Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (23 total).

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2017. Availability, outcomes, and federal support related to pediatric trauma care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report describes what is known about the availability of trauma centers for children and the outcomes for children treated at different types of facilities. The report also examines how, if at all, federal agencies are involved in supporting pediatric trauma care and how these activities are coordinated. Topics include the location of high-level pediatric trauma centers, the percentage of children who live within 30 miles of a high-level pediatric trauma center, and how well such centers work to lower mortality. Additional topics include federal interagency coordination to support hospital-based pediatric trauma care activities and training and resources available to physicians and nurses for pediatric trauma care. Examples are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-17-334.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal agencies, Health care delivery, Injuries, Interagency cooperation, Outcome and process assessment, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Training, Trauma care, Trauma centers, Work force

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Provider networks: Comparison of child-focused network adequacy standards between CHIP and private health plans. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the inclusion of pediatric providers, including children's hospitals, in Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and qualified health plans (QHPs). Topics include federal and selected state CHIP and QHP adequacy standards, the extent to which selected issuers of CHIP plans and QHPs include children's hospitals and otherwise help ensure access to pediatric specialists, and how the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and selected states monitor CHIP plan and QHP compliance with adequacy standards.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-16-219.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children's Health Insurance Program, Health insurance, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Standards, Work force

Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2014. Checklist: Essential pediatric domains and considerations for every hospital's disaster preparedness policies. SIlver Spring, MD: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 27 pp.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help hospitals incorporate essential pediatric considerations into existing hospital disaster policies. It consists of 10 essential pediatric domains and corresponding considerations to guide hospital administrators, clinical managers, and disaster planning committees through a review of current disaster plans and inform policy development or revision. Additionally, a list of references and resources specific to each domain is provided to assist users in finding relevant literature and best practices. The checklist is available in both static and interactive electronic versions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Disaster planning, Evidence based medicine, Hospitals, Model programs, Pediatric care, Policy development, Resources for professionals

Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2013. Pediatric trauma resuscitation checklist tool kit. Silver Spring, MD: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 15 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit is designed to help hospitals adhere to the Advanced Trauma Life Support protocol by creating a checklist that can be used during pediatric trauma resuscitation. Contents include information on the benefits of checklists and guidance on how to modify, use, and implement the checklist. Additional content includes information on barriers to using the checklist, a flowchart, answers to frequently asked questions, a list of resources and references, a glossary, and acronyms. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advanced pediatric life support, Guidelines, Hospitals, Protocols, Trauma care

Hanson N, Hill KS. 2011. Defining the children's hospital role in child maltreatment. (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, 84 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines what a child protection team at a children’s hospital should offer in terms of infrastructure, staffing, functions, and systems to be considered either basic, advanced, or a center of excellence. The book discusses each of these three tiers, explaining how they serve as a framework for hospital self assessment and are not intended as a ranking for competitive evaluation. The first section covers medical leadership, team administration, and social work; the second section covers clinical services, policies, prevention, advocacy, community collaboration, education, and research; and the third section covers funding, reimbursement, and risk management. The benefit to the community is covered in a special section.

Contact: Children's Hospital Association, 600 13th Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 753-5500 Web Site: http://www.childrenshospitals.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child protective services, Child welfare, Maltreated children, Pediatric hospitals, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Social work

Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, Center for Healthier Communities. 2011. School/nurse coordination improves assessment compliance. [San Diego, CA]: Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, Center for Healthier Communities, 1 p. (Community health brief)

Annotation: This brief describes a partnership between a school district and a children's hospital to increase compliance with state law requiring all students in kindergarten and first grade entering public school for the first time to receive an oral health assessment. Contents include information about the district's contract with the hospital to provide the health team for its 10 elementary schools and preschool program, the standardized format and forms for data collection and reporting, and coordination and implementation of the oral-health-assessment plan (screening by volunteers and referral to the school nurse for follow-up care). Topics include the percentage of children identified with urgent, possible, and no oral concerns by school and compliance rates for select schools and the district as a whole.

Contact: Rady Children's Hopsital-San Diego, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123, Telephone: (858) 576-1700 Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Contract services, Dental caries, Elementary schools, Legal responsibility, Legislation, Local initiatives, Model programs, Nurses, Oral health, Pediatric hospitals, Referrals, Risk assessment, School age children, School districts, School health services, Screening, Statistical data

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. 2010. Coordinating pediatric medical care during an influenza pandemic: Hospital workbook. [Oak Ridge, TN]: Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, 81 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this workbook is to assist hospitals in the process of coordinating pediatric influenza-like illness medical care across a community during an influenza pandemic. The workbook lists six areas that children's hospitals should address when coordinating medical care for pediatric influenza-like illness and provides guidance about how to address each area.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Health care, Influenza, Pediatric hospitals, Service coordination

National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, FOCUS on a Fitter Future. 2010. Focus on a fitter future: Survival guide -- planning, building, and sustaining a pediatric obesity program. [Alexandria, VA]: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, 64 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides strategies for institutions working to prevent and treat obesity in children. The guide is an outcome of FOCUS on a Fitter Future -- an initiative of the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions to address the role of children's medical facilities in combating pediatric obesity while building consensus on performance measurement and quality improvement. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) starting with a vision, (2) building the program, and (3) the sustainability challenge. Topics include developing a needs assessment, collaborative planning, and defining and measuring outcomes. Appendices include examples of weight management treatment programs; a sample business plan; and a payment template and sample authorization form. A glossary and sustainability guide checklist are also included.

Contact: Children's Hospital Association, 600 13th Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 753-5500 Web Site: http://www.childrenshospitals.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Measures, Obesity, Pediatric hospitals, Prevention programs, Program planning, Sustainability, Treatment centers

American Academy of Pediatrics, Task Force on Terrorism. 2005. The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp. (Policy statement)

Annotation: This policy statement provides information about what pediatricians can do to prepare themselves for disasters, including being able to deal with the concerns of parents and families, knowing when to recognize signs of possible exposure to a weapon of terror, understanding first-line response to such attacks, and sufficiently participating in disaster planning to ensure that the unique needs of children are addressed satisfactorily in the overall process. The statement, which includes an abstract, discusses managing family concerns, office-based preparedness, community preparedness, hospital preparedness, pediatricians' liability, and advocacy for children and families in disaster planning. A list of recommendations is included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Communities, Disaster planning, Families, Hospitals, Pediatricians

American Academy of Pediatrics. 1997. Managed care and children with special health care needs. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 131 pp.

Annotation: This book deals with issues affecting services for children with special needs and their families. It is divided into three sections: issue briefs, policy statements, and related articles. Six issues concerning care for children with special needs in a managed care environment are addressed: defining and identifying the population; gate keeping, service authorization, and profiling; capitation and risk adjustment; care coordination strategies; quality care; and approaches to integrated system designs. Policy statements cover the medical home concept, health care financing, and service delivery. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Contact Phone: (800) 433-9016 x7621 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Contact E-mail: kidsdocs@aap.org Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-910761-89-2.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Ethics, Health care delivery, Health care financing, Home care services, Homelessness, Managed care, Medical home, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1996. PIC briefing book: The changing role of hospitals. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This looseleaf notebook provides a collection of materials on the changing role of hospitals in delivering health care. Prepared for a May 1996 meeting of the MCH Partnership for Information and Communication Interorganizational Work Group, the materials provide overviews of children's hospitals, the community care network of the Hospital Research and Education Trust, hospital and community health partnerships, public and urban hospitals, case studies and models, and family and consumer organizations materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Case studies, Community based services, Consumer education, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Hospitals, Models, Pediatric hospitals

Hostler SL. 1994. Family centered care: An approach to implementation. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia, Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center, 570 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the essential components of family-centered care for children with special health care needs and how family-centered care can be implemented, focusing on university hospitals with pediatric residency programs. Section I discusses the nature of teaching hospitals and how policies and procedures can be modified to promote family-centered care. Section II provides examples of family-centered care across the spectrum of tertiary care medical centers. Section III discusses teaching family-centered care in medical education and including it in research design. Section IV shares the five-year experience of family-centered care implementation throughout the Children's Medical Center at the University of Virginia. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Virginia, Kluge Children's Rehabilitation Center, PO Box 800386, Charlottesville, VA 22908, Telephone: 434-924-9130 Web Site: http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/pediatrics/patients/KCRCFAM.cfm Available in libraries.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered care, Medical education, Pediatric hospitals, State programs, Virginia

Schwartz DF, ed. 1992. Children and violence. Columbus, OH: Ross Laboratories, 130 pp. (Report of the Twenty-third Ross Roundtable on Critical Approaches to Common Pediatric Problems)

Annotation: This session of the Ross Roundtable was convened to explore some roles in helping children deal with the violence in their lives. These roles typically could be played by the professionals who care for children's health e.g. pediatricians. Presented were broad themes and issues that cut across the entire experience of children and violence. Subjects of discussion include firearms; and gang, urban, rural, domestic, and media violence. The conference was seen as a first discussion for pediatricians of the impact of violence and possible interventions. The Roundtable hopes to revisit these issues.

Contact: Ross Laboratories, Consumer Relations, 625 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215-1724, Telephone: (800) 227-5767 Secondary Telephone: (614) 624-7485 Contact Phone: (614) 227-3333 Web Site: http://www.ross.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Children, Counseling, Data, Domestic violence, Firearms, Gangs, Health professionals, Homicide, Hospitals, Injuries, Intervention, Media violence, Pediatricians, Prevention, Rural population, Urban population, Violence, War, Witnesses

Andrulis DP, Weslowski VB, Hintz E, Parrott RH, Brady M. 1990. Pediatric AIDS and hospital care in the U.S.: Report on the 1987 U. S. hospital pediatric AIDS survey. Washington, DC: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions and National Public Health and Hospital Institute, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the results of a survey by the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions and the National Public Health and Hospital Institute on the impact of care for officially reportable cases of children with AIDS in hospitals as compared with all persons with AIDS in similar general hospitals.

Contact: National Public Health and Hospital Institute, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 950, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 585-0135 Fax: (202) 585-0101 Web Site: http://www.naph.org/nphhi.cfm?CFID=3225787&CFTOKEN=16150052 Price unknown.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Communicable diseases, Hospitals, Pediatric AIDS

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1989. Health care financing: Unreimbursed charges of selected children's hospitals. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how 13 nonprofit children's hospitals in the United States deal with unreimbursed charges for patient care. It discusses the composition and extent of unreimbursed charges and the effects of these charges, and includes comments from the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HRD-89-76.

Keywords: Health care financing, Pediatric hospitals

Bradshaw KK, ed. 1984. The use of case mix based prospective payment for inpatient pediatric hospital care: Conference proceedings. Rockville, MD: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 125 pp.

Annotation: This conference was convened in response to Congressional efforts to control rising hospital costs through incentives within the payment mechanism. It was held in Alexandria, VA, on June 14-15, 1984. Because pediatric hospital care differs greatly from that of adults, incentives in a payment system for child health care need to make allowances for such specialized care. Topics covered during the conference included diagnosis related groups and the effect of the prospective payment system from the perspective of various health professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Diagnosis related groups, Health care costs, Inpatients, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Prospective payment system

Shore M, ed. 1984. Red is the color of hurting: Planning for children in the hospital. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Mental Health, 94 pp.

Annotation: This book is based on the proceedings of the workshop Mental Health Planning for Pediatric Hospitals, New York, April 1965.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: DHHS (ADM) 84-1336.

Keywords: Child mental health, Hospitalization, Pediatric hospitals, Pediatrics, Planning

Bostin MJ. 1978. Study to quantify the uniqueness of children's hospitals: Summary of major findings. Wilmington, DE: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on a study to identify and quantify the operating and capital costs of children's hospitals and identify and quantify the cost differences with general hospitals of similar size. The areas discussed are intensity of care and specialized services, occupancy, nurse staffing, support service staffing, interns and residents, education and research, community service costs, administrative and nonpayroll variable costs, payment and uncompensated care, space allocations, and construction costs.

Keywords: Fees and charges, Medical personnel, Operating costs, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Pediatric nursing, Research

National Research Council, Assembly of Life Sciences, Division of Medical Sciences, Board on Maternal, Child, and Family Health Research, Committee on Implications of Declining Pediatric Hospitalization Rates. 1976. Implications of pediatric hospitalization rates. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the issue of pediatric bed occupancy. It reviews the available data on the subject and assesses the role of planning in improving the distribution of medical resources for children. It contains assessments of data dealing with hospital statistics for the total US population, hospital statistics for children, hospital use rates, pediatric hospitalization data from state and local studies, regional and local health planning studies, and regionalization and consolidation of pediatric care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Data analysis, Evaluation, Health facility planning, Hospitals, Needs assessment, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Regional planning, Resource allocation, Statewide planning, Statistics

Committee on Perinatal Health. 1976. Toward improving the outcome of pregnancy: Recommendations for the regional development of maternal and perinatal health services. White Plains, NY: The National Foundation-March of Dimes, 38 pp.

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.