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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Wells J. n.d.. Promotion of Healthy Behaviors [Final report]. South Bend, IN: Saint Joseph's Medical Center, 20 pp.

Annotation: The objective of this study was to determine whether parents who participated in and completed the parent education program exhibited a decrease in stress, an increase in problem solving and had a stronger parent-child relationship. The project was aimed at parents or caregivers of children under 3 years of age who are of low-income and of varying cultural backgrounds. Three primary methods were used to meet the outcome objectives: group sessions (Approaches to Parenting), newsletter (approaches Bulletin) and seminars. Three measures given at pre-test, short-term post-test, and long-term post-test were used for evaluation. In summary, mothers who participated in the intervention were significantly less stressful, had higher self-esteem, and were less overprotective and rejecting of their children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196855.

Keywords: Caregivers, Health Promotion, Low income groups, Minorities, Parent Education, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents, Stress

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Benson PL, Scales PC, Leffert N, Roehlkepartain EC. 2011. A fragile foundation: The state of developmental assets among American youth (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 153 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of adolescents in terms of developmental assets. The findings are based on data from a survey—"Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors"—that measures 40 developmental assets, or positive factors. The document provides information about the following: the background assets and the young people surveyed; young people's experiences of developmental assets; the deficits and patterns of high risk behavior that compromise young people's healthy development; the power of assets in relation to risky behaviors; an overall goal for well-being; and creative tensions that address challenges and opportunities of the report. Each chapter includes text, figures, and tables of data by grade and gender. Appendices offer additional details of other demographic differences.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 0352.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Cultural factors, Decision making, Education, Families, High risk adolescents, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction, Statistics

Scales PC, Leffert N. 2004. Developmental assets: A synthesis of the scientific research on adolescent development (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 279 pp.

Annotation: This book examines internal and external factors in the adolescent's successful psychosocial development. The authors describe the framework of their theory of development assets and then discuss each of the assets. External assets include: support assets; empowerment assets; boundaries-and-expectation assets; and constructive-use-of-time assets. Internal assets include: commitment-to-learning assets; positive values assets; social competency assets; and positive identity assets.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 338.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Decision making, Education, Families, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction

Lerner C, Ciervo LA. 2004. Getting ready for school begins at birth: How to help your child learn in the early years. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 12 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet helps parents of young children use everyday interactions to teach their children the basic skills they need to cooperate, get along with others, and be enthusiastic learners. The brochure provide tips for helping children develop skills in four key areas: language and literacy, thinking, self-control, and self-confidence. Tips are divided by age ranges (0-12 months, 12-24 months, and 24-36 months). Information about television viewing and imparting values and beliefs is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $30.00 for packet of 20; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-943657-87-3.

Keywords: Child development, Infant development, Language, Learning, Learning activities, Literacy, Moral values, Parent child relations, Parents, School readiness, Self control, Self esteem, Social interaction, Television, Young children

Piper V. 1996 (ca.). LifeSpan Comprehensive Services with Home Visiting [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 8 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: This project sought to meet the developmental needs of pregnant and parenting adolescents, and promote successful health outcomes for their infants. The project combined education and support components of LifeSpan—an established program for pregnant and parenting adolescents—with case management services, including home visiting by trained paraprofessionals. LifeSpan served as an early entry point into medical and social service supports for pregnant adolescents. Comprehensive services ensured that mothers and infants received a continuum of care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 Contact Fax: xxx E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-144719.

Keywords: Adolescent Parents, Case Management, Child Abuse Prevention, Child Neglect, Community Integrated Service System program, Health Education, Health Promotion, Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Home Visiting for At Risk Families, Mother Infant Interaction, Pregnant Adolescents

Dunphy L. 1996 (ca.). Healthy Families Alexandria [Final report]. Falls Church, VA: Northern Virginia Family Service, 22 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: This project targeted first-time mothers in the City of Alexandria who were eligible for medicaid and who had personal or transient risk factors that may predispose them to abusing or neglecting their children. This 3-year project: (1) Ensured adequate prenatal care as prescribed by the clients' medical provider or by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; (2) ensured well-child care and advance optimal child development; (3) improved new mothers' knowledge of child care needs and child behavior; (4) enhanced parent-child interaction, bonding, and parenting skills; and (5) prevented child abuse and neglect among enrollees. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 Contact Fax: xxx E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-144743.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Case Management, Child Abuse Prevention, Child Neglect, Community Integrated Service System program, Hispanics, Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Home Visiting for At Risk Families, Language Barriers, Minority Groups, Paraprofessional Personnel, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Education, Parenting Skills, Prenatal Care, Prenatal Care, Screening, Well Child Care

Bauchner H. 1996. Parent-Focused Intervention to Reduce Pain During Procedures [Final report]. Boston, MA: Trustees of Health and Hospitals of the City of Boston, 27 pp.

Annotation: Invasive procedures are a painful and frightening experience for young children. Although most parents want to be with their children during invasive procedures, many are excluded. Preliminary studies suggest that parental anxiety and physician concern about the success of the procedure, in part, determine why some parents are present and others are not. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple parent-focused intervention can reduce the child's pain during common invasive procedures, reduce parental anxiety, and improve the success of the procedure. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-155360.

Keywords: Parent Education, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents

Wasserman G. 1993. Determinants of Adverse Outcome among Toddlers of Adolescent Mothers [Final report]. New York, NY: Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, 16 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to identify family influences on early childhood development in a sample of high-risk minority children and their mothers. The ways in which maternal personality, parenting and social support impact on the child, and the relative importance of other family members, such as the child's father and/or grandmothers were examined. In general, aspects of family composition and material functioning were found to be better predictors of child outcome than was maternal age. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-218633.

Keywords: Adolescent Parents, Adolescents, Adolescents, Blacks, Early Childhood Development, Families, Family Environment, Hispanics, Hispanics, MCH Research, Minorities, Minority Groups, Mother Infant Interaction, Stress, Urban Population, Urban Populations

Greenberg M. 1993. Familial Adaptation to Developmentally Delayed Children [Final report]. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, 44 pp.

Annotation: This investigation had two major objectives: (a) Determining whether parents of a developmentally delayed child differ from control parents across measures of parent-child interaction attitudes, family status, coping resources, and perceived stress; and (b) identifying the degree of stress perceived by these families and the moderating effect of various coping resources on family adaptation. The hypothesis was that families with a developmentally delayed child report greater stress, and this stress adversely impacts both the family in general and its individual members. The findings reveal that there is great heterogeneity in the family life, stress levels, and coping ability of families with young children with non-specific developmental delays, and having a child with developmental delays is likely to place one at more risk under conditions that might already by challenging, such as single parenting. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB95-208641.

Keywords: Children, Developmentally Delayed, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents, Stress

Simons R. 1992. Nature, Origins, and Consequences of Conceptions of Parenting [Final report]. Ames, IA: Iowa State University, 52 pp.

Annotation: This study investigated the nature, origins, and consequences of adult and adolescent views of the role of the parent (conceptions of parenting). Specifically, the study sought to: (1) Develop a causal model of the determinants of parental behavior, with parenting beliefs constituting a component of the model; and (2) develop and test hypotheses on how parenting beliefs are learned. This portion of the study examined the extent to which beliefs about parenting are transmitted across generations. The findings indicated that determinants of parenting practices include degree of satisfaction with the parent-child relationship and the type of parenting the mother and father received as children. The study also found evidence to support the contention that socialization of parenting beliefs differs by gender of the child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-180206.

Keywords: Adolescents, Parent-child interaction, Parenting attitudes, Parents, School-age children, Siblings

Urbain E. 1991 (ca.). Parent Outreach Project [Final report]. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Foundation, 38 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to develop and demonstrate a replicable, collaborative, interagency prevention intervention model using existing professional casework services, community education, and community-based social support for a population at risk for potential child maltreatment. Important components of the project included home visits by nurses and volunteers. Public health nurses conducted assessments in the home and monitored the developmental progress of the child, while a volunteer "parent befriender" offered support and helped build the parent's self-esteem and strengthened parent-child relationships. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146272.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Counseling for Parents, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Intervention, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents

Yerby M. 1990. Epilepsy in Pregnancy: Developmental Followup of Infants: [Final report]. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, 35 pp.

Annotation: This project studied the effects of epilepsy on pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of the study was to: (1) Examine the outcome of infants exposed in utero to antiepileptic drugs and/or to maternal seizures, and compare their outcome to that of a group of infants without such exposure; and (2) look for correlates in pregnancy (i.e., seizure type and frequency, and antiepileptic drug use) that may predict adverse outcome. A group of pregnant women with epilepsy, a group of nonepileptic pregnant women, and the case and control infants were followed for a period of three years. Case children had a statistically significant higher mean number of minor anomalies per child (5.05) than the control children (3.65). Given the results of the study, with similar rates of malformations with exposure to the common antiepileptic drugs, it was suggested that maternal antiepileptic drugs be chosen for the most effective maternal seizure control. Further research is needed to address the neurodevelopmental effects of these medications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-135870.

Keywords: Bayley Scales, Birth Defects, Breastfeeding, Child Development, Epilepsy, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Neuromotor Status, Parent-Child Interaction, Pregnant Women, Seizures, Stanford-Binet IV

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.