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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

National Cancer Institute. 2016. Research-tested intervention programs (RTIPs). Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes an online, searchable database designed to provide program planners and public health practitioners with easy and immediate access to evidence-based cancer control interventions and program materials. Contents include key features, criteria for inclusion, and program review process. Featured program areas include breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening; diet and nutrition; HPV vaccination; informed decision making; obesity; physical activity; sun safety; public health genomics; survivorship/supportive care; and tobacco control.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 12-7617.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Colon cancer, Decision making, Disease prevention, Family support programs, Genomics, Human papillomavirus, Informed consent, Nutrition, Obesity, Online databases, Peer support programs, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Screening, Smoking, Sun exposure, Survivors, Tobacco use, Vaccines

National Cancer Institute. 2015–. Adolescents and young adults with cancer. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about cancer in adolescents and young adults ages 15–39. Topics include types of cancers in young people, finding a doctor and hospital, treatment choices, coping and support, after treatment, and organizations serving adolescents and young adults. Reports, research, literature, and a quiz are also available.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Cancer, Consumer education materials, Disease management, Family support services, Financial support, Peer support programs, Research, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs, Young adults

Ferry G, Ireys H, Peterson D, Zickafoose J. 2014. How are CHIPRA quality demonstration states designing and implementing caregiver peer support programs?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp., suppl. (1 p.). (National evaluation of the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant Program: Evaluation highlight no. 7)

American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress; National Council of La Raza. 2014. Peer support in health: Evidence to action–An expert panel of the National Peer Support Collaborative Learning Network. Leawood, KS: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes discussions from a national conference held on November 12–13, 2013, in Washington, DC, to discuss current strengths and future needs in the field of peer support. Contents include key findings, background and review of the evidence, and key features of peer support. Topics include conceptual and strategic issues, program development, evaluation of peer support, organizational and system issues, and program sustainability. Recommendations and areas for future work are included.

Contact: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 440, Leawood, KS 66211-2672, Telephone: (800) 274-2237 Secondary Telephone: (913) 906-6000 Fax: (913) 906-6095 Web Site: http://peersforprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community based services, Community health aides, Conference proceedings, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health care delivery, International programs, Model programs, Peer counseling, Peer education, Peer groups, Peer support programs, Program development, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Public health programs, Quality assurance, Service delivery systems, Service integration, Sustainability, Systems development

Attendance Works. 2014. The power of positive connections: Reducing chronic absence through PEOPLE–Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement. [no place]: Attendance Works, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides recommendations for schools and community partners for preventing chronic absence and outlines key steps for implementing a Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement (PEOPLE) strategy. Topics include identifying students and families most at risk and helping them build positive relationships that promote regular attendance in conjunction with a broader approach to nurturing a school-wide culture of attendance. The appendix offers specific tips to help district, school, and community leaders advance the approach.

Contact: Attendance Works, Web Site: http://www.attendanceworks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community action, Community participation, Family school relations, Family support, Outreach, Peer support programs, Policy development, Relationships, School age children, School attendance, Students

Copeland ME. 2014. Taking action: A mental health recovery self-help educational program. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 155 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum is a self-care and recovery educational program for state, county, and local behavioral health delivery systems; for-profit and not-for-profit organizations; volunteer groups; support groups; peer support groups; and peer-run programs. Its purpose is to implement educational programs in self-help concepts, skills, and strategies for adults with mental health issues and/or for adults with mental health issues who also may have substance use issues. The goal of the project is to promote wellness, stability, recovery, and life transformation. Contents include information about program administration, curriculum implementation, facilitator training, and descriptions of sessions.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Curricula, Educational programs, Health behavior, Health education, Mental health, Peer education, Peer support programs, Self care, Substance use behavior, Training

American Institutes for Research. 2013. Improving emotional and behavioral outcomes for LGBT children/youth: A strategic planning tool (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 8 pp.

Annotation: This strategic-planning tool is intended to help support efforts of those working in organizations and communities to identify action to improve services and supports for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children and adolescents and their families. The tool includes a table organized around 10 standards of care that provide a framework for improving outcomes and well-being of LGBT children and adolescents. The standards include (1) assessment and continuous quality improvement, (2) nondscrimination policies, (3) staff knowledge and development, (4) documentation, data collection, and information sharing, (5) safe, supportive environments, (6) practices that affirm identity, (7) healthy and supportive peer connections, (8) family connections, (9) access to affirming services and supports, and (10) community outreach and engagement.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (877) 334-3499 Fax: (202) 403-5454 E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://www.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Adolescents, Communities, Data, Families, Family support services, Homosexuality, Outreach, Peer support programs, Public policy, Quality assurance, Social support, social services

Shealy KR, Li R, Benton-Davis S, Grummer-Strawn LM. 2005. The CDC guide to breastfeeding interventions. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, 67 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose a breastfeeding intervention that best meets their needs. Included in the guide are all types of breastfeeding interventions that have been received by the Cochrane Collaboration and published through the Cochrane Library. The chapters in the guide are divided into two sections based on evidence for effectiveness. In the first section, the evidence is significant; in the second, it is limited. Section 1 includes the following categories: (1) maternity care practices, support for breastfeeding in the workplace, (3) peer support, (4) educating mothers, (5) professional support, and (6) media and social marketing. Section 2 includes the following categories:(1) countermarketing and the WHO International Code, (2) professional education, (3) public acceptance, and (4) hotlines and other information resources. A list of references is included. The guide includes two appendices: (1) expert panel and (2) glossary.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Education, Evidence based medicine, Hotlines, Interventions, Literature reviews, Marketing, Peer support programs, Working mothers

Grantmakers in Health. 2004. Addressing maternal depression. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides information about maternal depression. The fact sheet discusses the prevalence of maternal depression, its impact, and treatment. Opportunities for grantmakers in the following areas are also discussed: educating women about maternal depression, promoting screening and treatment, integrating mental health services into programs serving pregnant and parenting women, increasing the availability of peer support for mothers who are experiencing depression, and supporting research on maternal depression. A list of sources is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Education, Mental health services, Mothers, Peer support programs, Postpartum depression, Pregnant women, Screening, Treatment, Women's health

Roman L. 2001. Improving the Health and Development of Low-Income Pregnant Women: [Final report]. Grand Rapids, MI: Spectrum Health, 49 pp.

Annotation: The goal of the study was to evaluate MOMS (Mothers Offering Mothers Support), an intervention program that uses a peer support team consisting of a case management nurse, a paid health advocate, and volunteer mothers. The peer support network maintains weekly contact with low-income pregnant women at clinics, in homes, and in a variety of community locations. The study compared women who received the current standard of care provided by prenatal and maternal support services with women who received care through MOMS. Data on stress, depression, social support, life course development, health risk behavior, self-esteem, parenting and infant development, and mastery were collected for 500 women at 4 different clinic sites. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107488.

Keywords: Community Health Aides, Community Health workers, Community Integrated Service System program, Health Education, MCH Research, Paraprofessional Personnel, Paraprofessional Personnel, Peer Support Programs, Pregnant Women, Pregnant Women, Research, Support Groups

WIC Works Resource System. 1996-. Loving support makes breastfeeding work. Beltsville, MD: WIC Works Resource System,

Annotation: This electronic resource provides information and materials developed as part of the Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work promotion campaign, a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service and Best Start Social Marketing Inc. The resource includes links to community-based programs that are implementing the Loving Support program; tools to help communities promote breastfeeding; and downloadable pamphlets that offer guidance and support for breastfeeding mothers. Materials are available in English and Spanish. Some materials are intended for Native American audiences and portray Native Americans in the illustrations. The site also provides a link to the USDA's WIC Works Resource System which provides online training and education materials on breastfeeding for staff of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC).

Contact: WIC Works Resource System, National Agricultural Library, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705, Telephone: (301) 504-6096 E-mail: wicworks@ars.usda.gov Web Site: http://wicworks.nal.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Community programs, Consumer education materials, Health promotion, Media campaigns, Model programs, Nutrition, Peer support programs, Social support, Spanish language materials

Poyadue F. 1994 (ca.). National Center on Parent-Directed Family Resource Centers [Final report]. Santa Clara, CA: Parents Helping Parents, Inc., 34 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to create a system for Parent-Directed Family Resource Centers (PDFRCs) and assist others to develop and institutionalize this system. PDFRCs offered a comprehensive (one-stop shopping) array of family resources and support programs to a local area (cities, counties, and parishes). The project objectives included developing a series of "how to" manuals on initiating and institutionalizing PDFRCs and developing 15 self-teaching packets on replicating Parents Helping Parents, Inc., programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-187026.

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Families, Information Systems, National Information Resource Centers, National Programs, Parent Networks, Parent Support Groups, Parent Support Services, Parents, Peer Counseling

Heustis J, Kressley KG, Greer M, Klein S. 1993. Parent liaison training manual: A resource guide for parent educators working within medical and social work teams. Indianapolis, IN: Indianapolis Parent Information Network, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This training manual complements the skills of parent liaisons, parents of children with special health needs who work within a medical and social work team to assist other families to become more effective caregivers for their own children with special health needs. This guide aims to increase the parent liaison's understanding of families and how they cope with special issues; enhance their communication and problem-solving strategies; and clarify their roles and responsibilities. Resources include a bibliography; a glossary of medical, disability and education terms; fact sheets about medical conditions; reprints of some of the additional readings; and resource directories. Each topic area includes case studies, instructional activities, and suggested readings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Coping, Families, Parenting, Parents, Peer support programs

Alliance of Genetic Support Groups. 1990. National conference on peer support training: Program and abstracts. Washington, DC: Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, ca.100 pp.

Annotation: This document presents abstracts of presentations made at the National Conference on Peer Support Training held March 31-April 1, 1990 in Washington, D.C. Sessions covered an introduction to peer support, peer helping skills and knowledge base, and fundamentals of peer support training programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHD029.

Keywords: Conferences, Genetic disorders, Peer support programs, Training

Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Planning Committee for the National Conference on Peer Support Training for Genetic Support Groups. 1990. Peer support resource guide. Washington, DC: Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, ca.100 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide was prepared for the National Conference on Peer Support Training held March 31-April 1, 1990 in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the guide is to place a collection of useful resources relevant to training peer helpers in the hands of both volunteers and professionals in genetic support groups who might be inspired to undertake the task of conducting a peer helper training program. Peer support implies a one-to one relationship between two people that involves sharing information, ideas, and experiences, offering support, and validating emotional responses. A peer helper is someone who has dealt with a crisis constructively or who is coping successfully with a chronic problem. The four sections of the resource guide include reviews of books, articles, and manuals related to training peer helpers, responses to a survey of of organizations with peer helper training programs, basic information about genetics, and additional sources of information related to genetic support groups and peer support. Additional funding for the peer support conference and the resource guide was provided by the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation and Roche Biomedical Laboratories. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Contact E-mail: alliance@capaccess.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Print copy available from the publisher. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHD028.

Keywords: Conferences, Genetic disorders, Peer support programs, Training

Creighton A, Kivel P. 1990. Helping teens stop violence: A practical guide for counselors, educators, and parents. Alameda, CA: Hunter House, 152 pp.

Annotation: This guide is written primarily for educators and counselors who work with young adults about violence prevention. The book is divided into six sections. Section 1 gives a general overview about working with young people; Section 2 provides a basic theory about age, gender, and race-related power imbalances which cause violence; Section 3 suggests techniques for liberatory teaching; Section 4 is the actual curriculum used by the guide; Section 5 gives suggestions for training other adults in workshops on violence issues; and Section 6 provides strategies and techniques for establishing long-term support for young people dealing with abuse. Roleplays and exercises are included in each section. The appendix includes various consent forms, information forms, program pretests and post tests, and evaluations for participants and instructors.

Contact: Hunter House, P.O. Box 2914, Alameda, CA 94501, Telephone: (510) 865-5282 Secondary Telephone: (800) 266-5592 Fax: (510) 865-4295 E-mail: ordering@hunterhouse.com Web Site: http://www.hunterhouse.com/ $14.95. Document Number: ISBN 0-89793-116-7.

Keywords: Adolescents, Curricula, Dating, Emotional abuse, Injury prevention, Intervention, Peer support programs, Physical abuse, Violence, Violence prevention

Freeman SM. 1989. From peer pressure to peer support: Alcohol/drug prevention through group process: A curriculum for grades 7-12. Minneapolis, MN: Johnson Institute, 323 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum for grades 7-12 is designed to teach life skills through the group process, while transmitting sound information on alcohol and drugs. Both school and family systems are components in the learning process. The copy-ready activity pages can be used in homerooms, health, science and other classes, in awareness groups, support groups, and other group settings. The curriculum is divided into two parts. Part one lays the groundwork for alcohol and drug awareness programs including an overview of alcohol and drug use among adolescents and a listings of resources. Part two highlights program logistics and introduces group process concepts and stages (trust building, conflict resolution, and productivity) with suggested lesson plans and activities.

Contact: Johnson Institute, Executive Office, 613 Second Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 662-7104 Web Site: http://johnsoninstitute.org/Default.aspx $59.95 plus 7 percent shipping and handling.

Keywords: Curricula, Peer support programs, School health education, Substance abuse prevention

Fischhoff A. 1986. Birth to three: A self-help program for new parents. Eugene, OR: Castalia , 276 pp.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.