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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (125 total).

Boston Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Outline of BHSI's pilot nurturing program presently funded through the Carnegie Foundation known as Connect the DOTS. Boston, MA: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 33 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes a pilot family nurturing program, in which parents and children attend a series of classes together. In outline form, the manual explains how the pilot program works and how it is implemented, the philosophy and constructs behind the program, the timeline and budget for the program, and an evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Second Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 534-5395 Secondary Telephone: (617) 534-9799 Contact Phone: (617) 534-7828 Fax: (617) 534-5358 E-mail: healthystart@bphc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Boston Healthy Start, Community based services, Community programs, Facilitating services, Family relations, Family support services, Outreach, Parent education programs, Training materials

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Resource parents' home visiting guide. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 22 pp.

Annotation: This reference document is supplementary to the formal class training a resource mother receives in preparation for the job. It is intended as an organizer and a reminder of information to be covered for each monthly home visit. Each monthly section contains the following: a list of goals for the visit; materials needed; a sample dialogue; step-by-step guide; and follow-up steps. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (202) 562-3046 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Paraprofessional, Parent support services, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Reference materials, Resource mothers

Seattle Children's Hospital, Washington State Department of Health, Within Reach. 2017. Starting point guide: Resources for parents of children with special health care needs. Seattle, WA: Seattle Children's Center for Children with Special Needs, 31 pp.

Annotation: This directory provides an overview of resources for families who have children with health conditions or special health care needs in Washington. Topics include tips from parents, legal help, child care and respite care, child growth and development, community health, oral health, family support, financial information, health insurance information, hearing and vision services, information and referral, medical supplies and equipment, mental health, nutrition, recreation programs, school, and transportation. A form for use in case of an emergency is included

Contact: Seattle Children's Center for Children with Special Needs, P.O. Box 5371, M2-16, Seattle, WA 98105, Telephone: (206) 987-3736 Fax: (206) 884-5741 E-mail: cshcn@seattlechildrens.org Web Site: http://www.cshcn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child care, Child health services, Children, Community based services, Directories, Families, Family support services, Forms, Infants, Information services, Parents, Referrals, Special health care needs, State programs, Washington

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children. 2016. Parenting matters: Supporting parents of children ages 0–8. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 400 pp., brief (4 pp.)

Annotation: This report reviews research on parenting practices and identifies effective practices. The report also recommends ways agencies and others can support interventions that help more parents learn about effective parenting practices. A brief and webinar are also available.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Home visiting, Parenting support services, Prevention programs, Research

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Ryan C. 2014. A practitioner's resource guide: Helping families to support their LGBT children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 15 pp.

Park M, McHugh M. 2014. Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies the unique needs of immigrant parents across the range of expectations for parent skill, engagement, and leadership sought by early childhood education and care programs, as well as strategies for addressing these needs. Contents include selected demographics of children of immigrants and their parents, factors jeopardizing meaningful engagement, the importance of parent engagement specific to children of immigrants, federal programming, family literacy and dual-generation strategies, and adult education. Research findings and recommendations are also presented.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult education, Child care, Early childhood education, Federal programs, Immigrants, Intergenerational programs, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Literacy education, Low literacy, Parent professional relations, Parent support services, Parents, Research, Young children

Smith S, Ekono M, Robbins T. 2014. State policies through a two-generation lens: Strengthening the collective impact of policies that affect the life course of young children and their parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document focuses on state policies that have a collective impact on families and young children. The document describes the strength of collective policy support for children and their parents in states and how states can assess policies that collectively influence the strength of two-generation supports for families with young children. Topics include early care and education, health and nutrition, and parenting and family economic supports. Recommendations are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood education, Families, Family support services, Health policy, Nutrition policy, Parents, Policy analysis, Public policy, Young children

Moodie S, Ramos M. 2014. Culture counts: Engaging black and Latino parents of young children in family support programs. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of family support programs and identifies the features and strategies that may be most effective for reaching and engaging black and Latino families, with the ultimate goal of supporting young children's development. Contents include a synthesis of available research on parent engagement and potential barriers to their engagement in family support services and programs. Recommendations for designing, adapting, and evaluating culturally-relevant family support programs and services are also included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development services, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Families, Family support programs, Parent participation, Parents, Research, Young children

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education. 2014. Policy statement on expulsion and suspension policies in early childhood settings. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education, 17 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement supports families, early childhood programs, and states by providing recommendations from the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Education for preventing and severely limiting expulsion and suspension practices in early childhood settings. Contents include an overview, recommendations for early childhood programs and state action. The appendices include information and resources to implement early childhood mental health consultation and positive behavior intervention and support. Resources for parents and families; programs, schools, and staff; and states are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral health, Consultation, Discipline, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Intervention, Mental health, Parent support services, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Young children

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Welfare Information Gateway, FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, and Center for the Study of Social Policy—Strengthening Families. 2013. 2013 resource guide: Preventing child maltreatment and promoting well-being—A network for action. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 74 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide offers support to community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being, as well as others such as policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, health-care providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy. Contents include: (1) laying the groundwork for understanding child well-being, (2) working with families and six protective factors, (3) engaging the community, (4) protecting children, (5) tip sheets for parents and caregivers, and (6) resources. The tip sheets section includes some items in English and Spanish.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Community based services, Family support services, Maltreated children, Parent education, Prevention, Spanish language materials

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2013. It's only natural: Mother's love, mother's milk. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health,

Annotation: This website offers information to help African-American new mothers and their families understand the benefits of breastfeeding, make breastfeeding work, and get the support they need to breastfeed their infants.Topics include planning ahead, breastfeeding myths, overcoming challenges, finding support, and fitting breastfeeding into women's lives. One woman's breastfeeding story is also presented, and links to related information are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Consumer education materials, Families, Infant health, Mothers, Parent support services, Public awareness campaigns, Women's health

Forkey H, Garner A, Nalven L, Schilling S, Stirling J. 2013. Helping foster and adoptive families cope with trauma. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 items.

Annotation: This guide provides information to help pediatricians support adoptive and foster families who are coping with trauma. The guide helps pediatricians identify traumatized children, educate families, and empower families; provides coding tips that pediatricians may use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health or developmental concerns; provides a discharge form to give to families; and includes a guide for parents about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Child development, Children, Coping, Families, Family support services, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Parenting skills, Screening, Trauma

Nelson J, Yadrich D. 2013. Family caregivers of children with special health care needs: The need for caregiver support as truly family-centered care. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Leadership Education in Neurodevelpomental and Related Disabilities Program, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information on the importance of family caregiver support to the health and well-being of children and adolescents with special health care needs and their families throughout the life course. Topics include caregiving and the life course, parent perspectives, and recommendations for health professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Minnesota, Leadership Education in Neurodevelpomental and Related Disabilities Program, University of Minnesota, 103 Pattee Hall, 150 Pillsbury Drive, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, Telephone: (612) 624-6830 E-mail: fond0030@umn.edu Web Site: http://lend.umn.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Children with special health care needs, Family centered care, Family support services, Parent professional relations

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and Brookings Institution. 2013. Military children and families. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2 items. (The future of children; v. 23, no. 2, Fall 2013)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores subjects related to children and families of members of the U.S. military. Topics include economic conditions of families, children from birth through age 5, child care and other support programs, resilience among adolescents, how wartime military service affects children and families, how children are affected when a parent is injured or killed in combat, building communities of care, and recommendations for data and measurement. An executive summary and policy brief are also available.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anxiety, Children, Families, Family support services, Military, Parent child relations, Resilience, Socioeconomic factors

Spielberger J, Winje C, Gitlow E. 2013. Evaluation of the Capable Kids and Families program: Year 2 findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report provides findings from an 18-month evaluation to examine parent outcomes for families involved with the Community Partnership's Capable Kids and Families (CKF) program and for a comparison group of non CKF families who received services from other providers. CKF supports family functioning and fosters positive developmental outcomes for families raising children with disabilities or developmental delays from birth to age 6. The report discusses the following six broad domains: (1) understanding their child's strengths and needs, (2) helping their child learn and develop, (3) learning to advocate for their child, (4) support systems, (5) access to resources, and (6) positive interactions with their child. The report also provides information about the service experiences of CKF families and indicates other areas in which the CKF program could affect family well-being that could be explored in future research.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family support services, Infants with developmental disabilities, Infants with special health care needs, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Program evaluation, Programs, Research, Service delivery systems

Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee. 2013. Curriculum for a lactation program. Morrisville, NC: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 32 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum presents competencies and objectives to guide any lactation program, regardless of setting. Topics include communication and counseling; documentation and communication; history taking and assessment; prenatal and perinatal breastfeeding support; extended breastfeeding support; problem-solving skills; newborn/child breastfeeding challenges; maternal breastfeeding challenges' use of techniques and devices; public health; research, legislation, and policy; professional responsibilities and practice; and leadership and teaching. For each topic, information is provided about core competencies, learning objectives, suggested content, and suggested skills and behaviors. [Record in process]

Contact: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 2501 Aerial Center Parkway, Suite 103, Morrisville, NC 27560, Telephone: (919) 459-6106 E-mail: info@leaarc.org Web Site: http://www.leaarc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Breastfeeding support, Lactation, Leadership, Legislation, Parent support services, Public health, Public policy, Research, Standards

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2013. Transitioning newborns from NICU to home: A resource toolkit. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

Annotation: This toolkit includes resources for hospitals to improve safety when newborns transition home from their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) by creating a Health Coach Program, tools for coaches, and information for parents and families of newborns who have spent time in the NICU. Contents include a resource toolkit, family information packets, clinical materials to share with primary care providers, a NICU needs assessment, and a followup telephone survey.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Parent education, Parent support services, Patient discharge

Langford BH, Greenblatt SB. [2012]. Investment matters: Investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults in or transitioning from foster care. Chicago, IL: Youth Transition Funders Group, Foster Care Work Group, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights considerations, challenges, and opportunities for foundations in investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults—both mothers and fathers—currently in or transitioning from foster care. Topics include early sexual behavior, pregnancy, and rates of childbearing and parenthood among young people in foster care, risk factors, and challenging outcomes. Additional challenges such as lack of national data on specific needs and challenges, lack of practice models, need for workforce training, how to best identify and support adolescent fathers, and limited application of developmentally appropriate service delivery and planning with those that remain in foster care through age 21 are discussed. Investment opportunities in research and data collection, pregnancy prevention strategies, state supports for young parents and their children, and extending eligibility and re-entry are outlined.

Contact: Youth Transitions Funders Group, 207 East Ohio Street, #392, Chicago, IL 60611, E-mail: info@ytfg.org Web Site: http://www.ytfg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Family support programs, Foster care, Parent support services, Transition to independent living, Young adults

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.