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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (24 total).

Nelson R. n.d.. CHSC Parent Partnership Project: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa , 46 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to strengthen family-centered care for Iowa children with special health care needs by expanding parent participation in CHSC services development, by creating a statewide parent consultant network, and by enhancing community opportunities for parents to meet with one another and with professionals in a family-oriented experience. Program plans included an annual statewide issues forum; a regional parent consultant network composed of 2 parents from each of the 13 CHSC service regions; and family enrichment weekends designed to bring together parents and children for discussion, reflection, and recreation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146777.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Parent Networks, Parent-Professional Communication, Parents

Anderson B. n.d.. Collaboration Among Parents and Health Professionals (CAPP) [Final report]. Boston, MA: Federation for Children with Special Needs, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project worked with the Technical Assistance for Parent Programs Project and the U.S. Office of Special Education Resources in order to increase and enhance parent involvement in the health care of children with disabilities and special health needs. The project sought to (1) prepare parents to assume an integral role in the health care of their children with disabilities; (2) promote effective communication and collaboration among health care professionals and parents in order to enhance health services for children; and (3) develop a national support system to ensure that parents have access to essential information and peer support. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152940.

Keywords: 99-457 Financing Intervention, Early Association for the Care of Children's Health (ACCH) Parent Networks, Health Professionals, L, Parent Education Parent Professional Communication Peer Support P, Parents

Johnson C. n.d.. Making It Work for Children with Special Needs: The Family, the Community, the State [Final report]. Morgantown, WV: W. G. Klingberg Center for Child Development, 17 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve the overall system of health care delivery for West Virginia children with special health needs. Specific goals were to: (1) Provide individualized family empowerment training with specific emphasis on skills in case management; (2) strengthen the Handicapped Children's Services system of case management; (3) provide coordinated, comprehensive medical and educational evaluations for children with special health needs; (4) establish a movement recognizing parents as equal partners within the professional team; (5) enhance networking through a parent-provider interdisciplinary, interagency conference; (6) identify a primary medical home for every child with special health needs; (7) emphasize the role of the primary care physician as a member of the community team; (8) assure continuation of the project beyond the funding period; and (9) expand services to all children with special health needs in West Virginia. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121867.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Case Management, Children with Special Health care Needs, Families, Family Professional Collaboration, Interagency Cooperation, Medical Home, PL 99-457, Parent Professional Communication, Parents, Primary Care, Service Coordination

Douglass J. n.d.. Discussing oral health with parents of children who have dental cavities. [Arlington, VA: Head Start Resource Center], 3 pp.

Annotation: This handout for oral health professionals discusses motivational interviewing as a means to communicate with parents about the importance of children visiting the dentist for screening and dental care. It provides questions to encourage discussion about parent's oral health goals for their children, exchanging information about their child's dental health, and how to achieve oral health goals for their child.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Oral health, Parent education, Patient care management, Resources for professionals, Young children

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2015. Partnering with your child's health plan. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides tips for families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) about partnering with their child's health care plan to improve health outcomes. The fact sheet explains how health plans can learn more about CSHCN from families and how family members can become key players in care coordination. Included are checklists to help families assess their health plans' policies regarding children with special needs, ensure appropriate care, provide specialty care referrals, and identify and respond to mental or behavioral health needs. Case management, conflict resolution, parental involvement, and policy development are also addressed. The fact sheet concludes with questions for families and professionals who are interested in becoming a child advocate. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Communication, Health care systems, Health insurance programs, Parent professional relations, Spanish language materials

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2015. Doctors and dentists are parents too and they support community water fluoridation. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These images are designed to assist pediatricians and other supporters of community water fluoridation (CWF) in sharing information with parents. The images focus on the safety and effectiveness of CWF and can be downloaded and posted to a website or social media.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Communication, Consumer education, Fluorides, Multimedia, Oral health, Parents, Resources for professionals, Water

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2014. Partnering with your child's provider. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) can develop partnerships with their child's doctors and providers to improve health outcomes. It explains how to prepare for an office visit and how to communicate effectively with health providers. Included are resources to help families gather information and make decisions concerning treatment options for their child. The fact sheet also suggests ways to encourage families and providers to become involved in advocacy efforts. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Family centered care, Parent professional relations, Provider participation, Spanish language materials

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology. 2014. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in children and adolescents: Factsheets. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, 3 items.

Annotation: These fact sheets provide information about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in children and adolescents. Topics include helping clients reduce symptoms, understanding how CFS affects children and adolescents in school, communicating with schools, and supporting students with CFS and other chronic conditions in the school environment. Each sheet is directed at specific audiences, including health professionals, parents, and education professionals.

Contact: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc-info@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dhcpp/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic fatigue syndrome, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communication, Parents, Resources for professionals, School age children, Schools, Special health care needs

Gruttadaro D, Markey D. 2011. The family experience with primary care physicians and staff. Arlington, VA: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the experiences of parents and caregivers of children and adolescents living with mental illness related to discussing mental health concerns about their child with primary care physicians and staff. Topics include demographics, background information, primary care setting, initiating communication, effective communication and dialogue, and actions steps.

Contact: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203, Telephone: (703) 524-7600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 950-6264 Fax: (703) 524-9094 E-mail: info@nami.org Web Site: http://www.nami.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Communication, Mental disorders, Parent professional relations, Parents, Primary care

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. 2005. Just in time for families: Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI). Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 25 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides an overview of the early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI)process, including screening before ages 1, 3 and 6 months; communication choices for families with infants who have hearing loss; and working with the infant's health care provider. A list of Web sites for more information is included. It is available in English and in Spanish.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Communication, Deafness, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infants, Parent professional relations, Spanish language materials

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. 2005. Just in time for pediatric primary care providers: Early hearlng detection and intervention (EHDI). Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 25 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides an overview of the EHDI process, the timing or care before1, 3, and 6 months of age, communication choices, the primary care provider's role as a medical home,and risk factors for hearing loss. A list of Web sites for further information is included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Deafness, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infants, Parent professional relations

U.S. Surgeon General. 2000. The face of a child: Surgeon General's Workshop and Conference on Children and Oral Health—Proceedings (Draft). Unpublished manuscript,

Annotation: These draft proceedings of the Surgeon General's conference, held on June 12-13, 2000, in Washington, DC, address children's oral health and highlight key policy issues relating to equity and disparities in access to oral health care and in health outcomes. These proceedings include the following: an executive summary; children's oral health, context and background from Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General; and key themes from the Surgeon General's Workshop held in March 2000 in Washington, DC. Additional section topics include: emphasizing health promotion and disease prevention in oral and craniofacial conditions; integrating oral health into overall health professional training and service delivery; eliminating disparities in children's oral health with public-private partnerships and community collaborations; increasing evidence base and science transfer; beyond cosmetics: increasing public awareness of children's oral health with communication strategies; and learning from history, children's oral health and access to care. Also provided in the proceedings are conclusions and recommendations from the workshop and conference; six appendices that contain selected presentations/papers from the conference; and the conference agenda.

Contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (866) 232-4528 E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov Web Site: https://www.nidcr.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Communication, Conference proceedings, Dental care, Oral health, Parents, Professional training, Public private partnerships

Greenspan SI, Weider S, Simons R. 1998. The child with special needs: Encouraging intellectual and emotional growth. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 496 pp.

Annotation: This book guides parents, educators, and others who work with children with developmental disabilities in understanding the nature of the challenges and specific ways of helping children extend their intellectual and emotional potential. In three parts, the book discusses discovering each child's unique strengths, developmental capacities, and challenges; encouraging emotional and intellectual growth; and family, therapy, and school. Topics include biological challenges and strengths; emotions and interactions; communications; feelings and ideas; logical thinking; special-needs syndromes; and marital, family, and school challenges. The appendices outline floor-time strategies; food sensitivities and chemical exposures; and children with relating and communicating disorders. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: Perseus Publishing, 11 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, Telephone: (617) 252-5298 Secondary Telephone: (800) 255-1514 Fax: (800) 324-3791 Web Site: http://www.perseuspublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-201-40726-4.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Communication skills, Emotional development, Families, Mental health, Parent education, Parent professional relations

Malach R. [1997]. Opportunities for Parents and Professionals to Understand Strategies for Cross-Cultural Communication [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 37 pp.

Annotation: The goals of this project were to: (1) identify cultural barriers to communication and collaboration between families and professionals related to sharing and maintaining health histories and personal information; and (2) define and identify effective, culturally competent strategies and materials that families of diverse cultures can use to maintain and share information with professionals. An evaluation consultant assisted in developing and monitoring the evaluation plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Cultural Sensitivity, Family Centered Health Care, Family Professional Collaboration, Parent Professional Communication

Johnson C. [1997]. Building Family-Professional Collaboration in West Virginia [Final report]. Morgantown, WV: Klingberg Center for Child Development, 21 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to enhance family-professional collaboration by integrating the principles and practices of family-centered, community-based, culturally competent, coordinated care into an existing statewide system of community-based Title V clinics that served children with special health needs (CSHN). The project (1) provided training to families and professionals first in a local county and then statewide; (2) created joint training opportunities for families and professionals; and (3) coordinated opportunities for the senior administrative staff in the Title V CSHN and university health care delivery systems to receive feedback from children and families using services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-144727.

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Family Professional Collaboration, Parent Education, Parent Professional Communication, Rural Population, State Staff Development, Training

Nelkin VS, Malach RS. 1996. Achieving healthy outcomes for children and families of diverse cultural backgrounds. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 35 pp.

Annotation: This monograph for health and human service providers summarizes the results of the OPUS project (Opportunities for Parents and Professionals to Understand Strategies for Cross-Cultural Communication), a three-year Special Project of Regional and National Significance which aimed to improve services to children with special health care needs by developing a culturally responsive model to improve family-provider communication and collaboration. Cultural groups involved in the project included African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans. The document presents insights from focus groups held by the project, lists points that service providers should be aware of, and makes recommendations for professionals and families. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Abrazos Family Support Services, P.O. Box 788, Bernalillo, NM 87004, Telephone: (505) 867-3396 Fax: (505) 867-3398 E-mail: info@abrazosnm.org Web Site: http://www.swcr.org/ Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHJ050.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Health services, Minority groups, Parent professional relations

Southwest Communication Resources. 1996. Family perspectives: Cultural/ethnic issues affecting children with special health care needs—Educational fact packets for health and human service providers. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 24 pp., 3 items.

Annotation: This notebook is intended for health care service providers who wanted to know more about the perspectives of families from diverse cultural backgrounds. It provides concise summaries about barriers that inhibit cross-cultural communication and methods for overcoming them. It also contains two additional publications and a products catalog from the publisher. It was compiled as part of the OPUS project (Opportunities for Parents and Professionals to Understand Strategies for Cross-Cultural Communication), a three-year Special Project of Regional and National Significance which aimed to improve services to children with special health care needs by developing a culturally responsive model to improve family-provider communication and collaboration. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Health services, Minority groups, Parent professional relations, Videotapes

RMC Corporation. [1995]. Communicating with parents: Training guides for the Head Start learning community. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 89 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist Head Start staff in meeting their communication goals and enhancing their relationships with the parents they work with. The guide is based on three central ideas about communication in the Head Start program: (1) effective communication is the cornerstone of the parent/staff partnership, (2) whether formal or informal, effective communication is respectful and clear, and (3) to communicate well, one must consciously practice the skills involved and must plan for it, both at the personal and at the program level. The guide is organized into four modules: (1) communication in the Head Start community, (2) speaking and listening effectively, (3) using plain language writing, and (4) planning the communication process. The guide includes a continuing professional development section that lists ideas supervisors can use to help staff apply new skills and extend their learning, as well as a resources section.

Contact: Education Resources Information Center, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20208, Telephone: (202) 219-1385 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.eric.ed.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GPO 2000-515-032/20513.

Keywords: Communication, Head Start, Health promotion, Parents, Resources for professionals, Training materials

Advocates for Youth. 1995. Life planning education: A youth development program. (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 541 pp.

Annotation: This teaching guide helps educators prepare adolescents in grades 7–12 to make decisions about topics that will affect their lives. It covers the skills and information adolescents need to make transitions from school to adulthood. The guide uses exercises and activities that rely on the experiences of the participants to reinforce the lesson. Chapters cover these topics: self perception and self image; personal, family, and community values; communication; relationships; sexuality; community participation; goal setting; decision making; gender roles; parenting; responding to violence; health care; reducing sexual risks, and employment. The guide includes an evaluation form and lists sources of videotapes. An earlier edition of this title was released in 1989 by the Center for Population Options, which was the publisher's name at that time. It is being revised in 2015. It is also available in Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org $44.95 plus 20 percent shipping and handling.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Communication skills, Decision making, Educational materials, Employment, Family planning, HIV, Health, Interpersonal relations, Life skills, Non English language materials, Parenting, Planning, Problem solving, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Self concept, Sex role, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social values, Spanish language materials, Violence prevention

Hoyt D. 1994 (ca.). Strengthening Our Partnership: A Commitment to Parent Leadership in the Design of Iowa's Comprehensive Service System [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa,

Annotation: The overall goal of the Strengthening Our Partnership project was to further develop services for Iowa's children with special health care needs and their families through activities that strengthened the effective leadership of parents in the design of a comprehensive service system. The three primary project objectives were to: (1) Establish statewide coordination among parents and parent programs to facilitate ongoing communication and collaboration; (2) establish a multiagency capacity for parent leadership in the design and delivery of services for children with special health care needs and their families; and (3) strengthen parent-professional teamwork in the development, implementation, and evaluation of family-centered programs and policies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Family Professional Collaboration, Leadership Training, Parent Networks, Parent Professional Communication, Parents, Service Coordination

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.