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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (235 total).

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. n.d.. Helping children cope during deployment. Bethesda, MD: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2 pp. (Courage to care)

Annotation: This fact sheet, which is geared toward parents and family caregivers, contains information to help children cope during a parent's deployment. The fact sheet presents commonly asked questions and their responses. General tips for communicating with children of all ages, as well as advice for communicating with children from age 3 through adolescents according to their ages, are also included.

Contact: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (800) 515-5257 E-mail: webmaster@usuhs.gov Web Site: http://www.usuhs.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Child mental health, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Coping, Families, Military, Parent child relations, Parents

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. n.d.. Advancing the health of the family left behind: Fact sheet for providers. Bethesda, MD: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2 pp. (Courage to care)

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on the anxieties and concerns of families, especially children, of deployed soldiers. The fact sheet defines some of the critical phases and issues of family vulnerability during deployment and provides advice and language that can enhance interactions with the family left behind. Topics covered include the following reference points for health professionals and families: (1) preparing children for departure, (2) communicating with children during deployment, and (3) reuniting. A brief list of resources for parents and health professionals is provided.

Contact: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (800) 515-5257 E-mail: webmaster@usuhs.gov Web Site: http://www.usuhs.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Military, Parent child relations, Parents

Family Voices, IMPACT. n.d.. The Affordable Care Act (ACA): Prevention and health promotion for everybody!. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, IMPACT, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document encourages families to partner with health professionals on getting preventive health services and to take a lead role in promoting health at home and where they live, work, and play. Topics include how information sharing between families and health professionals can promote child health, the Affordable Care Act's preventive health services for children, the Bright Futures initiative, and tips for a healthy lifestyle. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, IMPACT, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.E., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-impact.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Child health, Children, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health promotion, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, Special health care needs

CrossBear S, LeGore S. n.d.. Family involvement in child-serving systems and the need for cross-system collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief reviews what has been accomplished to date in the development of the family voice in all child-serving systems including substance abuse, mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, trauma support, education, and primary care. The review indicates what needs to occur to create true cross-systems collaboration supporting family involvement, so that youth and their families can fully access the service and supports they need to obtain and maintain optimum health.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Families, Family centered care, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Service delivery systems

Pediatrics Supporting Parents Learning Community. 2020. Core practices, strategies, and resources for supporting social emotional development in pediatric care. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 26 pp.

Annotation: This packet provides the best strategies for participating practices so pediatric providers across the country can benefit from their learning from a quality improvement framework with 18 pediatric primary care practices to test and refine strategies to improve their effectiveness in fostering patients’ social and emotional development from birth to age 3. These core practices and strategies serve as a roadmap for the participating pediatric providers and includes additional resources developed as part of this initiative or identified as useful. The document summaries strategies for each core element and lists additional resources. Sample forms are included.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emotional development, Model programs, Parent professional relations, Pediatric care, Pediatrics, Quality improvement, Social development, Young children

Georgia State University School of Public Health. 2016. SafeCare curriculum. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University School of Public Health, 4 items.

Annotation: This resource provides materials for the SafeCare, an evidence-based, parent-training curriculum for parents of infants and children from birth to age 5 who are at-risk for or have been reported for child neglect or physical abuse. Topics include the evidence-base, cost-benefit, cost of implementation of SafeCare; the structure of the parent child/infant interaction, health, home safety, and family engagement skills modules; certification and support including the role of the home visitor, coach, and trainer; and implementation planning and sustainability. Curricula are available for providers (in English and Spanish), coaches, and trainers.

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, 14 Marietta Street, N.W., Suite 100, Atlanta, GA 30303, Web Site: http://healthy.gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Curricula, Early childhood development, Home visiting, Infants, Model programs, Motivation, Parent child relations, Parent education, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Program planning, Safety, Sustainability, Training, Young children

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2015. Partnering with your child's health plan. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides tips for families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) about partnering with their child's health care plan to improve health outcomes. The fact sheet explains how health plans can learn more about CSHCN from families and how family members can become key players in care coordination. Included are checklists to help families assess their health plans' policies regarding children with special needs, ensure appropriate care, provide specialty care referrals, and identify and respond to mental or behavioral health needs. Case management, conflict resolution, parental involvement, and policy development are also addressed. The fact sheet concludes with questions for families and professionals who are interested in becoming a child advocate. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Communication, Health care systems, Health insurance programs, Parent professional relations, Spanish language materials

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Zero to Three. 2014-. The magic of everyday moments: Seeing is believing. Zero To Three, multiple items.

Annotation: This video series for parents and students of child development uses everyday interactions and routines to demonstrate how parents can nurture the key skills and attributes that children need as they grow. The content is presented by infant and child developmental stage (from birth to age 12 months, 12 to 24 months, and 24 to 36 months). Topics include nurturing healthy brain development from birth; temperament; forming a trusting bond; building strong, positive connections and interactions; developing skills through play, routines, and relationships; and foundations in language, literacy, thinking, and social-emotional skills.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Development stages, Early child development, Infants, Learning, Multimedia, Parenting, Parents, Play, Relationships, School readiness, Young children

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2014. Partnering with your child's provider. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) can develop partnerships with their child's doctors and providers to improve health outcomes. It explains how to prepare for an office visit and how to communicate effectively with health providers. Included are resources to help families gather information and make decisions concerning treatment options for their child. The fact sheet also suggests ways to encourage families and providers to become involved in advocacy efforts. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Family centered care, Parent professional relations, Provider participation, Spanish language materials

Agoratus L. 2014. Affordable Care Act (ACA): Why oral health is important for children with special health care needs and how to access it. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 2 pp. (ACA tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet for parents of children with special health care needs provides information about the importance of good oral health care. Topics include finding oral health coverage, resources for families who do not have health insurance, and partnering with oral health professionals.

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Dental care, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Oral health, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Special health care needs

Park M, McHugh M. 2014. Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies the unique needs of immigrant parents across the range of expectations for parent skill, engagement, and leadership sought by early childhood education and care programs, as well as strategies for addressing these needs. Contents include selected demographics of children of immigrants and their parents, factors jeopardizing meaningful engagement, the importance of parent engagement specific to children of immigrants, federal programming, family literacy and dual-generation strategies, and adult education. Research findings and recommendations are also presented.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult education, Child care, Early childhood education, Federal programs, Immigrants, Intergenerational programs, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Literacy education, Low literacy, Parent professional relations, Parent support services, Parents, Research, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. KnowBullying: Put the power to prevent bullying in your hand. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Annotation: This mobile application is designed to help parents start a conversation with their children about bullying. The application describes strategies to prevent bullying and explains how to recognize warning signs that a child is bullying or being bullied. A section for educators is also included. The application is available in English, German, Northern Sami, and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Mobile applications, Non English language materials, Parent child relations, Parents, Spanish language materials, Violence prevention

Hughes D. 2014. A review of the literature pertaining to family-centered care for children with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a review of selected research related to family-centered care (FCC) for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Contents include highlights from studies that examine the following components of FCC: family-provider partnerships, coordinated care, racial/ethnic and linguistic barriers, and culturally competent care. It also examines access, unmet need and satisfaction for CSHCN and outcomes of FCC and medical homes.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Families, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Special health care needs

Sacks V, Anderson Moore K, Shaw A, Cooper PM. 2014. The family environment and adolescent well-being. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights several key areas of interaction between the family environment and adolescent well-being, using national data sources. Topics include parent and adolescent closeness and communication, parental relationships, parental monitoring, eating meals together, and parental healthy behaviors. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Communication skills, Families, Health behavior, Parent child relations, Parenting

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.