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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (36 total).

March of Dimes. n.d.. Healthy babies: Chance or choice? A peer education approach. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes, 48 pp.

Annotation: This volume presents a joint project of the March of Dimes and the Future Homemakers of America, which trains adolescent to provide peer education to other adolescents on the subject of preventing birth defects. It discusses reports from peer educators, the problem of birth defects, facts about preventable problems and project possibilities, suggestions for getting started, communication techniques, and a list of do's and don'ts. The volume is illustrated with photographs and drawings.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Congenital abnormalities, Peer education

Anderson B. n.d.. Collaboration Among Parents and Health Professionals (CAPP) [Final report]. Boston, MA: Federation for Children with Special Needs, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project worked with the Technical Assistance for Parent Programs Project and the U.S. Office of Special Education Resources in order to increase and enhance parent involvement in the health care of children with disabilities and special health needs. The project sought to (1) prepare parents to assume an integral role in the health care of their children with disabilities; (2) promote effective communication and collaboration among health care professionals and parents in order to enhance health services for children; and (3) develop a national support system to ensure that parents have access to essential information and peer support. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152940.

Keywords: 99-457 Financing Intervention, Early Association for the Care of Children's Health (ACCH) Parent Networks, Health Professionals, L, Parent Education Parent Professional Communication Peer Support P, Parents

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

National Cancer Institute. 2015–. Adolescents and young adults with cancer. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about cancer in adolescents and young adults ages 15–39. Topics include types of cancers in young people, finding a doctor and hospital, treatment choices, coping and support, after treatment, and organizations serving adolescents and young adults. Reports, research, literature, and a quiz are also available.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Cancer, Consumer education materials, Disease management, Family support services, Financial support, Peer support programs, Research, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs, Young adults

American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress; National Council of La Raza. 2014. Peer support in health: Evidence to action–An expert panel of the National Peer Support Collaborative Learning Network. Leawood, KS: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes discussions from a national conference held on November 12–13, 2013, in Washington, DC, to discuss current strengths and future needs in the field of peer support. Contents include key findings, background and review of the evidence, and key features of peer support. Topics include conceptual and strategic issues, program development, evaluation of peer support, organizational and system issues, and program sustainability. Recommendations and areas for future work are included.

Contact: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 440, Leawood, KS 66211-2672, Telephone: (800) 274-2237 Secondary Telephone: (913) 906-6000 Fax: (913) 906-6095 Web Site: http://peersforprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community based services, Community health aides, Conference proceedings, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health care delivery, International programs, Model programs, Peer counseling, Peer education, Peer groups, Peer support programs, Program development, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Public health programs, Quality assurance, Service delivery systems, Service integration, Sustainability, Systems development

Copeland ME. 2014. Taking action: A mental health recovery self-help educational program. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 155 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum is a self-care and recovery educational program for state, county, and local behavioral health delivery systems; for-profit and not-for-profit organizations; volunteer groups; support groups; peer support groups; and peer-run programs. Its purpose is to implement educational programs in self-help concepts, skills, and strategies for adults with mental health issues and/or for adults with mental health issues who also may have substance use issues. The goal of the project is to promote wellness, stability, recovery, and life transformation. Contents include information about program administration, curriculum implementation, facilitator training, and descriptions of sessions.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Curricula, Educational programs, Health behavior, Health education, Mental health, Peer education, Peer support programs, Self care, Substance use behavior, Training

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) champions: The local MCAH capacity building project experience. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a multi-year demonstration project to build local health department's (LHD's) technical knowledge and leadership abilities for maternal and child health through blended learning techniques including in-person capacity building trainings and virtual coaching, networking, and peer-to-peer sharing. Contents include information about the project framework and outcomes, participating LHDs, lessons learned, and recommendations for future capacity building projects is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Leadership, Local MCH programs, MCH training, Networking, Organizational change, Peer education, Public health infrastructure, Technical assistance, Work force

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2013. Media-smart youth. Rockville, MD: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active!®, an interactive after-school education program for youth ages 11 to 13. The curriculum combines media literacy and youth development principles and practices with up-to-date research findings and federal recommendations about nutrition and physical activity. Topics include empowering young people to be aware, and think critically about, media's role in influencing nutrition and physical activity choices; building skills to make informed decisions in daily life; establishing healthy habits for life; and learning about media and creating products to educate their peers.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, After school programs, Consumer education, Curricula, Health promotion, Leadership, Mass media, Media campaigns, National programs, Nutrition, Peer education, Physical activity

Benson PL, Scales PC, Leffert N, Roehlkepartain EC. 2011. A fragile foundation: The state of developmental assets among American youth (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 153 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of adolescents in terms of developmental assets. The findings are based on data from a survey—"Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors"—that measures 40 developmental assets, or positive factors. The document provides information about the following: the background assets and the young people surveyed; young people's experiences of developmental assets; the deficits and patterns of high risk behavior that compromise young people's healthy development; the power of assets in relation to risky behaviors; an overall goal for well-being; and creative tensions that address challenges and opportunities of the report. Each chapter includes text, figures, and tables of data by grade and gender. Appendices offer additional details of other demographic differences.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 0352.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Cultural factors, Decision making, Education, Families, High risk adolescents, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction, Statistics

Migrant Health Promotion. 2010. Supervision manual for Promotur(a) de Salud programs. Weslaco, TX: Migrant Health Promotion, 25 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to provide basic guidelines to supervisors of Promotor y Promotora de Salud programs, which use lay health educators to provide health information in migrant communities. The manual provides general information and information on hiring and supervision, training and motivation, and how to handle challenges. Sample forms and templates are also included. The manual is available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Hispanic Americans, Community health workers, Health services, Leadership. Health education, Manuals, Motivation, Peer education, Prevention, Programs, Spanish language materials, Supervision, Training

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2007. Teen survival guide: Health tips for on-the-go girls. Washington, DC: Office of Women's Health, U.S.Health Resources and Services Administration, 76 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is geared toward adolescent girls, provides health information presented in a reader-friendly manner. Topics covered include (1) taking care of your reproductive health, (2) taking care of a beautiful you, inside and out, (3) feeling good about yourself, (4) taking charge of your world, and (5) planning your future. A glossary is included.

Contact: National Women's Health Information Center, 8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031, Telephone: (800) 994-9662 Secondary Telephone: (888) 220-5446 Fax: (703) 560-6598 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Bullying, Careers, Consumer education materials, Families, Menstruation, Nutrition, Peer pressure, Physical activity, Reproductive health, Safety, Self-esteem, Sexually transmitted infections, Stress, Substance abuse

Shealy KR, Li R, Benton-Davis S, Grummer-Strawn LM. 2005. The CDC guide to breastfeeding interventions. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, 67 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose a breastfeeding intervention that best meets their needs. Included in the guide are all types of breastfeeding interventions that have been received by the Cochrane Collaboration and published through the Cochrane Library. The chapters in the guide are divided into two sections based on evidence for effectiveness. In the first section, the evidence is significant; in the second, it is limited. Section 1 includes the following categories: (1) maternity care practices, support for breastfeeding in the workplace, (3) peer support, (4) educating mothers, (5) professional support, and (6) media and social marketing. Section 2 includes the following categories:(1) countermarketing and the WHO International Code, (2) professional education, (3) public acceptance, and (4) hotlines and other information resources. A list of references is included. The guide includes two appendices: (1) expert panel and (2) glossary.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Education, Evidence based medicine, Hotlines, Interventions, Literature reviews, Marketing, Peer support programs, Working mothers

Scales PC, Leffert N. 2004. Developmental assets: A synthesis of the scientific research on adolescent development (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 279 pp.

Annotation: This book examines internal and external factors in the adolescent's successful psychosocial development. The authors describe the framework of their theory of development assets and then discuss each of the assets. External assets include: support assets; empowerment assets; boundaries-and-expectation assets; and constructive-use-of-time assets. Internal assets include: commitment-to-learning assets; positive values assets; social competency assets; and positive identity assets.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 338.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Decision making, Education, Families, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction

International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region. 2004. Peer to peer: Creating successful peer education programs. New York, NY: Western Hemisphere Region, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes the necessary steps to plan, implement, and evaluate a program to train youth to teach their peers about sexual and reproductive health (SRH). The guide contains adaptable tools to support program activities, as well as examples of SRH projects from International Planned Parenthood Federation World Hemisphere Region member associations in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Contact: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, 120 Wall Street, Ninth Floor , New York, NY 10005-3902, Telephone: (212) 248-6400 Fax: (212) 248-4221 E-mail: info@ippfwhr.org Web Site: http://www.ippfwhr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evaluation, International programs, Peer education, Program planning, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Youth

Grantmakers in Health. 2004. Addressing maternal depression. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides information about maternal depression. The fact sheet discusses the prevalence of maternal depression, its impact, and treatment. Opportunities for grantmakers in the following areas are also discussed: educating women about maternal depression, promoting screening and treatment, integrating mental health services into programs serving pregnant and parenting women, increasing the availability of peer support for mothers who are experiencing depression, and supporting research on maternal depression. A list of sources is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Education, Mental health services, Mothers, Peer support programs, Postpartum depression, Pregnant women, Screening, Treatment, Women's health

Manitoba Collaborative Project for the Prevention of Early Childhood Tooth Decay, Healthy Smile Happy Child Pilot Project. 2004. Prevent early childhood tooth decay: Action plan workbook and toolkit. Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada: Winnepeg Regional Health Authority,

Annotation: This workbook and toolkit use a community development approach to preventing early childhood caries (ECC). The workbook is designed to help community leaders build a team, find a target audience, learn about ECC, identify useful learning tools, and develop a community action plan. The toolkit contains additional information and resources on ECC, a list of suppliers, and materials and instructions for implementing anticipatory guidance "goody bags", Dental Bingo, the True/False game, the "So Sweet" bottles activity, and a Smile Fair. General handouts and teaching outlines for an ECC presentation and peer educator training are also included. The workbook and toolkit are available in English and in French. Some of the toolkit materials are also available in Cree.

Contact: Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, 1800-155 Carlton Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3C 4YI, Telephone: (204) 926-7000 Fax: (204) 926-7007 Web Site: http://www.wrha.mb.ca Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Dental care, Dental hygiene, Early childhood caries, Educational materials, Health promotion, Infants, Non English language materials, Oral health, Peer education, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Program development, Young children

Deinard A. 2002. Does Education Limit Lead Burden?: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 51 pp.

Annotation: Lead abatement is a costly and disruptive secondary prevention procedure that benefits only those who live in the abated home. Primary prevention interventions—which may be less expensive and reach more people—are necessary. This study assessed the efficacy of a community-based, intensive, culturally specific educational intervention for the primary prevention of lead burden. The study hypothesized that lead levels of children whose mothers received the intensive education will remain lower than those of children whose mothers receive basic education, and that mothers receiving the intervention will perform better on knowledge-based tests than will mothers who do not. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107491.

Keywords: American Indians, Asians-All others, Blacks, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infants, Lead Poisoning Prevention, Lead Poisoning Screening, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Parent Education, Parents, Peer Counseling, Preschool children, Research, Toddlers

Roman L. 2001. Improving the Health and Development of Low-Income Pregnant Women: [Final report]. Grand Rapids, MI: Spectrum Health, 49 pp.

Annotation: The goal of the study was to evaluate MOMS (Mothers Offering Mothers Support), an intervention program that uses a peer support team consisting of a case management nurse, a paid health advocate, and volunteer mothers. The peer support network maintains weekly contact with low-income pregnant women at clinics, in homes, and in a variety of community locations. The study compared women who received the current standard of care provided by prenatal and maternal support services with women who received care through MOMS. Data on stress, depression, social support, life course development, health risk behavior, self-esteem, parenting and infant development, and mastery were collected for 500 women at 4 different clinic sites. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107488.

Keywords: Community Health Aides, Community Health workers, Community Integrated Service System program, Health Education, MCH Research, Paraprofessional Personnel, Paraprofessional Personnel, Peer Support Programs, Pregnant Women, Pregnant Women, Research, Support Groups

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.