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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (62 total).

Clark D. n.d.. Dietary score: Assessment tools and instructions. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health , 20 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a dietary assessment tool used by licensed dietitians for WIC applicants and participants. The tool is divided into four sections, which are: 1) dietary questions, 2) food frequency, 3) nutrition risk assessment, and 4) space for a nutrition care plan. Each section has blank forms and instructions and suggestions.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 Contact Phone: (515) 281-5787 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietitians, Food habits, Forms, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, WIC Program

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2020. Resources for addressing nutrition in the Title V five-year needs assessments: For state MCH Title V programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the role of public health nutrition in Title V maternal and child health programs and ways to engage with public health nutritionists while working on the five-year needs assessment. It gives examples of connections between MCH outcomes and nutrition. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Needs assessment, Nutrition programs, Public health nutrition, Public health nutritionists, Title V programs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2020. Incorporating nutrition in the Title V five-year needs assessments: For public health nutritionists. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of Title V needs assessment and of nutrition and Title V. It gives examples of connections between MCH outcomes and nutrition, and how public health nutritionists can participate. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Needs assessment, Nutrition programs, Public health nutrition, Public health nutritionists, Title V programs

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2016. Preventing childhood obesity in Michigan's classrooms: A collaboration between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and statewide partners. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes Building Healthy Communities, a school-based prevention program in Michigan to help children adopt healthy habits at a young age by providing access to healthy food, health education, physical education, and physical activity. Contents include a description of the program's development and implementation process, outcomes, and next steps. Topics include partnering organization efforts to pool funding, resources, and expertise to engage elementary schools and expand to middle and high schools throughout the state.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Children, Collaboration, Curriculum, Elementary schools, Health behavior, Health promotion, High schools, Michigan, Middle schools, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Obesity, Outcome and process assessment, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, School health education, School health programs, State programs, Statewide planning

Wilson K, Charmchi P, Dworetzky B. 2016. State statutes & regulations on dietary treatment disorders identified through newborn screening. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, 82 pp.

Annotation: This chart provides information about state-specific legislation that mandates the coverage of medically necessary foods by employer-sponsored health insurance, Medicaid, and coverage and related services funded by other state programs such as the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); Title V; or relief funds. Contents include descriptions of medical foods products, abbreviations and definitions, a list of coverage types for dietary treatments of disorders identified through newborn screening, and a list of states that provide phenylketonuria (PKU) only coverage. Details about covered services and any benefit limits or age and income restrictions are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Diet therapy, Dietary assessment, Financing, Food supplements, Genetic disorders, Health insurance, Medicaid, Metabolic diseases, Newborn infants, Newborn screening, Nutrition, Phenylketonuria, Postnatal care, Regulations, Special health care needs, State legislation, State programs, Title V programs, Unfunded mandates, WIC program

National WIC Association. 2016. 2016 NWA WIC research needs to support an effective and efficient WIC program. Washington, DC: National WIC Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the need for focused research on women's health, the impact WIC has on obesity, and improving the quality and use of WIC data. Topics include nutrition education, breastfeeding support, referrals to health and social services, and the healthy food package. The appendices contain descriptions of currently funded research and evaluation projects and ongoing studies.

Contact: National WIC Association, 2001 S Street, N.W., Suite 580, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 232-5492 Fax: (202) 387-5281 E-mail: douglasg@nwica.org Web Site: http://www.nwica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Federal programs, Needs assessment, Nutrition education, Program evaluation, Referrals, Research, WIC program

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2013-. Training tools for healthy schools: Promoting health and academic success. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help schools systematically assess and improve health policies and programs, identify national standards for health and physical education, revise health or physical education curricula, and align with national guidelines to promote healthy eating and physical activity. Contents include a guide for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of health policies and programs and developing an action plan to improve them; analysis tools for revising, selecting, or developing a quality health education or physical education curricula; and guidelines for promoting healthy eating and physical activity. Resources include information for state or local health and education agencies on hosting a workshop for schools or districts.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curriculum development, Health promotion, Nutrition education, Physical education, Policy development, Program improvement, School health education, Schools, Standards, Training

Kleinman RE, ed. 2013. Pediatric nutrition handbook. (7th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1477 pp.

Annotation: This handbook is intended to serve as a ready reference for practicing clinicians on the requirements and metabolism of specific nutrients, methods of assessing nutrition status, and the nutrition support of healthy infants, children, and adolescents, as well as children with acute and chronic illness. Topics that arise frequently in pediatric practice, such as breastfeeding, the impact of diet on long-term health, the use of fast foods and vegetarian diets, food technology and novel foods or ingredients that may become available to consumers, and food labeling are also covered in individual chapters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-816-3.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Child health, Child nutrition, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Food, Food labeling, Food preferences, Infant nutrition, Manuals, Nutrients, Nutrition assessment, Nutritional status, Pediatrics, Technology, Vegetarianism

Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods Project and Health Impact Project. 2012. Health impact assessment: National nutrition standards for snack and a la carte foods and beverages sold in schools. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts, 171 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the relationship between changes in the school food environment and children’s health outcomes. Topics include the potential impact on students' health of national nutrition standards for competitive foods or foods sold in schools individually as snacks, a la carte items, and beverages; school services; and diet and nutrition. The report also presents policy recommendations and promising practices.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, Health Impact Project, 901 E Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 540-6012 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: healthimpactproject@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.healthimpactproject.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Health status, Nutrition policy, Oral health, School age children, Schools, Standards

National Center for Environmental Health. 2012. Second national report on biochemical indicators of diet and nutrition in the U.S. population. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Environmental Health, 484 pp.

Annotation: This report provides data and analysis in an ongoing assessment of the U.S. population’s nutritional status by measuring blood or urine concentrations of 58 diet-and-nutrition biochemical indicators. The measurements of the 58 indicators give researchers and others information about population dietary intake or environmental exposure. Report contents include background on the study, addressing data needs, public health uses, data presented for each biochemical indicator, interpreting the data, useful sources of information about using nutrition, monitoring to interpret data, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), data analysis, and references. Biomedical indicators in this report include biochemical indicator sections, new biochemical indicators: water-soluble vitamins, vitamin B6, fat-soluble vitamins and nutrients, vitamin C, trace elements (iron indicators and iodine), fatty acids, isoflavones and lignans, iron status: transferrin receptor and body iron, acrylamide hemoglobin adducts, and acrylamide hemoglobin adducts.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Dietary assessment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, National surveys, Nutrition, Population surveillance

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Let's Move, and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2011-. Choose My Plate. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion,

Annotation: This website prompts consumers to think about building healthy plates at mealtimes and to seek more information to help them do that. Features include the MyPlate icon, which serves as the federal government's primary food group symbol. The website also provides professional and consumer information, resources, and tools for dietary assessment, nutrition education, and other nutrition information based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Content is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Information sources, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Program coordination, Public policy, Spanish language materials

Healthy Kids, Healthy Future Partnership. 2011. Let's Move Child Care checklist: Recommendations for preschoolers, infants and toddlers. [Jacksonville, FL]: Nemours Foundation, 19 pp.

Annotation: This checklist presents recommendations for health promotion and obesity prevention in early care and education. The checklist is based on the Nutrition and Physical Self-Assessment for Child Care program, a research-tested intervention designed to enhance policies, practices, and environments in child care by improving the nutritional quality of food served, the amount and quality of physical activity, staff-child interactions, and facility nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and related environmental characteristics. Contents of the checklist include recommendations for physical activity, screen time, food, beverages, and infant feeding. Options for assessing provisions, environment, provider behaviors, parent and provider education, and policy are included.

Contact: Healthy Kids, Healthy Future, Nemours Foundation, 10140 Centurion Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Fax: (904) 697-4220 Web Site: https://www.healthykidshealthyfuture.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child care, Health promotion, Nutrition education, Nutrition policy, Physical activity, Young children

Washington State Department of Health. 2010. Nutrition interventions for children with special health care needs (3rd ed.). Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, 425 pp.

Annotation: This book is a resource for those involved in the monitoring or delivery of nutrition care for children with special health care needs. It is intended to serve as a framework for developing and providing nutrition screening, assessment, and intervention as routine components of comprehensive health care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses. The book is divided into three sections: (1) determination of nutrition status, (2) problem-based nutrition interventions, and (3) condition-specific nutrition interventions. The book includes numerous appendices, including sample screening forms, growth charts for children with a variety of different special health care needs, and other tools. New chapters included in the third edition include breastfeeding, physical acitivity, and autism spectrum disorders.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DOH Pub. No. 961-158.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Dietary assessment, Forms, Growth charts, Intervention, Nutrition, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, Screening, Washington

Stallings VA, Suitor CW, Taylor CL, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. 2010. School meals: Building blocks for healthy children. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on revising its standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. The recommendations are based on a review and assessment of Dietary Reference Intakes (a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine) and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (jointly prepared by the USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The eight recommendations in the report update the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) nutrition standards and meal requirements approved in 1995; shift the focus toward meeting recommendations in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines; emphasize the need for effective implementation; and identify key research topics. The recommendations encompass standards for menu planning and standards for meals as selected by the student (in contrast to those that are simply offered to students). Seventeen appendixes include sample menus, data tales, definitions, and comparisons between the existing guidelines and proposed revisions for school meal preparation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Data, Dietary guidelines, Federal programs, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School food services, School lunch programs

Decker J, Clarke GA, Farias S, Kallio J, Bell L, Gabor V, Anthony, J. 2009. Participant-centered nutrition education toolkit. Washington, DC: Altarum Institute,

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to assist states with the assessment of participant-centered nutrition education (PCE) readiness and to provide guidance and resources for planning and implementing the PCE model. The PCE model is an approach to helping individuals adopt positive nutrition- and health-related behaviors. The toolkit includes a detailed description of the PCE model, assessment tools, a training video, a resource guide, and two literature reviews.

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Health, Health behavior, Nutrition, Prevention, Resource materials, Sate programs, Training, WIC program

Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, Stallings VA, Yaktine AL, eds. 2007. Nutrition standards for foods in schools: Leading the way toward healthier youth. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 282 pp.

Annotation: This book offers reviews and recommendations about appropriate nutrition standards and guidance for the sale, content, and consumption of foods and beverages at school, with attention given to foods and beverages offered in competition with federally reimbursable meals and snacks. Topics include nutrition-related health concerns, dietary intakes, eating behaviors in children and adolescents, the school environment, and food and beverages sold outside the school meal program. Additional topics include federal, state, local, and industry initiatives; recommended standards and actions for competitive foods in schools and next steps. References are provided as well as appendices including acronyms and a glossary; energy requirements; nutrition standards for competitive foods sold in elementary, middle, or high school set by states; additional guidelines, open sessions at a workshop on nutrition standards for schools, and biographical sketches of members of the authoring committee. An index concludes the book.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-10383-1.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Elementary schools, High schools, Junior high schools, Nutrition assessment, School food services, School lunch programs, Standards

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.