nine societal sectors: business and industry; community, recreation, fitness, and parks; education; faith-based settings; healthcare; mass media; public health; sport; and transportation, land use, and community design.

Contact: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 921 Assembly Street, Suite 212, Columbia, SC 29208, Telephone: (866) 365-5122 Fax: (803) 777-2504 E-mail: info@physcialactivityplan.org Web Site: http://www.physicalactivityplan.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Communities, Education, Health care, Health promotion, Industry, Initiatives, Mass media, Physical activity, Programs, Public health, Sports

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Physical activity in kids and teens: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This breif is designed to help families find websites and learn more about physical activity and kids and teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Recreation, Special health care needs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016. Winnable battles final report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report describes public health priorities with large-scale impact on health, known effective strategies to address them, and progress towards meeting targeted goals. Contents include visual representations of progress and data trends, as well as summaries of federal contributions associated with each of the following topic areas: tobacco; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; food safety; health care-associated infections; motor vehicle injuries; adolescent pregnancy; and HIV.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Food safety, Goals, HIV, Health, Infections, Motor vehicle safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Tobacco use, Treatments, Trends

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, Report Card Research Advisory Committee. 2016. The 2016 United States report card on physical activity for children and youth. Columbia, SC: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 38 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.).

Annotation: This document presents the results of a comprehensive evaluation of the physical activity levels and the indicators influencing physical activity of children and youth in the United States. Contents include the methodology, abbreviations and definitions, benefits and guidelines for routine physical activity, and a summary of indicators and grades. Topics include overall physical activity, sedentary behaviors, active transportation, organized sport participation, active play, health-related fitness, family and peers, school, community and the built environment, and government strategies and investments. Data sources and references are included.

Contact: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 921 Assembly Street, Suite 212, Columbia, SC 29208, Telephone: (866) 365-5122 Fax: (803) 777-2504 E-mail: info@physcialactivityplan.org Web Site: http://www.physicalactivityplan.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Environmental influences, Health behaviors, Health policy, Physical activity, Statistical data

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Shuell J. 2016. State quality rating and improvement systems: Strategies to support achievement of healthy eating and physical activity practices in early care and education settings. Washington, DC: Nemours Foundation, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report provides data, recommendations, and case study examples of how to more effectively use state Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a lever for change in childhood obesity prevention. The report focuses on four strategies to prevent childhood obesity: healthy eating, breastfeeding, physical activity, and limited screen time (HEPA). Contents include information from 24 states that have identified practices related to HEPA that states want to promote via their QRIS. Case studies from seven states (Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin) highlight strategies to support childhood obesity prevention efforts in early childhood education settings.

Contact: Nemours National Office of Policy & Prevention, 1201 15th Street, N.W., Suite 210, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 457-1440 Fax: (202) 649-4418 Web Site: http://www.nemours.org/about/policy.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Case studies, Child care centers, Child development centers, Disease prevention, Early childhood education, Health promotion, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State surveys, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.