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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 19 (19 total).

Aronson S, ed. 2014. Model child care health policies (5th ed.). Bryn Mawr, PA: American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter; Media, PA: Early Childhood Education Linkage System, Healthy Child Care Pensylvania, 229 pp.

Annotation: These model policies for out-of-home child care providers (both family day care homes and child care centers) are intended for use dependent on the issues and concerns of a particular setting. Contents include admissions/enrollment/attendance; supervision and provision of social-emotional supportive care; planned program, teaching, and guidance; nutrition, food handling, and feeding; physical activity and screen time; daytime sleeping, evening, nighttime, and drop-i care; sanitation and hygiene; environmental health; transportation (motor vehicle, bicycle/tricycle, or other wheeled toys), pedestrian safety, and field trips; health plan; care of children and staff members who are acutely ill or injured; security; emergencies and disasters; child abuse and neglect (child maltreatment); smoking, prohibited substances, and weapons; human resources and personnel policies; design and maintenance of the physical plant and contents; and review and revision of policies, plans and procedures. The appendices contain sample forms, logs, checklists, records, and sample letters that may be reproduced for any use except resale. This section also includes a list of resources for staff, training, publishers of technical standards, and health education materials.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter, Rose Tree Corporate Cnter II, 1400 N. Providence Road, Suite 3007, Media, PA 19063-2043, Telephone: (800) 243-2357 Secondary Telephone: (215) 520-9125 E-mail: syunghans@paaap.org Web Site: http://www.paaap.org Available from the website; Hard copies available from AAP Bookstore for $40.00, plus shipping and handling, $35.00, plus shipping and handling for AAP members.. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-826-2.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child safety, Guidelines, Models, Out of home care, Policy development, Standards

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care. 2013. Stepping stones to caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards–Guidelines for early care and education programs: Protecting children from harm (3rd ed.). Denver, CO: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This booklet contains 138 standards to advance the quality and safety of early care and education environments. It is a companion to Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards -- Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd edition (CFOC3). The booklet comprises a subset of the standards contained in CFO3, including new and updated standards on safe sleep, handling and feeding of human milk, introducing solid foods to infants, monitoring children's development, unimmunized children, preventing expulsions, and availability of drinking water. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children with special health care needs, Facilities, Health promotion, Learning activities, Management, Nutrition, Out of home care, Personnel, Safety, Spanish language materials, Standards

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health and Frank Porter Graham Chid Development Institute. 2013. National Training Institute (NTI) for Child Care Health Consultants . Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, multiple items.

Annotation: This website comprises materials developed by the Healthy Child Care America train-the-trainer program to address the needs of child care health consultants. Contents include modules and toolkits on topics such as consulting, curriculum development, caring for children who are ill, child maltreatment, children with special health needs, environmental health (including lead), the field of child care, infectious disease, injury prevention, mental health, nutrition and physical activity, oral health, quality in child care, and staff health. Evaluation forms, templates, and a training checklist are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child maltreatment, Children with special health care needs, Communicable diseases, Curriculum development, Environmental health, Infections, Injury prevention, Lead, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Out of home care, Physical activity, Qualitative evaluation, Training

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Benjamin SE, ed. 2012. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the Caring For Our Children national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs (2nd ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, 72 pp.

Annotation: This revised manual is intended to help child care providers provide children with safe and healthy food and meet nutrition standards. The manual discusses the following topics: (1) keeping everything clean and safe, (2) using foods that are safe to eat, (3) storing foods safely, (4) planning to meet children's nutritional needs, (5) promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and (6) helping children and families learn about food. References are included. The manual includes three appendices: (1) Caring for Our Children standards, (2) community resources, and (3) resource list. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, University of North Carolina, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 116-A South Merritt Mill Road, CB# 8126, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8126, Telephone: (919) 966-3780 Fax: (919) 843-4752 E-mail: nti@unc.edu Web Site: http://www.nti.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Center for Law and Social Policy and Zero to Three. 2011. Charting progress for babies in child care: Policy framework (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy and Zero to Three, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document sets forth four key principles that establish the foundation of supports that all infants and young children in child care need, as well as 15 recommendations that state child care licensing, quality, and subsidy policies should address. It is part of a multi-year effort to identify state policies that support the healthy development of infants and young children in child care settings and to build an online resource to help states implement these policies.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Infants, Licensing, Out of home care, Policy development, Resources for professionals, State legislation, Young children

Loeb S, Fuller B, Kagan SL, Carrol J, Carroll, J. 2003. Child care in poor communities: Early learning effects of type, quality, and stability. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 34 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9954)

Annotation: This paper reviews the status of young children in poor communities who are spending more hours in non-parental care due to policy reforms and expansion of early childhood programs. Topics include maternal employment, child care selection, local supply conditions, quality of care, and the impact on child development and child school readiness skills. The study methods, data analysis, results, and discussion are detailed. References and eleven tables of statistical data are provided.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Intellectual development, Low income groups, Out of home care, Policy analysis, Research, Statistical data, Welfare reform, Working mothers, Young children

Smolensky E, Gootman JA, eds.; National Research Council, Committee on Family and Work Policies. 2003. Working families and growing kids: Caring for children and adolescents. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 368 pp.

Annotation: This book identifies opportunities that have the potential to improve the quality of child and adolescent development through new or expanded public policies that respond directly to the conditions shaping working families. The book looks at a variety of family and work trends, including the growing population of mothers in the work force with young children, the increasing reliance on nonparent child care, the significant challenge facing families on welfare, and a better overall understanding of how family and work policies affect child and adolescent development. The book also evaluates the support systems available to working families and presents findings and next steps. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. A reference section and an index are included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-08703-2.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child care, Child development, Children, Families, Family support, Low income groups, Out of home care, Public policy, Statistics, Trends, Working mothers, Working parents

Brazelton TB, Greenspan SI. 2000. The irreducible needs of children: What every child must have to grow, learn, and flourish. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 228 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the most basic needs in children that must be met to ensure that they will thrive. The first six chapters deal with six of the seven irreducible needs of children: for ongoing nurturing relationships; for physical protection, safety, and regulation; for experiences tailored to individual differences; for developmentally appropriate experiences; for limit setting, structure, and expectations; for stable, supportive communities and cultural continuity. The seventh chapter addresses the need to protect the future by developing a world that offers future generations of children a secure and safe world that fosters their development. Appendixes include the Touchpoints model; a functional development growth chart and questionnaire; a list of organizations working to promote child welfare; and references.

Contact: Perseus Books Group, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301, Telephone: (800) 386-5656 Fax: (303) 449-3356 E-mail: westvieworders@perseusbooks.com Web Site: http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7382-0325-4.

Keywords: Child care, Child welfare, Children, Community role, Development, Early childhood education, Family relations, Foster care, Infants, Out of home care, Physical development, Psychological development, Socialization

Graves DE, Suitor CW, Holt KA, eds. 1997. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 86 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended to help child care providers offer children healthy, safe foods that meet the nutrition standards presented in National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs. Chapters cover cleanliness, ways to ensure that foods are safe to eat, planning to meet children's nutritional needs, promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and helping children and families learn about foods. Appendices contain lists of resources and materials for centers and for parents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHI085.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

Briseet-Chapman S, Issacs-Shockley M, comps. 1997. Children in social peril: A community vision for preserving family care of African American children and youth. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 51 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings summarize the work, strategies, and recommendations of an African American Child Welfare Summit that was designed to come up with solutions for reducing out of home placement of African American children and to come up with an idea for the African American community of the future. Among the topics discussed are: 1) the summit issues and challenges, 2) the African American community of the future, 3) strategies and recommendations, and 4) implications for culturally attuned leadership. An appendix lists participants in the conference.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87868-685-1.

Keywords: Blacks, Conference proceedings, Family preservation, Family support programs, Foster care, Out of home care

Curtis PA, Boyd JD, Liepold M, Petit M. 1996. Child abuse and neglect: A look at the states—The CWLA stat book. Washington, DC: CWLA Press, 158 pp.

Annotation: This compilation presents state statistics on child abuse and neglect, out-of-home care, adoption, finance and administration of state programs, risk factors, and prevention efforts. This title was previously called "Child Welfare Stat Book."

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $26.95 plus shipping and handling; no shipping and handling if prepaid. Also available on diskette (Excel v.5.0 only) for Macintosh and Windows, call (202) 638-2952 for details. Document Number: ISBN 0-87868-628-2.

Keywords: Administration, Adolescents, Adoption, Budgets, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Data, Financing, Maltreated children, Out of home care, Physical abuse, Prevention, Risk factors, Sexual abuse, State government

DeWoody M, Ceja K, Sylvester M. 1993. Independent living services for youths in out-of-home care. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 53 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews the needs of youths in out of home care who are making the transition to independent living. It also assesses the federal Independent Living Program, the resources the program has brought to the child welfare field, the projects it has supported, and the gaps that continue to exist. It also reports on a 1992 survey of youth-serving agencies conducted by the Child Welfare League of America.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 5820.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child welfare, Federal programs, Foster care, Independent living centers, Out of home care, Residential care, Transition to independent living, Youth services

Neal MB, Chapman NJ, Ingersoll-Dayton B, Emlen AC. 1993. Balancing work and caregiving for children, adults, and elders. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 292 pp. (Family caregiver applications series; v. 3)

Annotation: This book explores how employees with caregiver roles juggle the responsibilities of work and family. The authors consider multiple factors that contribute to the experience of stress and work-related outcomes such as absenteeism; review policies, benefits, and services from the perspectives of the employee and the employer; analyze methods for assessing employee needs; and provide recommendations for national and local policies.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Out of home care, Working parents

Cahn K, Johnson P, eds. 1993. Children can't wait: Reducing delays in out-of-home care. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 144 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the problem of delays in the adoption process for children in foster care. It looks at the success of four projects in Michigan, Kentucky, Washington, and New York, funded under the Adoption Opportunities program of the U.S. Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau. The Adoption Opportunities grants were intended to reduce the length of time children waited to be legally free, by resolving problems between courts and agencies. The authors also discuss how aggressively this issue can be pursued.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 5103.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare agencies, Federal grants, Foster care, Foster children, Legal issues, Out of home care, Residential care

Stroul BA. 1993. Systems of care for children and adolescents with severe emotional disturbances: What are the results?. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the development of systems of mental health care and their goals, the target population, the array of services available, and evaluation of the outcomes. An appendix lists certain outcomes of real projects in various states, such as fewer children who need out-of-home placement or hospitalization, and improved functioning in behavior and school performance.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html $5.00 includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Community based services, Health care systems, Hospitalization, Interagency cooperation, Out-of-home care, Service delivery systems

Pires SA, ed., Board on Children and Families, National Forum on the Future of Children and Families. 1993. International Child Welfare Systems: Report of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 87 pp.

Annotation: This workshop, with participants from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Denmark, France, and Germany, compared the status of children, and the practices of the child welfare systems in the different countries. The participants discussed such topics as the role of the individual and the state, characteristics of children in care and the prevalence and types of residential and other out-of-home care, child abuse and neglect and how it is handled, and training of social welfare workers.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child care, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children's rights, Cultural factors, Evaluation, Government role, Interagency cooperation, International health, International programs, Juvenile courts, Out of home care, Service delivery systems

U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. 1988. Healthy children: Investing in the future. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Office of Technology Assessment; Washington, DC: for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 301 pp., summ. (24 pp.).

Annotation: This report addresses the effectiveness and costs of selected strategies for promoting and maintaining the health of children and identifies strategies whose implementation could substantially improve children's health or lower health care costs. It opens with a discussion of children and health insurance issues, both private insurance and Medicaid. Charts and tables from the Rand Corporation's Health Insurance Study are included. Two chapters focus specifically on the prevention of unintentional childhood injuries and the prevention of child maltreatment. The chapter on child maltreatment provides a definition of child abuse and neglect, estimates for the incidence and prevalence of child maltreatment, causes and effects of child maltreatment, and a discussion regarding the effectiveness of preventive strategies and programs.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: OTA-H-345.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child abuse, Child neglect, Injury prevention, Insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, Neonatal screening, Out of home care, Prenatal care, Prevention

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.