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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Office of Behavioral Health Equity and Chau V. 2020. The opioid crisis and the Hispanic/Latino population: An urgent issue. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief addresses contextual issues related to opioid misuse and opioid use disorder in Hispanic/Latino communities, including national data, pain management, and sociocultural factors associated with accessing services, and strategies to address these problems.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA PEP20-05-02-002.

Keywords: Access to health care, Hispanic Americans, Opiates, Substance abuse, Substance use disorders, Treatment

Seabury, H. 2019. In her words: Opioid use disorder and pregnancy. Fort Wayne, IN: McMillen Health, 23 pp. (Community report)

Annotation: This report presents information about opioid use during pregancy. The report provides definitions of terms used, an overview of the problem, the impact of opioid use disorder during pregnancy on infants, interviews with mothers being treated for opioid use disorder, interviews with professionals, and results. The development of an educational intervention is also discussed.

Contact: McMillen Health, 600 Jim Kelley Boulevard, Fort Wayne, IN 46816, Telephone: (888) 240-7268 Secondary Telephone: (260) 456-4511 Web Site: http://mcmillenhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Intervention, Neonatal addiction, Opiates, Pregnant women, Substance abuse, Substance dependence

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Medicaid coverage of medication-assisted treatment for alcohol and opioid use disorders and of medication for the reversal of opioid overdose. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report presents summary information on Medicaid coverage and financing of medications to treat alcohol and opioid use disorders (MAT). It discusses issues including prior authorization, innovative approaches to financing and delivering MAT, state considerations for covering MAT (including efficacy, costs, regulations, and policies), and innovative models and best practices.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS SMA-18-5093 .

Keywords: Alcohol dependence, Drugs, Health care financing, Medicaid, Opiates, Substance abuse treatment

Clevenger AA. 2017. Overdose poisoning deaths to children in Virginia, 2009-2013. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations from case reviews of overdose poison deaths among infants, children, and adolescents up to age 17 in Virginia for the five year period between 2009 and 2013. Topics include how overdose is impacting infants and children and their families in Virginia, which children are at risk, where are they at risk, how are they at risk, and what can be done to further promote health and safety in their lives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 400 East Jackson Street, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 786-3174 Fax: (804) 371-8595 E-mail: OCME_CENT@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/medical-examiner Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Child death review, Child safety, Children, Health promotion, High risk groups, Household safety, Infants, Injury prevention, Opiates, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Virginia

Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Unit. 2017. Opioid prescribing guidelines for dentists. Portland, OR: Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Unit, 1 p.

Annotation: This document for dentists provides guidelines on prescribing opioids. Appropriate dosages, types of medication to prescribe, prescribing refills, using guidelines for pain management, and ensuring that patients know how to secure medication and dispose of leftover medication are discussed. Alternatives to prescribing opioids are presented. Information is included on how to obtain the document in large print, Braille, non- English languages, or other formats.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Program, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 850, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-0348 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-0240 E-mail: oral.health@state.or.us Web Site: https://public.health.oregon.gov/PreventionWellness/oralhealth/Pages/index.aspx

Keywords: Guidelines, Medications, Opiates, Pain, Non English language materials, Prescription drugs

Surgeon General of the United States, Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2016. Turn the Tide. [Washington, DC:] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for health professionals and their clients provide information about opioids and describe ways to reduce the risk of opioid addiction and overdose. Information about taking opioids, safe storage and disposal, a help line, and options for sharing personal experiences are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, National initiatives, Opiates, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety, Self help programs

Ko HY, Patrick SW, Tong VT, Patel R, Lind JN, Barfield WD. 2016. Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome: 28 states, 1999–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802,

Annotation: This report examines state trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) incidence using all-payer, hospital inpatient delivery discharges compiled in the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) during 1999–2013. The findings underscore the importance of state-based public health programs to prevent unnecessary opioid use and to treat substance use disorders during pregnancy, as well as decrease the incidence of NAS.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Measures, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Pregnant women, State programs, Statistical data, Substance use disorders, Trends

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Pennsylvania Medical Society and Pennsylvania Dental Association. 2016. Pennsylvania guidelines on the use of opioids in dental practice. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 4 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended to help health professionals improve patient outcomes and avoid potential adverse outcomes associated with using opioids to treat acute dental pain. Contents include how to incorporate key practices into caring for patients receiving opioids for pain.

Contact: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 777 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 8820, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8820, Telephone: (717) 558-7750 Secondary Telephone: (800) 228-7823 Fax: (717) 558-7830 E-mail: stat@pamedsoc.org Web Site: https://www.pamedsoc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Dental care, Dentistry, Opiates, Oral health, Pain, Palliative treatment, Patient care, Pennsylvania, Treatment outcome

Rudd RA, Seth P, Felicita D, Scholl L. 2016. Increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths: United States, 2010–2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(50–51):1445–1452,

Annotation: This report examines overall drug overdose death rates during 2010-2015 and opioid overdose death rates during 2014–2015 by subcategories (natural/semisynthetic opioids, methadone, heroin, and synthetic opioids other than methadone). Rates are stratified by demographics, region, and by 28 states with high quality reporting on death certificates of specific drugs involved in overdose deaths. Implications for public health practice are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic pain, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Heroin, Illicit drugs, Methadone, Mortality rates, Opiates, Prescription drugs, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services

Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. 2016. CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for chronic pain–United States, 2016. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: Recommendations and Reports 65(1):1–49,

Annotation: This guideline provides recommendations for primary care clinicians who are prescribing opioids for chronic pain outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. The guidelines address (1) when to initiate or continue opioids for chronic pain; (2) opioid selection, dosage, duration, follow-up, and discontinuation; and (3) assessing risk and addressing harms of opioid use. A checklist for prescribing opioids for chronic pain and a website with additional tools to guide clinicians in implementing the recommendations are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic pain, Guidelines, Multimedia, Opiates, Primary care, Training

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Reducing neonatal abstinence syndrome in Tennessee. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights partnerships to address the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) epidemic in Tennessee. Topics include efforts to expand a community-based program to assist mothers with substance abuse problems and ensure a drug-free and safe home for their newborns; provide start-up costs for a regional detox center for women addicted to prescription drugs; research the effectiveness of detox from opiate drugs during pregnancy, and the long-term effect of detox treatment on NAS rates in the state; and establish a hospital-based NAS treatment process.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Drug use during pregnancy, Financing, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention program, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment, Tennessee

Ramakrishnan M. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: How states can help advance the knowledge base for primary prevention and best practices of care. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes opportunities to avert or ameliorate the outcome of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) along a continuum of care spanning timeframes in the mother's and infant's life and the role of state health agencies. Topics include surveillance for NAS-affected infants and the sources of maternal opiate use; reimbursement for using screening protocols to detect substance abuse early in pregnancy and withdrawal signs in newborns; development of measures to ensure follow-up with opioid-dependent women and receipt of comprehensive services; and collaborative efforts to strengthen clinical standards for identification, management, and follow-up with NAS-affected infants and their families. A state index of resources is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Intervention, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal addiction, Newborn infants, Opiates, Population surveillance, Primary prevention, Screening, State health agencies, Substance use

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Strategies for states and health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources, from a webinar held on July 16, 2014, highlight strategies for preventing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Contents include a recording of the speaker's presentations (1 hour, 27 min., 23 sec.), the webinar agenda and speaker biographies, and related materials. Topics include recent trends in opioid abuse and NAS, with an overview of federally-led prevention efforts; the impact of rising NAS rates across the states, including implications for Medicaid and examples of state-level action; a health plan-led initiative to improve care coordination and social support for pregnant women in treatment for addiction; and the latest in NAS treatment, and an assessment of where public and private investments would be most beneficial.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Drug effects, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Model programs, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborns, Opiates, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.