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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (126 total).

Ashbrook A, Hartline-Grafton H, Dolins J, Davis J, Watson C. 2017. Addressing food insecurity: A toolkit for pediatricians. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics and Food Research and Action Council, 38 pp.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help pediatricians and their practice teams screen for food insecurity, connect families with food and nutrition resources in the community, and support national and local policies that increase access to adequate healthy food for all children and their families. Contents include an infographic, information on food insecurity and federal nutrition programs, tips on preparing for and using the Hunger Vital Sign (a validated screening tool), interventions to address food insecurity, and resources to support advocacy and educational efforts.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Consumer education, Families, Federal programs, Food, Intervention, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutrition programs, Pediatric care, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Screening

Harris JL, Haraghey KS, Choi Y-Y, Fleming-Milici F. 2017. Parents' attitudes about food marketing to children: 2012 to 2015–Opportunities and challenges to creating demand for a healthier food environment. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of a survey of parents with children and adolescents ages 2 to 17 to measure parents' attitudes about food marketing and other influences on children's eating habits and their support for policies to promote healthy eating for their children. Topics include parents' opinions about food industry self-regulation, including the ages of children who should be protected from unhealthy food marketing and whether they believe that individual food companies have delivered on their pledges to limit food advertising to children. The report also examines parents' willingness to participate in a variety of actions to encourage companies to reduce unhealthy food marketing to their children. A series of infographics is also available.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Beliefs, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Consumer surveys, Food consumption, Marketing, Nutrition, Parent participation, Parenting attitudes, Policy development

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

Piekarz E, Schermbeck R, Young SK, Leider J, Ziemann M, Chriqui JF. 2016. School district wellness policies: Evaluating progress and potential for improving children's health eight years after the federal mandate–Volume 4. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 184 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reports key findings from a comprehensive, ongoing, nationwide evaluation of written school district wellness policies. Contents include data from school years 2006–2007 through 2013–2014, the first eight years following the required implementation data for wellness policies. Topics include background on the federal requirement for school district wellness policies, methodology for assessing policy strength and district characteristics, comprehensiveness and strength of wellness policies, key findings of wellness policy provisions, and future research needs.

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, 5th Floor, Chicago, IL 60608-1264, Telephone: (312) 996-7222 Secondary Telephone: (866) 757-4507 Fax: (312) 996-2703 E-mail: IHRPinfo@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health policy, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Regulations, Research, School districts, School food services, Trends

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition. 2016. Be a school wellness champion: Outreach toolkit. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to assist school districts in talking with parents and school staff about wellness policies and increasing their involvement in the process. Contents include a letter to principals, parent flyer, newsletter insert, presentation slides, and social media posts about local school wellness policies. The customizable templates can be adapted to meet district's specific needs.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 632, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 305-1624 Fax: (703) 305-2549 Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Nutrition, Parents, Policy development, School districts

Trust for America's Health. 2015-. State of childhood obesity. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, annual.

Annotation: This resource provides information about obesity among young children, adolescents, and adults in the United States. Contents include obesity rates and trends by age, household income, and race and ethnicity; policy analysis; state briefs; fast facts; and other resources. Topics include the relationship between weight and diabetes, hypertension, and physical inactivity; the health care costs of obesity; food insecurity, food deserts, and healthy weights; and socioeconomics and obesity.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Barriers, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Data sources, Financing, Health status, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Schools, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Trends, Young children

Growing Food Connections. 2015. Policy database. Buffalo, NY: University of Buffalo, SUNY, Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab,

Annotation: This database is a searchable collection of local public policies that explicitly support community food systems. The database provides examples of local public policies that have been adopted to address a range of food systems issues including rural and urban food production, farmland protection, transfer of development rights, food aggregation and distribution infrastructure, local food purchasing and procurement, healthy food access, food policy councils, food policy coordination, food system metrics, tax reductions and exemptions for food infrastructure. Contents include local laws, ordinances, resolutions, motions, orders, and directives, as well as plans, standards, guidelines, tax exemptions and other public financing policies. Policies span different geographic regions, sizes of government, rural and urban contexts, and public issues. In addition to general information about policy type, topic, and adoption date, the database includes policy documents, or the adopted language for each policy. When available, the database also lists information about the adopting, implementing, and supporting public agencies and non-governmental organizations; funding amount and sources; and policy outcomes.

Keywords: Databases, Financing, Food, Legislation, Local initiatives, Metrics, Nutrition, Policy development, Program coordination, Program planning, Public policy, Service delivery systems

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2015. Sugary drinks in communities of color: Recent research and policy options to reduce consumption. Washington, DC: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 20 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief investigates sugary drink consumption in communities of color, focusing on the public health impact and marketing of such products, and policy options to facilitate healthy beverage consumption. It also discusses how decision makers can work to prevent childhood obesity and related illnesses by advancing policies to reduce the marketing and appeal of sugary drinks—and increase the availability of healthy alternatives—in communities of color.

Contact: Leadership for Healthy Communities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5112 E-mail: info@leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Web Site: http://www.leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Marketing, Minority groups, Minority health, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Sugar

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

Center for Social Inclusion. 2015. Removing barriers to breastfeeding: A structural race analysis of First Food. New York, NY: Center for Social Inclusion, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the barriers to breastfeeding that communities of color face, along with policy and practice recommendations to address racial inequity in First Food. The report highlights structural barriers that women face during pregnancy, at the hospital, and in their first weeks and months at home after the baby is born—including access to Baby-Friendly hospitals and certified lactation consultants.

Contact: Center for Social Inclusion, 150 Broadway, Suite 303, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-2785 E-mail: info@thecsi.org Web Site: http://www.centerforsocialinclusion.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Breastfeeding, Case Studies, Environmental influences, Ethnic groups, Infant health, Mothers, Nutrition, Policy development, Public policy

Merlo C, Brener N, Kann L, McManus T, Harris D, Mugavero K. 2015. School-level practices to increase availability of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and reduce sodium in school meals: United States, 2000, 2006, and 2014. Morbidity and Weekly Report 64(33):905–908,

Annotation: This report examines the prevalence of school-level practices related to implementation of the federal nutrition standards. Contents include an analysis of data from the 2000, 2006, and 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) on school nutrition services practices related to fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and sodium. Opportunities to increase fruit and vegetable availability and reduce sodium content in school meals are also discussed. Topics include ensuring schools have appropriate kitchen equipment; providing training for school nutrition professionals on choosing lower sodium versions of foods, flavoring foods with spices and herbs, preparing fruits and vegetables that are appealing to students, and incorporating whole grain–rich foods into meals; continuing industry efforts to reformulate products to reduce sodium content; and engaging other stakeholders to help increase awareness about and support school meals that meet the nutrition standards.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Nutrition, Policy development, Schools, Standards, Training

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2015. Comprehensive framework for addressing the school nutrition environment and services. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document describes components of the school nutrition environment and resources to support a healthy school nutrition environment. Topics include school meals, smart snacks in school; in-school fundraisers; classroom celebrations, events, and nonfood rewards; access to drinking water; staff role modeling; food and beverage marketing; and healthy eating learning opportunities.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluid intake, Food consumption, Health policy, Health promotion, Learning, Marketing, Models, Nutrition, Policy development, Role models, School health services, Schools, Snacks, Water

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, School Health Branch. 2014. Increasing access to drinking water in schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes key steps that schools can take to meet federal requirements for drinking water during meal periods, as well as to make drinking water available and accessible across the school campus. Topics include conducting a needs assessment of current drinking water policies and practices, developing a school water access plan, implementing the school water access plan, and evaluating the success of the plan. Appendices include a school drinking water needs assessment checklist and planning guide, a diagram of water testing in schools, examples of water dispensers for schools, strategies for overcoming potential challenges, and water access key stakeholder interview questions.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluid intake, Fluorides, Nutrition, Oral health, Policy development, School age children, Schools, Water

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2014. Smart Snacks in School. U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources highlight the Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards. Topics include an overview, regulation and policy, and technical assistance. Contents include a letter from the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture and U.S. Secretary of Education, an infographic, a summary of the standards, issue briefs, a television feature, a presentation, a blog, frequently asked questions, and related resources for schools.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Nutrition, Policy development, Regulations, Resources for professionals, Schools, Standards, Technical assistance

ASCD. 2014. Food stamp cuts: Effects on education. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 4 pp. (ASCD policy points)

Annotation: This policy brief provides information on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the effect of nutrition on student academics, and the status of federal nutrition programs. Contents include links to related resources, an infographic, and tips for policymakers and other stakeholders.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Community action, Federal programs, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Public policy, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. 2014. Increasing access to drinking water and other healthier beverages in early care and education settings. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 43 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about why early childhood programs and child care programs should serve water, rather than soda, fruit drinks, or sports drinks, to young children, and offers suggestion for how to do this. The guide also includes a performance standards checklist for water and other healthy drinks; provides ideas and resources for promoting water and other healthy drinks to children, parents, and staff; and discusses how to create an action plan for reaching healthier beverage goals. A sample letter for parents and information on how to determine whether a drink contains 100 percent fruit juice vs. a lower percentage of fruit juice is included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Early childhood education, Family child care, Fluid intake, Fluorides, Nutrition, Oral health, Policy development, Water, Young children

Smith S, Ekono M, Robbins T. 2014. State policies through a two-generation lens: Strengthening the collective impact of policies that affect the life course of young children and their parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document focuses on state policies that have a collective impact on families and young children. The document describes the strength of collective policy support for children and their parents in states and how states can assess policies that collectively influence the strength of two-generation supports for families with young children. Topics include early care and education, health and nutrition, and parenting and family economic supports. Recommendations are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood education, Families, Family support services, Health policy, Nutrition policy, Parents, Policy analysis, Public policy, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.