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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (95 total).

Websters International. n.d.. The Bowdoin Method of parenting education. Brentwood, TN: Websters International, 14 pp., 1 videotape.

Annotation: This packet includes a brochure and informational videotape describing the Bowdoin Method of Parent Education, an education program for high-risk children. The Bowdoin Method contains three separate curricula that teach parents of children from birth through age 13 the attitudes and skills they need to prepare their children for school and life. The materials are geared toward parents with low literacy levels. Descriptions of packages of materials available for purchase, as well as order forms, are included. The packages include parenting books, games, teachers' manuals, parent prizes, posters, pre- and posttest, and videotapes. The materials are available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Audiovisual materials, Children, High risk children, Infants, Life skills, Low literacy materials, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Parents, School readiness, Spanish language materials

Wilson-Simmons R, Jiang Y, Aratani Y. 2017. Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors that promote or hinder children's healthy development, drawing on recent studies to illustrate the importance of parent resiliency in the development of social-emotional competence among children from families with low incomes. The report concludes with program and policy recommendations that have proven effective in promoting the development of protective factors, reducing vulnerabilities, and cultivating resiliency among parents with low incomes and, consequently, their children.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Competence, Coping, Emotional development, Low income groups, Mental health, Parenting skills, Parents, Policy development, Program development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Vulnerability

MacKay JM, Steel A, Dykstra H, Wheeler T, Samuel E, Green A. 2016. Keeping kids safe in and around water: Exploring misconceptions that lead to drowning . Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report examines current patterns, circumstances, beliefs, and behaviors leading to childhood drowning. Topics include drownings in and around the home, pool drownings, and natural water drownings; preventing drowning in childhood through supervision, swim lessons and water survival skills, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation; pool safety tips for parents; and water recreation public policy. A fact sheet about children and the danger of drowning with information about the problem, parents' misconceptions, water survival skills, and water safety tips is included. Detailed profiles for drownings in and around the home, in pools, and in natural water are availale in the accompanying report, Dangerous Waters: Profiles of Fatal Childhood Drownings in the U.S. 2005–2014.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Child safety, Children, Competence, Drowning, Injury prevention, Life skills, Parenting, Policy development, Public policy, Risk taking, Statistical data, Water safety

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014-. Essentials for parenting toddlers and preschoolers. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help parents handle common challenges and build a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with their child. Topics include communicating, creating structure and rules, giving directions, using discipline and consequences, and using time-out. Videos, activities for practicing positive parenting skills, and other resources are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child rearing, Communication skills, Discipline, Multimedia, Parenting education, Parenting skills, Parents

Sacks V, Anderson Moore K, Shaw A, Cooper PM. 2014. The family environment and adolescent well-being. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights several key areas of interaction between the family environment and adolescent well-being, using national data sources. Topics include parent and adolescent closeness and communication, parental relationships, parental monitoring, eating meals together, and parental healthy behaviors. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Communication skills, Families, Health behavior, Parent child relations, Parenting

American Academy of Pediatrics, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. 2013. Trauma guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; [Columbus, OH]: Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, 4 items.

Annotation: These materials for pediatricians provide information on how to support adoptive and foster families who have experienced trauma. The materials include a guide focused on how to help families cope with trauma, a tip sheet about codes to use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health and developmental concerns, a discharge form and referral summary, and a guide for families about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Parenting skills, Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Developmental problems, Families, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Pediatricians, Referrals, Resource materials, Trauma

Forkey H, Garner A, Nalven L, Schilling S, Stirling J. 2013. Helping foster and adoptive families cope with trauma. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 items.

Annotation: This guide provides information to help pediatricians support adoptive and foster families who are coping with trauma. The guide helps pediatricians identify traumatized children, educate families, and empower families; provides coding tips that pediatricians may use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health or developmental concerns; provides a discharge form to give to families; and includes a guide for parents about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Child development, Children, Coping, Families, Family support services, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Parenting skills, Screening, Trauma

Sandstrom H, Huerta S. 2013. The negative effects of instability on child development: A research synthesis. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 57 pp. (Low-income working families, discussion paper 3)

Annotation: This paper, which is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers and practitioners concerned with programs and services for children and families, explores the literature on the effects of instability on children's developmental outcomes and academic achievement. The authors review and synthesize research evidence on five identified domains of instability: family income, parental employment, family structure, housing, and school and child care. Also discussed are key pathways through which instability may affect development, including the role of parenting, parental mental health, and the home environment.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child care, Child development, Children, Employment, Families, Income factors, Life course, Mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Programs, Public policy, Research, Schools, Services

Martinez M, Rider F, Cayce N, Forsell S, Poirier J, Hunt S, Crawford G, Sawyer J. 2013. A guide for father involvement in systems of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about the importance of fathers in the lives of their children and identifies potential consequences of non-involvement. The guide also offers strategies for systems and families to help fathers become more involved. Topics include statistics about the presence or absence of fathers in their children's lives, why children need fathers to be actively involved, ways for systems of care to best support fathers' involvement in individual- and family-service plans, how systems of care can involve fathers in all dimensions of development, different cultural perspectives on fatherhood, the role of young fathers, grandfather involvement, and the role of fathers in the child welfare system.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Child development, Child welfare agencies, Cultural factors, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Grandparents, Parenting skills, Service delivery systems

Spielberger J, Winje C, Gitlow E. 2013. Evaluation of the Capable Kids and Families program: Year 2 findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report provides findings from an 18-month evaluation to examine parent outcomes for families involved with the Community Partnership's Capable Kids and Families (CKF) program and for a comparison group of non CKF families who received services from other providers. CKF supports family functioning and fosters positive developmental outcomes for families raising children with disabilities or developmental delays from birth to age 6. The report discusses the following six broad domains: (1) understanding their child's strengths and needs, (2) helping their child learn and develop, (3) learning to advocate for their child, (4) support systems, (5) access to resources, and (6) positive interactions with their child. The report also provides information about the service experiences of CKF families and indicates other areas in which the CKF program could affect family well-being that could be explored in future research.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family support services, Infants with developmental disabilities, Infants with special health care needs, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Program evaluation, Programs, Research, Service delivery systems

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Leaving your child home alone. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about when it is appropriate to leave a child home alone. Topics include what to consider before leaving a child home alone (including age and maturity, legal guidelines, circumstances, and safety skills); tips for parents (including have a trial period, role play, establish rules, discuss emergencies, check in, talk about it, and don't overdo it); and resources, including state-specific links.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Age factors, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Emergencies, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Safety

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Addressing challenging behavior in children. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar, originally broadcast June 5, 2012, shares effective strategies that both home visiting professionals and parents can use to prevent and respond to disruptive or challenging behavior from their children and promote healthier families.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Behavior development, Behavior modification, Children, Family relations, Home visiting, Parenting skills

Chrisler A, Moore KA. 2012. What works for disadvantaged and adolescent parent programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social programs and interventions for children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about programs that work and do not work to improve outcomes for adolescent parents with low incomes and their children. The fact sheet reviews 20 parenting programs that are geared toward enhancing parents' development, educating them about effective parenting methods, or both. The fact sheet introduces the issue and reports findings for programs in six outcome areas: child outcomes: health; child outcomes: behaviors and development; parent outcomes: reproductive health; parent outcomes: mental health and behaviors; parent outcomes: education, employment, and income; and parenting outcomes. Promising approaches and future research needs are also discussed.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behaviors, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child development Parent support programs, Child health, Education, Employment, Family income, High risk groups, Low income groups, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Reproductive health, Research

Murphey D. 2012. The Child Trends DataBank: A resource for indicators of child well-being . Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a webinar presented by Child Trends on July 12, 2012, that focused on the Child Trends DataBank, which is a resource for indicators of child well-being. The report discusses Child Trends and offers information about the DataBank, ways to use it, and information it includes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child development, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Early childhood development, Education, Families, Fatherhood, Marriage, Mental health, Parenting skills, Poverty, Program, Programs, Public policy, Resource materials, Statistical data, Trends

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. 2012. Never shake a baby (rev. ed.). [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents provides information about why it is important to never shake a baby. The brochure explains what shaken baby syndrome is and its consequences and provides tips on what to do if an infant's crying is upsetting, how to try to stop an infant's crying, and what to do if someone suspects an infant has been shaken. The brochure is written in simple language and is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Consumer education materials, Crying, Infant development, Infant health, Mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2012. The science of neglect: The persistent absence of responsive care disrupts the developing brain. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 17 pp. (Working paper no. 12)

Annotation: This working paper discusses the effect of the absence of responsive care on the developing brain. The report explains the importance of responsive relationships to child well-being and how responsiveness and the lack thereof affect children's brains and their development. The problem of defining neglect is discussed, and four types of unresponsive care are presented (occasional inattention, chronic understimulation, severe neglect in a family context, and severe neglect in an institutional setting). Common misconceptions and the science-policy gap are discussed, along with implications for policy and promising intervention models.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child development, Child neglect, Cognitive development, Early childhood developing, Families, Infant development, Intervention, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Public policy, Relationships, Research

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Legacy for Children [Program web site]. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,

Annotation: This website provides information about Legacy for Children, an evidence-based program whose aim is to improve child outcomes by promoting positive parenting among mothers of infants and young children with low incomes. Information is provided on the program's philosophy, how the program works, and the intervention. More information about program study sites is offered, and links to related pages are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Family support, Family support programs, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Programs, Young children

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. [2011]. SCBIBS (Black infants better survival). (Columbia, SC): South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control,

Annotation: This website, which is geared toward black parents, provides information to help improve the health and well being of black children in South Carolina and their families. The site is divided into the following categories: black women, caring for infants, facts for fathers, health professionals, and dispelling myths. In each category, links are provided to information about topics that can help improve health, reduce risk for morbidity and mortality, and answer common questions.

Contact: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 898-3432 Fax: (803) 898-3323 E-mail: info@dhec.sc.gov Web Site: http://www.scdhec.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child health, Consumer education materials, Families, Fathers, Health, Health status disparities, Infant development, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Nutrition, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Risk factors, South Carolina, Women's health

Zero To Three. [2011]. Little kids, big questions: A parenting podcast series from Zero to Three. Washington, DC: Zero to Three,

Annotation: This podcast series, which is geared toward parents, addresses common issues facing parents of infants and young children, such as helping an infant learn to sleep through the night, dealing with a picky eater, and learning to set limits on a child's behavior. Each podcast features an interview with an expert that focuses on how to apply early childhood development research to daily interactions with infants and young children. The podcasts and transcripts are available in English and Spanish. Resource lists are provided. Continuing education credits are available.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Research, Spanish language materials, Young children

University of California, Davis, Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. 2011. Autism Distance Education Parent Training (ADEPT) Interactive Training: Module I--Strategies for teaching functional skills. [Sacramento, CA]: University of California, Davis MIND Institute,

Annotation: This online learning module provides tools and training to help parents teach their child with autism or a related neurodevelopmental disorder functional skills using Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) techniques. The learning module includes ten interactive lessons; forms and checklists; notes on accessibility; and a glossary of terms.

Contact: University of California, Davis, MIND Institute, 2825 50th Street, Sacramento, CA 95817, Telephone: (916) 703-0280 E-mail: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/contactus/ Web Site: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Life skills, Parent education, Parenting

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.