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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

Postpartum Progress. n.d.. Clinical tools for postpartum depression. [no place]: Postpartum Progress, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for clinicians involved in the care of pregnant and postpartum women include position papers, algorithms, toolkits, guidelines for treatment, screening tools, research on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, professional organizations, training and continuing education, books, and other resources. Information and peer support for pregnant and new moms with postpartum depression and other mental illnesses related to pregnancy and childbirth are also available from the website.

Contact: Postpartum Progress, E-mail: postpartumprogress@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.postpartumprogress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Mental disorders, Mental health, Perinatal bereavement, Perinatal health, Perinatal influences, Postpartum care, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Puerperal disorders, Resources for professionals, Women's health

State Infant Mortality Collaborative. 2013-. State infant mortality (SIM) toolkit: A standardized approach for examining infant mortality. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit presents lessons learned from the State Infant Mortality Collaborative including experiences of and guidance from five teams relevant to the analysis and interpretation of perinatal data. Topics include the importance of infant mortality as a key indicator of population health, selecting indicators of infant mortality and data sources, methodological and statistical approaches to analyzing data and interpreting findings, and translating findings into programs and policies.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Data, Infant mortality, Information dissemination, Model programs, Needs assessment, Perinatal influences, Policy development, State MCH programs

CityMatCH. 2012. The Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach for preventing infant mortality in US urban communities. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a community approach and an analytic framework for investigating and addressing high infant mortality rates in urban settings. The fact sheet describes the development of the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach and how it is used to monitor progress, (surveillance), guide public health planning, and prioritize prevention activities. Related resources including training materials, a learning network, presentations, data tables, and publications are available from the website.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Data analysis, Infant mortality, Interdisciplinary approach, Perinatal influences, Planning, Urban environment

South Dakota Department of Health, Oral Health Program. 2010. Healthy smiles for two. Pierre, SD: South Dakota Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brochure presents tips for women on oral hygiene and oral health care during and after pregnancy. Topics include the importance of visiting the dentist early in pregnancy, eating healthy foods, drinking water with fluoride, avoiding adverse impacts of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, and avoiding tobacco products.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Dental hygiene, Educational materials, Infant health, Oral health, Perinatal influences, Pregnancy, Women's health

Gilbert CS, Robinson LK. 2009. PPOR (Perinatal Periods of Risk Approach). [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This archived webcast comprises videos and transcripts from a data skills session at the MCH Epi Conference held on December 9-11, 2009, in Tampa, Florida. It describes the purpose and scope of the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach to reducing infant mortality. Topics include the importance of analytic and community readiness and how PPOR can be used in combination with other efforts. Additional topics include data preparation and analysis, data sources and their strengths and weaknesses, PPOR validation studies, and suggestions for evaluating local PPOR efforts and effectively communicating results. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Data analysis, Data sources, Evaluation methods, Infant mortality, Interdisciplinary approach, Perinatal influences, Planning, Training

Crawford J. 2006. Helping patients understand the importance of oral health before and during pregnancy. Tulsa, OK: PennWell, 2 pp.

Annotation: This material is intended for use by oral health professionals in developing collaborative relationships with medical professionals. Topics include (1) what effects hormonal changes have on the oral tissues of pregnant women, (2) why it is important for women to maintain oral health during the childbearing years, (3) signs of gum disease, and (4) what women can do to eliminate the risk of pregnancy complications from oral infections. Additional resources are also presented. The two-page handout contains one full-color illustration of a woman who is pregnant and her developing fetus. Two smaller illustrations depict gum disease and microorganisms from gum infections in the blood that have migrated to the amniotic fluid. This material, along with two sample letters and bibliographies intended for use by oral health professionals in communicating with medical professionals about a mutual client, were developed as implementation tools to accompany the November 2006 issue of Grand Rounds in Oral-Systemic Medicine. The issue focused on periodontal disease in women of childbearing age.

Contact: PennWell, 1421 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa, OK 74112, Telephone: (800) 331-4463 Secondary Telephone: (918) 835-3161 E-mail: Headquarters@PennWell.com Web Site: http://www.pennwell.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Oral health, Patient care management, Perinatal influences, Periodontal disease, Pregnant women

Peck MG, Abreasch CJ, Simpson PS, eds. 2005. Profiles of perinatal HIV prevention: Urban communities share their efforts to prevention mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 44 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is designed for use by communities as a starting point to implement local systems to prevent perinatal HIV transmission, introduces the Urban Prevention Collaborative (UPC) and the Urban Learning Network, both of which work toward prevention of perinatal HIV transmission. Themes and recommendations from the UPC are presented, along with commentary from City MatCH. A table of prevention strategies is included, and descriptions of programs run by health departments in several states are presented. The publication includes one appendix: a CityMatCH mapping AIDS prevention strategies overview.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Disease transmission, HIV, Perinatal influences, Prevention, Urban MCH programs

CityMatCH. 2005. Preventing perinatal transmission of HIV AIDS. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This webcast on the prevention of the perinatal transition of HIV AIDS was held on February 17, 2005. The webcast featured three presenters: (1) Margaret Lampe, from the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention-Epidemiology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who discussed Rapid HIV-1 testing for women in labor with unknown HIV status; (2) Ana Rua-Dobles, from the HUG-Me Program in Orlando, FL, who presented on the perinatal nurse's role in the prevention of HIV vertical transmission; and (3) Jackie Nash, Regional HIV/AIDS Prevention Coordinator, Duval County Health Dept. in Jacksonville, FL, who talked about Florida's Targeted Outreach for Pregnant Women Act Program (TOPWA). The complete audio recording, along with all three powerpoint presentations, are available online. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, AIDS, Disease prevention, Disease transmission, Florida, HIV, HIV screening, Infant health, Maternal health, Perinatal influences, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal care, State programs

Alexander GR, Nabukera S, Bader D, Slay-Wingate M. [2003]. Infant mortality assessment manual. Birmingham, AL: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This manual outlines a process for analyzing and interpreting perinatal-related data that will inform needs assessment and program development efforts. Contents include sample analyses using data from the United States and Alabama to provide a framework for selecting appropriate indicators, analyzing data, interpreting findings, and developing community interventions. The manual highlights indicators of infant mortality including definitions and data sources, demonstrates methodological and statistical approaches to analyzing the data and interpreting the findings, and offers recommendations for agencies working to reduce infant mortality.

Contact: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Maternal and Child Health, RPHB 320, 1530 Third Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, Telephone: (205) 934-7161 Fax: (205) 934-8248 Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Data analysis, Epidemiology, Infant mortality, MCH programs, Needs assessment, Perinatal influences, Program development

Peck M, Sappenfield B, Haynatzka V. 2003. Perinatal periods of risk analysis: Using local, state and national data. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 67 pp.

Annotation: This archived webcast comprises presentation slides and notes from the 2003 MCH Epi Conference. It describes the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) Approach and the effective use of local, state, and national data. Topics include the strengths and limitations of using National Center for Health Statistics data to assess feto-infant mortality; results from an analysis using PPOR to assess feto-infant mortality in U.S. cities, urban counties, states, and the U.S. as a whole for selected periods of time; and recommendations and options for using PPOR in the future. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Data analysis, Epidemiology, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Perinatal influences

Niswander KR, Gordon M. 1972. The women and their pregnancies: The Collaborative Perinatal Study of the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, National Institutes of Health; for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, 540 pp., 2 microfiche.

Annotation: This is the first publication of the results of the Collaborative Perinatal Study of the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stoke; the study was undertaken from 1959 to 1965. The study was conducted to examine the range and etiology of perinatal death, and to identify areas for intervention or for more specific research. This report describes the design of the study; presents the characteristics and conditions of the pregnancies studied, and provides the framework necessary for understanding the further detailed development of specific areas of information. Two microfiche inserted into a pocket pasted in the inside back cover present data on characteristics and conditions of pregnancy, by institution.

Keywords: Birth injuries, Infant mortality, Nervous system diseases, Perinatal influences, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Statistics

Hardy JB, ed. 1971. Proceedings of a symposium on factors affecting the growth and development of children, March 30, 1970. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press, 166 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings discuss a project to clarify relationships between perinatal influences and minor impairment of central nervous system function. It also discusses causative factors responsible for the known relationship between poverty and higher frequency of cerebral defects, particularly of a milder degree. Perinatal influences discussed are gestational age and birth weight of the fetus, serum bilirubin levels of newborns, full-term neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, cord serum immunoglobulin levels and long-range fetal outcome. The symposium was conducted by the Johns Hopkins Collaborative Perinatal Project, supported in part by the U.S. Children's Bureau.

Keywords: Brain damage, Central nervous system diseases, Child development, Fetal development, Perinatal influences

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1965. The child with central nervous system deficit: Report of two symposiums. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 149 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 432-1965)

Annotation: This report consists of papers delivered at two symposia sponsored the University of Pennsylvania, the Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association, and the Children's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report discusses children with central nervous system deficit, dual sensory role of muscle spindles, basic mechanisms of motor learning, postural integration at spinal levels, predisposing genetic and metabolic factors in developmental defects of the central nervous system, perinatal problems and the central nervous system, attitudinal reflex, normal motor development, variations and abnormalities of motor development, some considerations of muscle activity, plasticity of the nervous system of early childhood, mental retardation and the child with central nervous system deficit, patient evaluation, evaluation in the assessment of motor performance, tests and evaluation tools for the child with central nervous system deficit, cerebral palsy, physiology of sensation, and mechanisms in the control of movement. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Central nervous system diseases, Cerebral palsy, Children, Evaluation, Genetic disorders, Mental retardation, Metabolic diseases, Motor skills, Movement disorders, Neuromuscular diseases, Perinatal influences, Sensory impairments

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.