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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Zero to Three. 2014-. The magic of everyday moments: Seeing is believing. Zero To Three, Multiple items.

Annotation: This video series for parents and students of child development uses everyday interactions and routines to demonstrate how parents can nurture the key skills and attributes that children need as they grow. The content is presented by infant and child developmental stage (from birth to age 12 months, 12 to 24 months, and 24 to 36 months). Topics include nurturing healthy brain development from birth; temperament; forming a trusting bond; building strong, positive connections and interactions; developing skills through play, routines, and relationships; and foundations in language, literacy, thinking, and social-emotional skills.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Development stages, Early child development, Infants, Learning, Multimedia, Parenting, Parents, Play, Relationships, School readiness, Young children

Boyd LW. 2013. Theraeputic foster care: Exceptional care for complex, trauma-impacted youth in foster care. Washington, DC: First Focus, State Policy and Advocacy Reform Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about best practices in therapeutic or treatment foster care (TFC), a clinical intervention for youth from birth to age 18 who have severe mental, emotional, or behavioral health needs. Topics include essential partners; building relationships among provider agencies and child advocates; example practices in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska; efforts to expand the focus beyond safety and permanency to well-being for youth in therapeutic foster care; and public policy challenges.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Behavioral medicine, Children with special health care needs, Foster care, Foster parents, Health services delivery, Intervention, Medically fragile children, Mental health, Policy development, Psychological needs, Reimbursement, Relationships, Therapeutics, Training, Trauma care, Youth

Olson S; Institute of Medicine, Committee on From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Anniversary Workshop and National Research Council. 2012. From neurons to neighborhoods: An update—Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 55 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a summary of a workshop held by the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council on October 27–28, 2010, in Washington DC, to review and commemorate a decade of advances related to the mission of the report, From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, released on October 3, 2000. It discusses research and policy issues.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available at no charge from the website after registration; $33 plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-20978-6.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Learning, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Parent child relations, Public policy, Relationships, Research, Stress, Young children

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2012. The science of neglect: The persistent absence of responsive care disrupts the developing brain. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 17 pp. (Working paper no. 12)

Annotation: This working paper discusses the effect of the absence of responsive care on the developing brain. The report explains the importance of responsive relationships to child well-being and how responsiveness and the lack thereof affect children's brains and their development. The problem of defining neglect is discussed, and four types of unresponsive care are presented (occasional inattention, chronic understimulation, severe neglect in a family context, and severe neglect in an institutional setting). Common misconceptions and the science-policy gap are discussed, along with implications for policy and promising intervention models.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child development, Child neglect, Cognitive development, Early childhood developing, Families, Infant development, Intervention, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Public policy, Relationships, Research

Benson PL, Scales PC, Leffert N, Roehlkepartain EC. 2011. A fragile foundation: The state of developmental assets among American youth (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 153 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of adolescents in terms of developmental assets. The findings are based on data from a survey—"Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors"—that measures 40 developmental assets, or positive factors. The document provides information about the following: the background assets and the young people surveyed; young people's experiences of developmental assets; the deficits and patterns of high risk behavior that compromise young people's healthy development; the power of assets in relation to risky behaviors; an overall goal for well-being; and creative tensions that address challenges and opportunities of the report. Each chapter includes text, figures, and tables of data by grade and gender. Appendices offer additional details of other demographic differences.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 0352.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Cultural factors, Decision making, Education, Families, High risk adolescents, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction, Statistics

Berger LM, McLanahan SS. 2011. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: How do characteristics and relationships matter?. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 50 pp. (Fragile Families working paper: WP11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines the role of individual and family characteristics and relationships, with regard to differences in well-being for children living with their biological mother and either their biological father or a social father. It investigates cognitive skills and externalizing behavior problems for 5-year-olds; the importance of mother, father, and child characteristics; mother-father relationships and co-parenting; mother-child relationships; and father-child relationships.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child development, Cognitive development, Families, Father child relations, Mother child relations, Parenting, Relationships, Parent child relations, Young children

Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2011. A closer look at the Early Head Start Home-Based Program option. Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 1 DVD-ROM.

Annotation: This webcast focuses on Early Head Start's home-based program option. The webcast explains why some families enrolled in Head Start choose the home-based option and discusses what the program offers. The webcast also discusses how the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has allocated additional funds to states for home visiting programs for children and families living in at-risk communities.

Contact: Early Head Start National Resource Center, Office of Head Start, Eighth Floor Portals Building, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (844) 261-3752 E-mail: ecdtl@ecetta.info Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Early Head Start, Families, Federal programs, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Parenting skills, Pregnant women, Relationships, Rural populations, Young children

Growing Great Kids. [2009]. Growing Great Kids for preschoolers: Curriculum and training seminars. Altadena, CA: Growing Great Kids,

Annotation: This Web site describes an interactive curriculum geared toward optimizing developmental outcomes for preschool children (ages 3-5). The curriculum provides parents, home visitors, and preschool teachers with the knowledge and skills needed to support children in forming strong self-esteem, critical and creative thinking capabilities, cooperative peer relationships, age-appropriate impulse control, habits foundational to healthy lifestyles, and social and academic building blocks for school success. The curriculum can be used with groups of children in center- or home-based programs, with parents and children during home visits, in parent-education groups, and for training preschool teachers and child care providers. The curriculum includes a manual with 24 parent- and teacher-education modules, a manual with child development activities for 3-year-olds, and a manual with child-development activities for 4- and 5-year-olds. Curriculum training is also provided.

Contact: Great Kids Inc., 100 North 72 Avenue, Suite 200 , Wausau, WI 54401 , Telephone: 800-906-5581 Secondary Telephone: 626-345-0684 E-mail: jeang@greatkidsinc.net Web Site: http://www.greatkidsinc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Curricula, Early childhood development, Home visiting, Parenting skills, Relationships, School readiness, Training

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2009. Court-involved children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast, which was conducted on April 15, 2009, focuses on the importance of attachment to a child's well-being and mental health. The speaker discusses toxic stress and trauma and understanding the impact on young children's development and mental health. The webcast can be viewed in various formats, including video + slides + captioning, presentation slides, transcript (html or pdf), or audio only. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Multimedia, Attachment behavior, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Childhood development, Early childhood development, Mental health, Parent child relations, Relationships, Stress

Klass CS. 2008. The home visitor's guidebook: Promoting optimal parent and child development. (3rd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 412 pp.

Annotation: This book provides techniques home visitors can use to improve their relationships with the parents and children with whom they work; it develops a multidisciplinary approach to the profession. The book first reviews the historical development of the profession and examines the home visitor's interpersonal skills and attitudes and their professional development. The book then covers topics regularly encountered during home visits: developing a sense of self; guidance and discipline; communications and language; play, learning, and development; everyday rituals and celebrations; children's illnesses; siblings; and the psychologically vulnerable family. The book concludes with a chapter examining issues related to personal history and professional competence; as well as resources, endnotes, references, and an index.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com $34.00; no shipping and handling charge if prepaid. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-55766-903-2.

Keywords: Child development, Family centered services, Home visiting, Interdisciplinary approach, Parent child relationships, Parenting

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. The consequences of unplanned pregngancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet lists some of the consequences of unplanned pregnancy related to child health and development; parents and relationships; preconception care, prenatal care, and infant health; child health and development and family environment; and mothers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Child development, Child health, Families, Infant health, Mental health, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Postpartum depression, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Relationships, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. Science says: Unplanned pregnancy and family turmoil. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 34)

Annotation: This research brief explores the link between unplanned births and relationship turmoil and conflict within the family. The brief also provides background information about unplanned pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Parent child relations, Prenatal care, Relationships, Single parents, Stress, Unplanned pregnancy

Johnston K, Brinamen C. 2006. Mental health consultation in child care: Transforming relationships with directors, staff, and families. Washington, DC: Zero to Three Press, 295 pp.

Annotation: This book for mental health professionals, early childhood educators and trainers, and policymakers reviews current theory and offers practical suggestions for improving relationships to help identify and remove obstacles to quality child mental health care and to make positive changes in the child care environment. The first chapter describes how the relationship between the mental health care provider and child care provider is established and how the range of activities are part of mental health consultation in child care. Part one describes several relationships that characterize program consultation: the consultant's relationships with the child care program's director and staff, the relationships among staff members, and the staff's relationship with parents. Part two examines case consultation, exploring the integration of information from observation and from the adults in the child's life as a way to understand the meaning of a child's behavior. It also examines the process of translating this understanding into responsive action, reducing the child's distress.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Case studies, Child behavior, Child care, Child care services, Child care workers, Child mental health, Consultation, Parent child relations, Parent professional relations, Relationships

Osborne C, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J . 2005. Young children's behavioral problems in married and cohabitating families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 4 pp. (Fragile families research brief; no. 33)

Annotation: This research brief examines the behavior of children born to married and cohabiting parents in stable unions to determine whether marital status at birth is associated with behavior problems at age 3. If differences in child behavior exist between stably married and cohabiting families, the authors examine what proportion of problems is due to differences in parents' demographic characteristics, economic resources, relationship quality, health, and health behaviors. The authors also compare children born to cohabiting parents who marry after the child's birth with children born to cohabiting parents who remain in cohabiting relationships. The brief presents data and methods, results, and a conclusion and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Demography, Economic factors, Families, Health, Health behavior, Marriage, Parents, Relationships, Single parents, Young children

Carlson M, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2005. Unmarried but not absent: Fathers' involvement with children after a nonmarital birth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-07-FF)

Annotation: This paper investigates the level and predictors of fathers' involvement with children approximately 3 years after a nonmarital birth. The authors examine the frequency of fathers' spending time with their child, their engagement in various father-child activities, and their help with household tasks. The authors also examine differences in fathers' involvement by parents' relationship status at the child's birth. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses previous research, data and methods, bivariate results, and regression results. A discussion is included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. References are included.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Parents, Relationships, Single fathers, Single mothers, Single parents

Scales PC, Leffert N. 2004. Developmental assets: A synthesis of the scientific research on adolescent development (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 279 pp.

Annotation: This book examines internal and external factors in the adolescent's successful psychosocial development. The authors describe the framework of their theory of development assets and then discuss each of the assets. External assets include: support assets; empowerment assets; boundaries-and-expectation assets; and constructive-use-of-time assets. Internal assets include: commitment-to-learning assets; positive values assets; social competency assets; and positive identity assets.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 338.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Decision making, Education, Families, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction

Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. Pathways to prevention: A comprehensive guide to supporting infant and toddler mental health. Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward program leaders and staff members who work with parents and young children, provides guidance for planning, carrying out, and assessing infant-toddler mental health services. Section 1 reviews the history of the mental health initiative of the Head Start Bureau and describes the role of relationships in achieving social and emotional well-being. Section 2 highlights six building blocks that support successful program approaches to infant and toddler mental health. Section 3 includes a list of additional resources.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Head Start, Infant health, Mental health, Parent child relations, Parents, Program development, Program planning, Programs, Relationships, Young children

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2004. Young children develop in an enviroment of relationships. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 12 pp. (Working paper no. 1)

Annotation: This paper discusses the relationship between healthy development and the reliability of a young child's relationships with the important people in his or her life, both within and outside the family. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us, unfounded assertions in the name of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Fathers, Mental health, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parental leave, Programs, Public policy, Relationships, School readiness, School-age children, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.