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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (160 total).

New York State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center. n.d.. Childbirth education toolkit. Albany, NY; New York State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center,

Annotation: This toolkit is for midwives, doulas, and other childbirth educators to introduce newborn screening into midwifery practices and into nontraditional settings including childbirth education classes. Brochures, videos, and other educational materials are provided for the states of New York, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Links to resources for national audiences are provided from the March of Dimes, the Health Services and Resources Administration, Genetic Alliance, and the Save Babies Through Screening Foundation. Materials are available in English and Spanish, with items from Pennsylvania available in Chinese, French, Portuguese, Vietnamese, and Russian.

Contact: Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, NYS Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509, Telephone: (518) 474-2160 Web Site: http://www.wadsworth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth education, Educational materials, Genetic screening, Midwifery, Midwives, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Spanish language materials

Kilpatrick SJ, Papile LA, Macones GA eds. 2017. Guidelines for perinatal care (8th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 691 pp.

Annotation: This guide for personnel involved in the care of pregnant women, their fetuses, and their neonates in community programs, hospitals, and medical centers provides information on obstetric and neonatal care. Topics include the organization of perinatal health care, inpatient perinatal care services, quality improvement and patient safety, maternal and neonatal interhospital transfer, preconception and antepartum care, intrapartum and postpartum care, obstetric and medical complications, care of the newborn, neonatal complications and management of high-risk infants, perinatal infections, and infection control. The guide is a companion document to Guidelines for Women's Health Care.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Guidelines, Infant health, Infection control, Maternal health, Newborn infants, Patient care management, Perinatal care, Postpartum care, Prenatal care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Safety

Meek JY, ed. 2017. New mother's guide to breastfeeding (3rd ed.). Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 304 pp.

Annotation: This handbook answers common questions about breastfeeding. The handbook discusses the choice to breastfeed; explains how breastfeeding works; and provides information about getting ready for a newborn, first feedings, special situations, going home, nutrition, common problems, breastfeeding beyond infancy, separations from the infant, the father's role, and weaning.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $15, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-160-9.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Consumer education materials, Fathers, Infant feeding, Infants, Mothers, Newborn infants, Nutrition, Weaning, Young children

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Lai YH, Karp C, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp. (brief 3 pp.).

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Ko HY, Patrick SW, Tong VT, Patel R, Lind JN, Barfield WD. 2016. Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome: 28 states, 1999–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802,

Annotation: This report examines state trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) incidence using all-payer, hospital inpatient delivery discharges compiled in the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) during 1999–2013. The findings underscore the importance of state-based public health programs to prevent unnecessary opioid use and to treat substance use disorders during pregnancy, as well as decrease the incidence of NAS.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Measures, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Pregnant women, State programs, Statistical data, Substance use disorders, Trends

Wilson K, Charmchi P, Dworetzky B. 2016. State statutes & regulations on dietary treatment disorders identified through newborn screening. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, 82 pp.

Annotation: This chart provides information about state-specific legislation that mandates the coverage of medically necessary foods by employer-sponsored health insurance, Medicaid, and coverage and related services funded by other state programs such as the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); Title V; or relief funds. Contents include descriptions of medical foods products, abbreviations and definitions, a list of coverage types for dietary treatments of disorders identified through newborn screening, and a list of states that provide phenylketonuria (PKU) only coverage. Details about covered services and any benefit limits or age and income restrictions are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Diet therapy, Dietary assessment, Financing, Food supplements, Genetic disorders, Health insurance, Medicaid, Metabolic diseases, Newborn infants, Newborn screening, Nutrition, Phenylketonuria, Postnatal care, Regulations, Special health care needs, State legislation, State programs, Title V programs, Unfunded mandates, WIC program

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2015. Prenatal drug use and newborn health: Federal efforts need better planning and coordination. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office,

Annotation: This report provides information on how federal agencies have addressed opioid use by pregnant women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Topics include federally funded research, federal programs, and other federal agency efforts related to prenatal opioid use or NAS; gaps identified by federal agency officials and experts in efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS; and how federal efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS are planned and coordinated.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Federal agencies, Infant health, Newborn infants, Prenatal influences, Prevention, Program coordination, Program development, Program planning, Referrals, Research, Screening, Substance use

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Reducing neonatal abstinence syndrome in Tennessee. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights partnerships to address the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) epidemic in Tennessee. Topics include efforts to expand a community-based program to assist mothers with substance abuse problems and ensure a drug-free and safe home for their newborns; provide start-up costs for a regional detox center for women addicted to prescription drugs; research the effectiveness of detox from opiate drugs during pregnancy, and the long-term effect of detox treatment on NAS rates in the state; and establish a hospital-based NAS treatment process.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Drug use during pregnancy, Financing, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention program, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment, Tennessee

National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs. 2014–. Quality improvement toolkits. [Washington, DC]: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, mutliple items.

Annotation: These toolkits provide resources for improving the quality of maternity care. Contents include resources for implementing evidence-based quality improvement strategies in hospitals, birth centers, clinician practices, and the broader health care system. Topics include achieving specific National Quality Forum-endorsed measures, neonatal care, and breastfeeding. Patient safety, patient- and family-centered care, and consumer outreach and engagement toolkits that can be applied to maternity care are also included.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Newborn infants, Outreach, Participation, Patient care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Safety

Ramakrishnan M. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: How states can help advance the knowledge base for primary prevention and best practices of care. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes opportunities to avert or ameliorate the outcome of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) along a continuum of care spanning timeframes in the mother's and infant's life and the role of state health agencies. Topics include surveillance for NAS-affected infants and the sources of maternal opiate use; reimbursement for using screening protocols to detect substance abuse early in pregnancy and withdrawal signs in newborns; development of measures to ensure follow-up with opioid-dependent women and receipt of comprehensive services; and collaborative efforts to strengthen clinical standards for identification, management, and follow-up with NAS-affected infants and their families. A state index of resources is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Intervention, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal addiction, Newborn infants, Opiates, Population surveillance, Primary prevention, Screening, State health agencies, Substance use

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Improving newborn screening processes. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 1 p.

World Health Organization, United National Children's Fund. 2014. Every newborn: An action plan to end preventable deaths. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, 55 pp.

Annotation: This action plan is based on epidemiology, evidence, and global and country learning, setting a framework to end preventable newborn deaths and stillbirths by 2035. Topics include information on existing commitments, rights, and the current situation; effective interventions for improving the health of newborns across the continuum of care; vision and goals; strategic objectives and principles; impact framework, coverage targets, measures of success, milestones, and core indicators; research priorities and coordination; and actions by constituency. A summary of the action plan process is included. The executive summary is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Contact: Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, World Health Organization, 20 avenue Appia, CH-1211, Geneva, Switzerland Telephone: +41 22 791 2595 Fax: +41 22 791 5854 E-mail: pmnch@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/pmnch/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Early intervention, Fetal death, Health objectives, International health, Models, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Primary prevention

Association of Public Health Laboratories. (2013). Newborn screening: Four facts policymakers need to know. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 14 pp.

Annotation: This bochure describes the importance of newborn screening in the early detection of heritable and genetic conditions that may otherwise be hidden in infancy or early childhood. It outlines the history of newborn screening in the United States in the past 50 years, the importance of blood-spot samples from every newborn being screened by a laboratory, the public health success of newborn screening, the economic benefits of early detection of conditions, the success of pre-discharge hearing and heart screening, and the importance of evolving and improving newborn screening. The brochure contains tables describing the most common disorders screened for and partners in the screening process. It also provides several vignettes of people who were diagnosed with various conditions and were able to lead healthy lives because their conditions could be treated if diagnosed early.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood tests, Genetic screening, Hearing tests, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Screening tests

Association of Public Health Laboratories. (2013). What's the best thing you can do to protect your newborn's health?: Newborn screening, 50 years - saving babies' lives. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure explains the importance of newborn screening for new parents. It discusses national and state testing practices so that parents will know early about potential life threatening illnesses or disabilities to their baby.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Screening tests

Georgia Department of Public Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health Section. 2013. Recommended guidelines for perinatal care in Georgia (rev.). Atlanta, GA: Georgia Department of Public Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health Section, 56 pp.

Annotation: This document provides standard-of-practice recommendations for perinatal health care professionals in Georgia. It is also intended to be a blueprint for the State Perinatal Health Care System, a system to improve the quality of reproductive health care for women and perinatal health care for pregnant women and infants. Topics include strategy for action, preconception and interconception health care, antepartum care, intrapartum care, postpartum care, and perinatal infection.

Contact: Georgia Department of Public Health, Two Peachtree Street, N.W., 15th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30303-3186, Telephone: (404) 657-2700 Web Site: http://dph.georgia.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consultation, Georgia, Guidelines, Health care systems, Hospitals, Infant health, Infection control, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Perinatal services, Postpartum care, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Women's health

Truven Health Analytics. 2013. The cost of having a baby in the United States. New York, NY: Childbirth Connection, 84 pp., exec. summ. (5 pp.).

Annotation: This study examines and compares payments made to hospitals, clinicians, and other service providers for maternal and newborn care, including the costs associated with specific services according to source of payment. The study analyzes charges and payments made in states across the country and presents average costs for cesarian and vaginal births, neonatal intensive care services, and costs associated with laboratory, pharmacy, radiology, anesthesiology, and other services. Included are detailed comparisons of costs based on the source of payment (whether Medicaid, an employee-sponsored commercial insurer, a second insurer such as a union, or out-of-pocket) and the amounts billed, the amounts approved, and the amounts paid by individuals. Key findings are summarized in tables, which include data from selected states. Also provided are lists of top medical diagnoses of newborns admitted to Neonatal Care Units.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Comparative analysis, Costs, Health care costs, Hospitalization, Maternal health services, Neonatal intensive care, Newborn infants, Research, Statistics

Figlio DN, Guryan J, Karbownik K, Roth J. 2013. The effects of poor neonatal health on children's cognitive development. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 55 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18846)

Annotation: This paper discusses the results of a study on children born in Florida from 1992 to 2002, and the effect of birth weight on cognitive development from kindergarten through middle school. Study methodology is reviewed and results are discussed in the following categories: heavier versus lighter twins; testing; results by grade; differences by genetics, gender, maternal race, ethnicity and immigrant status; and family socioeconomic status. Topics also include birth weight discordance, school quality and the effect of birth weight on test scores, and birth weight gaps at kindergarten entry. A bibliography and statistical data conclude the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Florida, Learning, Low birthweight, Newborn infants, School readiness, State surveys, Statistical data, Young children

National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality . 2013. Becoming baby-friendly: Improving breastfeeding support in US hospitals. [Boston, MA]: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality, 1 video (16 min., 47 sec.).

Annotation: This video presents the stories of four hospitals as they journey toward Baby-Friendly status. The video was produced as part of the Best Fed Beginnings quality-improvement project, a nationwide effort to help hospitals improve maternity care and increase the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the United States. The video features the Barnes-Jewish Hospital's (Missouri) work on patient-centered care, the Presbyterian Hospital's (New Mexico) efforts to increase skin-to-skin contact, the Christiana Hospital's (Delaware) focus on staff buy-in, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital's efforts to catalyze the community by changing misconceptions about breastfeeding.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communities, Hospital programs, Infant health, Newborn infants, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Women's health

Save the Children. 2013. Surviving the first day: State of the world's mothers 2013. Westport, CT: Save the Children, annual.

Annotation: This report looks at the first days of life, when mothers and newborns face threats to survival, and highlights approaches that are working to bring essential heath care to hard-to-reach places where most deaths occur. The report also demonstrates how more lives can be saved with additional funding. Topic include progress over the past two decades, why newborns die, the most dangerous places to be born, the continuum of care for mothers and newborns, funding and need, and how to take action.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, Financing, Health care, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Infant death, Infant mortality, International health, Newborn infants, Poverty, Prevention programs, Rural population, Trends

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.