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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (30 total).

University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research. 2013–. National health security preparedness index. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research, annual.

Annotation: This index identifies strengths and gaps in the protections needed to keep people safe and healthy in the face of large-scale public health threats, and tracks how these protections vary across the U.S. and change over time. Contents include current and past findings and methodology, key changes, data, measures, guiding principles, and frequently asked questions. Topics include health security surveillance, community planning and engagement coordination, incident and information management, health care delivery, countermeasure management, and environmental and occupational health.

Keywords: Community coordination, Community participation, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Environmental health, Hazards, Health care delivery, Management information systems, Measures, Occupational health, Population surveillance, Safety, Trends

Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation. 2010. North American guidelines for children's agricultural tasks. [Marshfield, WI]: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation,

Annotation: This electronic resource presents guidelines to help adults match a child's physical and mental abilities with the requirements of different agricultural jobs. They are intended to help reduce childhood agricultural injuries. Topics include animal care, manual labor, implement and haying operations, tractor fundamentals, and other tasks. Some of the guidelines are available in Spanish.

Contact: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, 1000 North Oak Avenue, Marshfield, WI 54449, Telephone: (800) 782-8581 Fax: (715) 389-3319 Web Site: http://www.marshfieldclinic.org/research/pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Agricultural injuries, Child safety, Guidelines, Injury prevention, Motor development, Occupational safety and health, Psychological development, Spanish language materials

Pfizer. 2006. Milestones in public health: Accomplishments in public health over the last 100 years. New York, NY: Pfizer, 275 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of milestones in public health during the last century in the United States. The milestones discussed are those identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are advances in (1) addiction, (2) automotive safety, (3) cancer, (4) cardiovascular disease, (5) environmental and occupational health, (6) food safety, (7) infectious disease control, (8) maternal and child health, (9) oral health, and (10) vaccines. One chapter in the book is devoted to each milestone. Each chapter is written by a different expert, and each explores historical developments related to the milestone and presents a case study of the milestone and a vignette illustrating another facet of the milestone. Predictions of advances still to come are offered, as well. The book includes a prologue, an epilogue, and references. Also available as a course.

Contact: Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 733-2323 Web Site: http://www.pfizer.com/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Child health, Children, Communicable disease control, Distance education, Drug addiction, Environmental health, Food safety, History, History, Infants, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Parents, Public health, Vaccines, Women's health

Waters TR, Wilkins JR. 2004. Conference proceedings: Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for children and adolescents working in agriculture. Cincinnati, OH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of a national conference held in Cincinatti, Ohio, on May 6-7, 2002. The conference, co-sponsored by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Great Lakes Center for Agricultural Safety and Health at Ohio State University, brought together national experts from across the United States to discuss research needs regarding prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders for children and adolescents working in agriculture. The report includes an executive summary, a background section, a list of key terms, a description of the meeting format, a summary of panel discussions, summary findings, references, and a list of attendees.

Contact: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Patriots Plaza Building , 395 East Street, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.org Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.html Available from the website. Document Number: NIOSH pub. no. 2004-119.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Agricultural safety, Child health, Conferences, Musculoskeletal diseases, Occupational safety and health, Prevention, Research

Cermack SA. [2003]. Boston University Occupational Therapy Leadership Center: [Final report]. Boston, MA: Office of Sponsored Programs, Boston University, 451 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Boston University Occupational Therapy Leadership Center project during the period 1997-2003. The purpose of the project was to improve the health status of mothers and children by training leaders in pediatric occupational therapy who are knowledgeable about broader issues and aspects of health and can have an impact on intervention for children and their families in practice, research, education, and advocacy, and in influencing public policy related to health care.Topics include (1) purpose of project, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of support needed to replicate.The report contains 14 appendices, including presentations, forms, publications, fact sheets, and other related materials. A CD-ROM is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Families, Final reports, Health care delivery, Leadership, Massachusetts, Occupational therapy, Public policy, Women's health

Montana Schools Boards Association and Montana Office of Public Instruction. 2003. Communicable diseases: Model policies and procedures for HIV education, infected students and staff, and work site safety. Helena, MT: Montana Office of Public Instruction, 24 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides guidelines for teachers, principals, and other educators and school trustees in developing policies and procedures in addressing AIDS and HIV issues among staff, students, parents, and the community in Montana. Section topics include education, rights and accommodations, and worksite safety. Discussion topics include the role of public health and medical communities in assessing the risk of transmission of various communicable diseases to determine how best to protect the health of both students and staff, privacy rights, the role of the school nurse, parental notification, physical or special examinations, rights and accommodations of staff, reporting suspected or confirmed cases of communicable disease, employment issues, and prevention of disease transmission. A brief list of resources is available.

Contact: Montana Office of Public Instruction, P.O. Box 202501, Helena, MT 59620-2501, Telephone: (406) 444-3095 Secondary Telephone: (888) 231-9393 E-mail: OPISupt@mt.gov Web Site: http://opi.mt.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Communicable diseases, Confidentiality, Disease prevention, Disease transmission, HIV, Health policy, Montana, Occupational safety and health, Policy development, School age children, School health education, School nurses, School personnel, State initiatives

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training and Education. 2000. Maternal and child health training program: [Fact sheets]. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training and Education, 15 pp.

Annotation: These fact sheets describe the fifteen leadership training programs in maternal and child health. The training programs are in the following areas: continuing education and development, social work, pediatric occupational therapy, pediatric physical therapy, graduate medical education in historically black colleges and universities, adolescent health, maternal and child health leadership education in neurodevelopmental and related disabilities, behavioral pediatrics, nursing, schools of public health, pediatric pulmonary centers, the maternal and child health training program, nutrition, communication disorders, and pediatric dentistry. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health, Behavioral sciences, Blacks, Communication disorders, Continuing education, Graduate education, Leadership training, Lung diseases, MCH training programs, Medical education, Neural development, Nursing, Nutrition, Pediatric dentistry, Pediatric occupational therapy, Physical therapy, Public health education, Social work

Clayton S, Brindis C, Hamor J, Raiden-Wright H, Fong C. 2000. Investing in adolescent health: A social imperative for California's future. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, National Adolescent Health Information Center, 97 pp., exec. summ. (8 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents a plan, by the California Adolescent Health Collaborative (ACH), to improve the health of adolescents in California. The report covers three main topics: (1) understanding adolescent health and the issues; (2) eight recommendations for improving adolescent health; and (3) strategies for seven outcome areas--injury prevention; mental health and suicide; nutrition and physical activity ; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; oral health; and environmental and occupational health. Reference are included. An executive summary is available separately. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Adolescents, California, Drug use behavior, Environmental health, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Physical activity, Prevention, Strategic plans, Suicide prevention, Tobacco use

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1999. Promoting safe work for young workers: A community-based approach—A resource guide documenting the experiences of three young worker projects. Cincinnati, OH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report reflects the lessons learned from three community based health education projects on young worker issues. The projects took place in Brockton, Massachusetts; Oakland, California; and Los Angeles, California. The report begins with a section of project summaries and continues with sections dealing with facts about young workers safety and health, steps in coordinating a young worker project, and working with community partners. Additional resources including child labor laws, agencies and organizations, and resource materials are listed in the appendices. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent employment, California, Child labor, Community based services, Massachusetts, Occupational safety and health, Working adolescents, Youth

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1999. The top ten public health achievements in the 20th century. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 items.

Annotation: This resource features a series of reports published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports between April and December 1999 on 10 public health achievements, reflecting the successful response of public health to the major causes of morbidity and mortality for the period 1900-1999. Topics include vaccination, motor-vehicle safety, workplace safety, control of infectious diseases, decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke, safer and healthier foods, healthier mothers and babies, family planning, fluoridation of drinking water, and tobacco as a health hazard. Critical changes in the U.S. public health system during the century are also addressed.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Cardiovascular diseases, Children, Families, Family planning, Fluorides, Food safety, Health policy, History, Infant health, Infection control, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Public health, Strokes, Systems development, Tobacco use, Vaccination effects, Water

National Center for Health Statistics. 1997. Women: Work and health. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 100 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 3, Analytical and epidemiological studies; no. 31)

Annotation: This report describes the sociodemographics, household characteristics, and health of women according to workforce status and job conditions. The report also presents data on men for comparison. Summary data on physical conditions and exposures, health conditions attributed to work, other health conditions that impact on work, health promotion in the workplace, and health-related benefits provided by employers are also reported. Most estimates are shown according to sex, age, race, ethnicity, educational attainment, and major occupational group.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 97-1415.

Keywords: Health, Health promotion, Occupational safety and health, Personnel, Reports, Statistics, Women

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1997. Maternal and Child Health Center for Leadership in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Education: Application kit for CFDA 93.110TH—Application guidance, including form PHS-6025-1. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 24 pp.

Annotation: This document explains the Maternal and Child Health Center for Leadership in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Education grant application process. It includes Bureau directives, lists specific requirements and program elements for MCH leadership in pediatric occupational therapy education, and explains the application process. Appendices include additional instructions and guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Applications, Children with special health care needs, Federal grants, Infants with special health care needs, Leadership, MCH training programs, Manuals, Pediatric occupational therapy

National Committee for Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention. 1996. Children and agriculture: Opportunities for safety and health—A national action plan. Marshfield, WI: Marshfield Clinic, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an action plan which would reduce the number of agricultural injuries to children and adolescents involved in agriculture whether as workers or bystanders. It includes the objectives and makes recommendations for reducing the frequency and severity of childhood agricultural injuries. Side bars elaborate issues raised by the committee members while they were developing the plan; a key for each objective identifies stakeholders who may play a role in achieving that objective. The report includes biographical sketches of the committee members, bibliographical references, and suggested readings. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescents, Agricultural injuries, Children, Farm machinery, Injury prevention, Occupational safety and health, Rural populations, Strategic plans

James Bowman Associates. 1996. Enhancing health in the Head Start workplace: Training guides for the Head Start learning community. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 135 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of these training modules for Head Start managers and directors is to increase their understanding and skills about occupational safety and health. Specific topics include identifying the ways in which employee health affects the organization's effectiveness, designing training programs that encourage employees to improve their own health, understanding how the organization contributes to the overall health of its employees, and implementing policies that allow employees to enjoy the best health possible.

Contact: Education Resources Information Center, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20208, Telephone: (202) 219-1385 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.eric.ed.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-042579-0.

Keywords: Head Start, Occupational safety and health, Training materials

James Bowman Associates. 1995 (ca.). Laying a foundation in health and wellness: Training guides for the Head Start learning community. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 79 pp.

Annotation: This training guide for Head Start staff explains how important health is to Head Start's central mission, what they need to know about health and wellness in Head Start. An opportunity to arrive at personal definitions of health, encouraging a comprehensive view of health and well-being is offered. A vision of health services is articulated to clarify for Head Start staff how they contribute to the health of children, families and fellow staff members through daily activities and role modeling.

Contact: Education Resources Information Center, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20208, Telephone: (202) 219-1385 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.eric.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Head Start, Health, Health services, Occupational safety and health

Kenen RH. 1993. Reproductive hazards in the workplace: Mending jobs, managing pregnancies. Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park Press, 306 pp. (Haworth women's studies)

Annotation: This book documents and explains the wide variety of workplace hazards faced by women with the purpose of helping women to reduce occupational risks while achieving the larger social objective of protecting all women's occupational health and safety. Key topics include: the biology of reproduction; the impact of the physical and social work environment on the pregnant woman; how to identify and minimize or avoid hazards in various types of work environments; how to weigh risks in the workplace and obtain accurate information about risks; and innovative approaches taken by women to make work safe and healthy, including successful organizing and lobbying techniques. Appendices contain lists of protective legislation, governmental regulatory agencies, and resource organizations.

Contact: Haworth Press, Taylor and Francis, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042, Telephone: (800) 634-7064 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: orders@taylorandfrancis.com Web Site: http://www.tandfonline.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Occupational safety and health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Reproductive hazards, Teratology, Women's health

Greenspan SI. 1992. Infancy and early childhood: The practice of clinical assessment and intervention with emotional and developmental changes. Madison, CT: International Universities Press, 814 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a systematic framework for the clinical assessment, treatment, and prevention of emotional and developmental problems in infants and young children. The first chapter describes the six developmental levels that affect a child's maturation. Subsequent chapters focus on taking a developmental history, utilizing the Functional Emotional Assessment Scale, and selecting the appropriate therapeutic approach. Several chapters discuss floor time activities for parents, educators, and therapists. Interactive, regulatory, and multisystem developmental disorders are discussed. Appendices include discussions of speech pathology, occupational therapy, and ego development as well as a list of available assessment tools and a guide to establishing clinical infant and child development programs.

Contact: International Universities Press, Inc., 59 Boston Post Road, Madison, CT 06443, Telephone: (203) 245-4000 Fax: (203) 245-0775 E-mail: info@iup.com Web Site: http://www.iup.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8236-2633-4.

Keywords: Assessment, Assessment tools, Case studies, Child development, Child health, Child psychology, Children with special health care needs, Developmental psychology, Developmental stages, Early intervention, Ego development, Emotional development, Infant development, Infant health, Infants with special health care needs, Mental health, Occupational therapy, Personality development, Program development, Psychotherapy, Speech tests

Children's Safety Network. 1991. A data book of child and adolescent injury. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 69 pp., 41 slides.

Annotation: This data book and a related set of slides present information on the nature and incidence of unintentional and intentional injuries among U.S. children and adolescents ages 1–19. The book is divided into five sections: (1) Overview—comparisons between injury and diseases, international comparisons; (2) mortality—major causes of injury by developmental stage, mortality data compared to morbidity data; (3) unintentional injury—motor vehicles, pedestrians, bicycles, drowning and near drowning, fires and burns, unintentional firearms, poisoning, falls, occupational injuries, farm injuries, sports, toys and recreational equipment; (4) violence—homicide, assault, suicide, child abuse and neglect, rape; and (5) interventions—chart by age group, the cost of injury, suggestions for ways to prevent child and adolescent injury. An appendix presents 1988 injury mortality rates for children ages 1–4, 5–9, 10–14, and 15–19, for 11 major injury categories. Federal agencies contributing data include the National Center for Health Statistics, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Department of Justice, and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Publication and slides available for loan; publication also available from ERIC Document Reproduction Service, 7420 Fullerton Road, Suite 110, Springfield, VA 22153-2852. Telephone: (800) 443-ERIC / e-mail: EDRS@inet.ed.gov / website: http://edrs.com/; gopher://edrs.com. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE049; MCHF098 (slides), MCHF108 (brochure); book ERIC ED 342 152.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Child development, Child health, Children, Costs, Data, Firearm injuries, Infants, Injuries, Integration, Morbidity, Mortality, Occupational injuries, Planning, Preschool children, Recreational injuries, Residential injuries, Safety equipment, Schools, Slides, Suicide, Toddlers, Transportation injuries, Violence

Children's Safety Network. 1991. Child Health Day 1991: A selected annotated bibliography. [Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health], 31 pp.

Annotation: This annotated bibliography includes items recommended by members of the planning committee for Child Health Day 1991. Sections of the bibliography address overviews of injury issues; injury data; program components (overview, program development, advocacy, coalition building, and training); and injury types and causes (overview, bicycles, child care, drowning, falls, firearms, fire/burns, motor vehicles, occupational injuries, pedestrians, playgrounds, sports, toys, and violence). The bibliography also contains resource lists. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (703) 625-7802 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE014.

Keywords: Advocacy, Bicycles, Burns, Child Care, Children, Coalitions, Curricula, Data, Directories, Drowning, Educational materials, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Health observances, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Pedestrians, Playgrounds, Program development, Sports, Toys, Traffic safety, Violence

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1988-. NIOSH research and demonstration grants, fiscal year 19__. Atlanta, GA: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, annual.

Annotation: This annual report provides a readily available source of information on the status and scope of the research grants program of NIOSH. It is intended to be most useful to investigators in biomedical science, engineering and related disciplines. Areas covered include occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, traumatic injuries, cardiovascular disease, disorders of reproduction, dermatologic conditions, psychological disorders, neurotoxic disorders, noise-induced hearing loss, control techniques, respirator research and other occupational needs. Tables, figures and graphs are included as well as a grant number index, principal investigator index, and grantee institution index.

Contact: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Patriots Plaza Building , 395 East Street, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Contact Phone: (404) 639-3343 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.org Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.html Available at no charge.

Keywords: Financing, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Occupational injuries, Research methodology

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.