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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

Hitti JE, Melvin AJ, Taylor P, Rhodes W, eds. 2016. Screening and management of maternal HIV infection: Implications for mother and infant (rev. ed.). Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Northwest Regional Perinatal Program and Department of Pediatrics; Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: This handbook describes best practices to help with the continuing effort to prevent HIV infection in women and infants. Topics include HIV counseling and testing during pregnancy; perinatal transmission risk; diagnostic tests; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's classification of disease; HIV reporting requirements; medications and treatment during pregnancy, labor, delivery and postpartum; newborn treatment; and consultation and referral information. Four appendices provide a resource directory, a listing of local health jurisdictions in Washington state, free regional and national telephone consultation resources, and Web sites. References conclude the handbook.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Consultation, Counseling, Diagnostic tests, HIV, HIV screening, Labor, Medicine, Newborns, Perinatal care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Referral, Resource materials, Women's health

National Children's Study. 2014. Vanguard Study recruitment overview. Bethesda, MD: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 4 pp. (The National Children's Study data brief; no. 1)

Annotation: This data brief provides information on the three phases of recruitment for the Vanguard Study, the pilot of the National Children's Study. The phases include the Initial Vanguard Study, the Alternate Recruitment Sub-study, and the Provider-Based Sampling Sub-Study. Contents include data on the number of locations, women eligible for screening, women screened and determined as study eligible, and newborns enrolled by recruitment strategy.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Enrollment, Environmental exposure, Health status, Newborns, Research, Women

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Strategies for states and health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources, from a webinar held on July 16, 2014, highlight strategies for preventing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Contents include a recording of the speaker's presentations (1 hour, 27 min., 23 sec.), the webinar agenda and speaker biographies, and related materials. Topics include recent trends in opioid abuse and NAS, with an overview of federally-led prevention efforts; the impact of rising NAS rates across the states, including implications for Medicaid and examples of state-level action; a health plan-led initiative to improve care coordination and social support for pregnant women in treatment for addiction; and the latest in NAS treatment, and an assessment of where public and private investments would be most beneficial.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Drug effects, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Model programs, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborns, Opiates, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment

Taylor P, Bailey D, Green SR, McCully C, eds. 2012. Substance abuse during pregnancy: Guidelines for screening (rev. ed.). Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This booklet describes the role of health professionals in screening and identifying pregnant women with substance abuse issues. Contents include guidelines for screening and follow-up, sample screening tools, recommendations related to drug testing of pregnant women and newborns, and referral resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Health Education Resource Exchange, Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47833, Olympia, WA 98504-7833, Telephone: (360) 236-3736 Fax: (360) 664-4500 E-mail: here@doh.wa.gov Web Site: http://here.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Newborns, Pregnant women, Screening, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Tests

First Candle. 2006. Sample policy and procedures: Safe sleep practices for the well baby nursery. [Baltimore, MD]: First Candle, 6 pp. (Model behavior)

Annotation: This booklet developed as part of the campaign titled Model Behavior: The most important modeling job of your life, whose ultimate goal to ensure that every parent leaving a hospital is aware of and prepared to adopt safe sleep messages. Topics include sleep position, bedding/soft materials,, bedsharing, swaddling or bundling, smoking, and pacifier use. The booklet includes practices for the well baby unit (WBU) and tips for WBU parent education.

Contact: CJ First Candle, 49 Locust Avenue, Suite 104, New Canaan, CT 06840, Telephone: (800) 221-7437 E-mail: alison@cjfirstcandle.org Web Site: http://cjfirstcandle.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Hospitals, Infant health, Newborns, Parenting skills, Prevention, Resources for professionals, SIDS

Inland Empire Breastfeeding Coalition and Inland Counties Regional Perinatal Program. 2005. Providing breastfeeding support: Model hospital policy recommendations. (3rd ed.). Sacramento, CA: California Department of Health Services, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides model hospital hospital recommendations for providing breastfeeding support to new mothers. The paper includes a list of ten policy recommendations that are designed to give basic information and guidance to perinatal professionals who wish to revise policies that affect breastfeeding mothers. Following the list is an expanded explanation of each recommendation, including information on intervention and management, rationales, and references.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Guidelines, Hospitals, Infant health, Newborns, Nutrition policy

Ray K., Farley MS, Gray WT, Johnson G, Ray RD. 1997. Comprehensive services for HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns: Seven case studies. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies and discusses successful HIV program grantees that provide services to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Researchers have used a case study method to focus on programs that have in common coordinated, comprehensive, and quality patient care. These case studies identify models of effective care delivery and program components that could be replicated or adapted to other locations. References and the case study protocol are included at the end of the report.

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries. Document Number: 99-0056-P.

Keywords: Barriers, Case management, Case studies, Community based services, Comprehensive care, Data collection, Early intervention, Evaluation, Family centered care, HIV infected patients, Health services delivery, High risk infants, High risk pregnancy, Interviews, Model programs, Multidisciplinary teams, Newborns

Newman T. 1992. Laboratory Evaluation of Jaundiced Newborns A Reevaluation [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, 35 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to evaluate the validity of the standard textbook recommendations for the clinical laboratory approach to the diagnosis of jaundice in newborn infants. Since standards of care are based on traditional recommendations, the study looked at the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of each of the routine laboratory tests recommended for the evaluation of jaundiced infants. The study was retrospective and utilized several data bases, supplemented with chart reviews. The results showed that the prevalence of unsuspected significant illness in jaundiced infants is low, and the available laboratory tests have low sensitivity and specificity. The authors concluded that most routine laboratory tests in jaundiced infants are seldom useful. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-179992.

Keywords: Blood tests, Hyperbilirubinemia, Infant screening, Jaundice, Newborns

Guillermo T. 1991 (ca.). Hepatitis B Screening Access for Southeast Asians [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: Asian American Health Forum, 16 pp.

Annotation: Although the U.S. Public Health Service provides for hepatitis B surface antigen screening for pregnant women who are refugees, there is concern among many providers of care to the Asian American community that those eligible for these programs are not aware of or do not have access to the facilities that provide the appropriate care. In addition to the accessibility problem, the large majority of Southeast Asians must also deal with linguistic/cultural, structural, educational, and financial barriers which prevent them from receiving appropriate care. This project addressed these and other issues facing this population. All of the sites participating in this project were chosen for their experience and sensitivity in addressing the special needs of this community. The project's goal was to increase access to hepatitis B screening and immunization for Southeast Asian pregnant women and their newborns. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-182902.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Barriers to Health Care, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Hepatitis B, Immigrants, Immunization, Minorities, Newborns, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Screening, Southeast Asians

McCabe E. 1991. Sickle Cell Anemia: DNA for Newborn Screening Followup [Final report]. Los Angeles, CA: Baylor College of Medicine, 28 pp.

Annotation: The objective of this study was to demonstrate the applicability of DNA techniques to newborn screening for sickle cell disease. The current practice in Texas was universal neonatal screening; small samples of blood were dried on filter paper and analyzed by protein electrophoresis. The primary aim of this project was to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of sickle cell disease by DNA genotyping directly from the original newborn screening filter paper. The purported advantages of this approach included earlier, more definitive notification of families with affected neonates. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-135813.

Keywords: Laboratories, Neonatal screening, Newborns, Sickle cell disease, Tests

Pass K. 1989. Pilot Screening for Biotinidase Deficiency in Newborns [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, 37 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this study was to evaluate screening for biotinidase deficiency for incorporation into the panel of newborn screening tests in New York State. It was recommended that Biotinidase deficiency demonstrates many of the requisites for inclusion in a newborn screening program for reasons including the assay is suitable for high-volume screening; the rate of false positives is low; no false negatives were identified; the frequency of biotinidase deficiency is within the frequency range of disorders in current screening programs; cases of biotinidase deficiency were identified in the three largest ethnic categories of the population; treatment and followup are simple, inexpensive, and effective; early intervention can prevent irreversible clinical sequelae which would otherwise lead to lifetime disability or early death. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB89-230817.

Keywords: Biotinidase Deficiency, Colorimetric Testing, Hypothyroidism, Metabolic Disorders, Neonatal Screening, Newborns, Phenylketonuria (PKU)

Pass K. 1987. Retrospective Study of Hemoglobin Variants in Newborns [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health,

Annotation: It was the purpose of this study to examine a group of infants identified in the Newborn Screening Program with a variant type of hemoglobin. Through correlation of initial test results, repeat hemoglobin analysis, and medical histories of the first year of life, conclusions regarding the effect of these hemoglobin variants on the child's health were made. Analysis of the data then allowed recommendations regarding appropriate followup procedures for these newborns. In no case could a linkage between the hemoglobin variant and any medical events of the first year be established. These results suggested that even though newborn screening may not definitively identify all variant hemoglobins, those types which are grouped in the broad class "variant" result in no significant medical sequelae for those infants. Accordingly, no recommendation for changes in the newborn followup procedure for this group of newborns was deemed necessary. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB88-173661.

Keywords: Infants, Neonatal screening, Newborns, Sickle cell disease

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.