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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (23 total).

Iowa Department of Public Health, Sudden Infant Death Program. n.d.. Face up to SIDS. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, Sudden Infant Death Program, 3 items.

Annotation: These three brochures contain information on SIDS prevention. The first brochure, for parents, defines SIDS, provides tips on how to reduce the chance that an infant will die from SIDS, and presents facts about SIDS. The second brochure provides similar information but geared toward child care providers, and the third provides similar information but geared toward grandparents.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Passive smoking, Prevention, SIDS. Infant death, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking, Smoking while pregnant

Oklahoma City-County Health Department. n.d.. Keep your baby safe from tobacco smoke. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma City-County Health Department, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents provides information about how to keep infants safe from tobacco smoke. The brochure discusses why tobacco is harmful, the three types of tobacco smoke (smoking, secondhand smoke, and thirdhand smoke), tips to protect infants from the effects of all types of smoke, and the benefits of keeping infants away from smoke.

Contact: Oklahoma City-County Health Department, 921 NorthEast 23rd Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105, Telephone: (406) 427-8651 E-mail: https://www.occhd.org/about/contact-us Web Site: http://www.occhd.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Bronchitis, Consumer education materials, Costs, Infant health, Otitis media Pneumonia, Passive smoking, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Smoking

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2020. Smoking cessation: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 675 pp. (exec. summ. 15 pp.).

Annotation: This Surgeon General’s report examines the effectiveness of various smoking cessation tools and resources; reviews the health effects of smoking and catalogues the improvements to health that can occur when smokers quit; highlights important new data on populations in which the prevalence of smoking is high and quit rates are low; and identifies gaps in the availability and utilization of programs, policies, and resources that can improve cessation rates and help smokers quit.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Health behavior, Passive smoking, Research, Risk taking, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Tobacco use

Le LT, Watson K, Mayer R, Pickett O, Perry DF, Richards J. 2019. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 14.2 smoking in the household evidence review. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, 139 pp. (brief 8 pp.).

Annotation: This evidence review looks at evidence-based and evidence-informed strategies that MCH Block Grant programs can implement to decrease the percentage of children, ages 0 through 17, who live in households where someone smokes. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Web Site: https://www.mchevidence.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Measures, Adolescents, Block grants, Children, Evidence-based practice, Infants, Literature reviews, Model programs, Passive smoking, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Smoking cessation, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Tobacco use

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2016. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #14: Smoking. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 28 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #14: Smoking--percent of women who smoke during pregnancy and percent of children who live in households where someone smokes. It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Children, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Passive smoking, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Smoking, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Tobacco use, Women

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Life course indicator: Exposure to secondhand smoke inside the home. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This resource describes how exposure to secondhand smoke within the home is measured, this indicator's implications for equity, its public health impact, how to leverage or realign resources to impact this measure, its use to predict an individual's health and wellness, and data criteria and quality.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental exposure, Life course, Measures, Passive smoking, Tobacco

Pregnets (Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke). 2012. Smoking cessation for pregnant and postpartum women: A toolkit for health care providers. [no place]: Pregnets (Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke), 22 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for health care providers, educators, and researchers provides essential components to address smoking cessation and reduction among pregnant and postpartum women. It is divided into sections including: information about smoking and its effects on health, the benefits of quitting smoking, current information about smoking cessation interventions, and options on delivering brief interventions or more intensive counseling to help women quit or reduce smoking.

Contact: Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke, Web Site: http://www.pregnets.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Passive smoking, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

Holtby S, Zahnd E, Grant D, Park R. 2011. Children's exposure to secondhand smoke: Nearly 2.5 million affected in California [rev. ed.]. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp. (Health policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief presents findings from the California Health Interview Survey on rates of exposure to secondhand smoke in the home of children under age 12 in California. Topics include public health efforts to reduce smoking rates, regions of in which children are at greatest risk, African-American children's risk, and lower-income children's risk.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, California, Child health, Geographic factors, Income factors, Low income groups, Passive smoking, Prevention, Public health, Public policy, Racial factors, Smoking, State surveys

International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization. 2009. Evaluating the effectiveness of smoke-free policies. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; dist. by WHO Press, 334 pp. (IARC handbook of cancer prevention: Tobacco control, v. 13)

Annotation: The handbook focuses on the enactment of smoke-free legislation and considers the forces associated with the passage of such legislation as well as evidence for the effect of enacted laws. Topics include the health effects of exposure to secondhand smoke; the evolution of smoke-free policies and their impact of businesses, the hospitality sector, and other incidental outcomes; public attitudes toward smoke-free policies; reductions in exposure to secondhand smoke and effects on health owing to restrictions on smoking; the effect of smoking restrictions on smoking behavior; and home smoking restriction and their effects on exposure and behavior. Studies on which this information is based were done in the United States and additional countries throughout the world.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-92-832-3013-7.

Keywords: Attitudes, Behavior, Evidence, Health, International health, Legislation, Passive smoking, Public policy, Smoking

Partnership for America's Economic Success. [2008]. Early childhood health problems and prevention strategies: Costs and benefits. Washington, DC: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 6 pp. (Issue brief no. 3)

Annotation: This report examines the costs of four types of young children's health problems -- exposure to tobacco smoke, unintentional injury, mental health problems, and obesity -- and reviews over 300 studies of a range of interventions to address them. The authors also assesd the benefits to society of addressing these health problems and lay out the costs of not addressing them.

Contact: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 1025 F Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 E-mail: info@partnershipforsuccess.org Web Site: http://www.PartnershipforSuccess.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Early intervention, Mental health, Obesity, Passive smoking, Prevention, Unintentional injuries, Young children

McMillen RC, Klein JD, Tanski S, Winickoff J, Hill AK. [2008]. Secondhand smoke, media campaigns, and children. [Starkville, MS]: Social Climate of Tobacco Control, Mississippi State University Social Science Resource Center, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Social Climate Survey of Tobacco Control, an attempt to contribute to the understanding of tobacco control through the introduction of an institutional-based perspective. The report provides background and information about the survey and discusses results on secondhand smoke and media campaigns. The bulk of the report consists of tables illustrating survey results.

Contact: Social Climate of Tobacco Control, Mississippi State University Social Science Resource Center, 1 Research Park, Suite 103, Starkville, MS 39759, Telephone: (662) 325-7127 Fax: (662) 325-7966 Web Site: http://www.socialclimate.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Media campaigns, Passive smoking, Smoking, Surveys, Tobacco use

Trust for America's Health. 2008. A healthier America: 10 top priorities for prevention. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 26 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report discusses 10 priorities for improving Americans' health, including promoting disease prevention, combating obesity, preventing tobacco use and exposure, preventing and controlling infectious diseases, preparing for emergencies and bioterrorism attacks, recognizing the relationship between health and economic competitiveness, safeguarding the food supply, planning for seniors' changing health care needs, improving the health of low-income and minority communities, and reducing environmental threats. For each topic, the report discusses why it is a threat to the nation's health and what can be done about it.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communicable disease control, Disease prevention, Emergencies, Environmental exposure, Food supply, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Obesity, Older adults, Passive smoking, Smoking, Tobacco use

CItyMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2008. Prevention of tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure before, during, and after pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials ,

Annotation: This site provides access to a June 19, 2008 webcast that highlights national, state, and local initiatives that address tobacco use and exposure and the health of MCH populations. Systems level approaches to smoking cessation among pregnant and parenting women, as well as the connection between environmental tobacco smoke and infant health were discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Environmental exposure, Infant health, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Passive smoking, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives, Tobacco use

North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, First Step and North Carolina Public Health. 2008. Oh baby!: We want to keep you safe from secondhand smoke—Take the first step for your baby. Raliegh, NC: North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, First Step, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents provides information about how to protect infants from secondhand smoke. The brochure explains why secondhand and thirdhand smoke are harmful and provides tips for avoiding secondhand smoke during pregnacy and after the infant is born. Action plans for avoiding secondhand smoke are provided, and resources for help with quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke are included.

Contact: North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, 1300 St. Mary's Street, Suite 204, Raleigh, NC 27605, Telephone: (919) 828-1819 Fax: (919) 828-1446 E-mail: Janice@nchealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.NCHealthyStart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant health, Passive smoking, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2007. Preventing smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke before, during, and after pregnancy. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke before, during, and after pregnancy. The fact sheet offers facts about the consequences of smoking before and during pregnancy, the prevalence of smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy,and the risks from exposure to secondhand smoke. Recommended strategies and policies are provided.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Passive smoking, Public policy, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2006. The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 709 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the adverse health effects of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke in adults, children, and infants. Contents include the toxicology of secondhand smoke, assessment and prevalence of exposure, reproductive and developmental effects from exposure to secondhand smoke, respiratory effects in children, cancer among adults, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory effects in adults, control of secondhand smoke exposure, and a vision for the future.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html $49.00; also available from the website. Document Number: GPO # 017-024-01685-3.

Keywords: Adults, Adverse effects, Child development, Child health, Children, Passive smoking, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

First Candle and National SIDS and Infant Death Program Support Center. 2006. Safe sleep for my grandbaby. Baltimore, MD: First Candle and National SIDS and Infant Death Program Support Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure, which is geared to grandparents who care for their grandchildren, provides guidelines on keeping infants safe while they are sleeping. It covers the best sleep position to prevent SIDS, spitting up while sleeping, pacifier use, co-sleeping vs. sleeping in a crib, smoking, and infant health.

Contact: CJ First Candle, 49 Locust Avenue, Suite 104, New Canaan, CT 06840, Telephone: (800) 221-7437 E-mail: alison@cjfirstcandle.org Web Site: http://cjfirstcandle.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Grandparents, Infant death, Infant health, Passive smoking, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep position, Smoking

American Lung Association. 2004. Trends in tobacco use. New York, NY: American Lung Association, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report primarily comprises tables and figures that present information from national surveys and studies on morbidity and mortality due to tobacco use in the United States. The report focuses primarily on cigarettes, but statistical information on other tobacco products is also included, and environmental tobacco smoke is discussed. The report begins with text discussing the following topics: mortality, consumption, prevalence of cigarette use among adults, prevalence of other tobacco products among adults, marijuana, prevalence of cigarette use among adolescents, smoking during pregnancy, prevalence of smoking cessation among adults, prevalence of smoking cessation among adolescents, tobacco advertising and promotion, state laws on smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and international cigarette smoking prevalence. Footnotes are included. The text is followed by tables and figures.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adults, Advertising, Marijuana, Morbidity, Mortality, Passive smoking, Smokeless tobacco, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State legislation, Statistical data, Tobacco use, Trends

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Division for Learning Support: Equity and Advocacy. 2003. Clear the air: A secondhand smoke toolkit. [Madison, WI]: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 61 pp. (Bulletin no. 04045)

Annotation: This toolkit, targeted to middle school and high school students, includes materials that promote knowledge and skills to advocate for a healthy smoke-free environment. The toolkit is divided into nine main areas: basic facts/information, youth activities, youth advocacy, research/data, curriculum and other instructional materials, policy, tobacco control resource center and lending library for Wisconsin, fact sheets, and Web sites. Topics include the health risks of secondhand smoke; prevention, intervention, and cessation of tobacco use by youth; and school-based health, safety, and youth development programs and initiatives. Materials provided include survey forms, discussion topics, activity outlines, play scripts, and other resources for statistical and research articles. The toolkit includes color photographs and illustrations. A DVD of the publication is available.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 125 South Webster Street, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 266-8960 Secondary Telephone: (800) 441-4563 Web Site: http://dpi.state.wi.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, Curricula, Data, Environmental exposure, High school students, Internet, Middle school students, Passive smoking, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research, Smoking, Tobacco use, Wisconsin

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2001. Women and smoking: A report of the Surgeon General. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Washington, DC: for sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office , 675 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about smoking-related diseases among women, the toll of smoking on women's health, efforts to prevent initiation of smoking by girls, and the promotion of cessation among all female smokers. The report covers four major topics: (1) patterns of tobacco use among women and girls; (2) health consequences of tobacco use among women; (3) factors influencing tobacco use among women; and (4) efforts to reduce tobacco use among women. The final section discusses future visions for reducing smoking through increased awareness of women's specific health risks, anti-tobacco advocacy, and global issues. Each section concludes with references and a list of abbreviations, tables and figures, and an index conclude the report. Statistical data are provided in table, chart, and graph formats throughout the report.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Health behavior, Passive smoking, Research, Risk taking, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Tobacco use, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.