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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (65 total).

University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability. 2019. Online course: Improving the oral health of pregnant women, children, and families. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability,

Annotation: This course for community health workers includes six modules about improving the oral health of pregnant women, children, and families: (1) oral health essentials, (2) oral health screening, (3) oral health during pregnancy, (4) oral health knowledge and skills for infants and young children, (5) planning and making changes for good family oral health, and (6) advocacy for oral health for mothers and infants. The course has been approved for continuing education units and medical education units for community health workers and representatives by the New Mexico Department of Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 2300 Menaul Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87107, Telephone: (505) 272-3000 Fax: (505) 272-5280 Web Site: http://cdd.unm.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Continuing education, Infants, New Mexico, Oral health, Pregnant women, Professional education, State programs, Young children

New Mexico Perinatal Oral Health Quality Improvement Project. 2018. New Mexico Perinatal Oral Health Quality Improvement Project: Resource and implementation manual (version 2.1). Albuquerque, NM: New Mexico Perinatal Oral Health Quality Improvement Project, 93 pp.

Annotation: This manual focuses on increasing oral health services in primary care and prenatal care settings in New Mexico. The manual is divided into seven sections: (1) introduction and overview; (2) conducting an oral health screening; (3) conducting an oral health assessment; (4) patient self-management, goal setting, and educational materials; (5) treatment recommendations; (6) referring patients to a dentist; and (7) the American Academy of Pediatrics oral health coding fact sheet for primary care health professionals and the Primary Care Oral Health Assessment Tool, with billing codes included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 2300 Menaul Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87107, Telephone: (505) 272-3000 Fax: (505) 272-5280 Web Site: http://cdd.unm.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Manuals, New Mexico, Oral health, Pregnant women, Primary care, State programs

Martin AB, Probst JC, Jones KM. 2017. Improving rural oral health: Six states’ response to the United States Department of Health and Human Services oral health strategic framework. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 15 pp. (Findings brief)

Annotation: This brief explores how six states from different regions of the country (Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina) have responded to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Oral Health Strategic Framework. For each state, background information is provided, along with a summary of how the state is improving access to oral health care and advancing oral health interprofessional practice.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Service Integration, South Carolina, State programs

New Mexico Department of Health. 2016. FY_: Strategic plan. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, annual.

Annotation: This document outlines a strategic plan to improve population health outcomes of New Mexico residents through an engaged, empowered, and high-performing health work force and simple and effective processes that support health status improvement. Topics include mission and vision; guiding principles; strategic planning process and membership; external trends, events, and other factors affecting the work; strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges; results, priorities, and indicators; and results-based accountability and strategy execution. Strategies and actions include promoting access to person- and community-centered health and wellness by aligning and integrating public health, behavioral health, oral health, and primary care.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Fiscal management, Health care systems, Health promotion, Health status, New Mexico, Outcome and process assessment, Program improvement, Public health agencies, Quality assurance, State programs, Strategic plans, Work force, Work force

New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention. 2015. New Mexico: Sexual violence free–A statewide strategic plan for the primary prevention of sexual violence 2015–2020. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention, 66 pp.

Annotation: This document for agencies, organizations, universities, community coalitions, policymakers, prevention professionals, and other individuals interested in reducing the burden of sexual violence in New Mexico provides a framework for moving primary prevention forward. Contents include background on sexual violence and active consent, the causes and costs of sexual violence and how to prevent it, societal factors that contribute to sexual assault, priority populations, the system for responding to sexual violence in New Mexico, and a summary of progress. Methods, results, focus groups with a subset of priority populations, conclusion, and goals and objectives are included.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Ethnic groups, Injury prevention, Minority groups, New Mexico, Primary prevention, Risk factors, Rural populations, Sexual assault, Strategic plans, Violence prevention, Women

New Mexico Executive Office. 2015. Proclamation: Children's oral health month. Santa Fe, New Mexico: State of New Mexico Executive Office, 1 p.

Annotation: This document proclaims February as Children's Oral Health Month in New Mexico. Contents include information about the impact of untreated tooth decay in children, disparities in oral health, and efforts to increase awareness of the importance of oral health.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-0837 Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Low income groups, New Mexico, Oral health, Public awareness materials

Hossain M, Coughlin R, Zickafoose J. 2014. CHIPRA quality demonstration states help school-based health centers strengthen their medical home features. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp. (National evaluation of the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant Program: Evaluation highlight no. 8)

Annotation: This document is the eighth in a series that presents descriptive and analytic findings from the national evaluation of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant Program. The document focuses on a joint CHIPRA quality demonstration project in Colorado and New Mexico in which the quality improvement goals include integrating the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach into school-based health centers (SBHCs). The document describes what motivated the states and SBHCs to adopt the PCMH approach, actions they are taking to strengthen SBHCs' medical home features, changes in the states' health care policies that are relevant to SBHCs being recognized as PCMHs, and what other states can do if they are interested in supporting SBHCs in their efforts to become medical homes.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Colorado, Demonstration programs, Medical home, New Mexico, Policy development, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, State programs

New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Policy and Accountability. (2013). New Mexico state health assessment: 2014-2016. [Santa Fe, NM]: New Mexico Department of Health, ca. 180 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes information and processes used to assess the heath of New Mexico’s population and how the information is used in work with communities to develop priorities and plans of action to improve health. Contents include New Mexico demographics; the health system in the state; core documents with state health assessment information; topic specific health planning assessments; community health councils, assessments and health improvement plans; community transformation grant assessment; other assessments related to system improvement; the Community Health Improvement Plan, and future issues. References and appendices are included.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health services, Health care systems, Needs assessment, New Mexico, Public health, State surveys

New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, Creative Media Institute. (2013). Ensuring child safety: A three-part video series for law enforcement personnel. Las Cruces, NM: New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, 3 videos.

Annotation: These three videorecordings, about 15-20 minutes each, help train law enforcement officers in New Mexico about child safety in traumatic situations involving abuse or neglect of children, and provides tips and procedures in minimizing trauma for children. Video topics include: (1) parental arrest, (2) abuse and neglect referrals, and (3) minimizing trauma.

Contact: Southwest Region-National Child Protection Training Center, New Mexico State University, PO Box 30003, MSC3470, Las Cruces, NM 88003, E-mail: sbucher@nmsu.edu Web Site: http://swrtc.nmsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child safety, Child welfare, Children, Law enforcement, New Mexico, Professional training, Trauma

Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy. (2013). Reporting child abuse and neglect: An e-learning for school personnel and health providers. Las Cruces, NM: Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy,

Annotation: This online training course addresses the requirement for all school personnel to complete a training in the detection and reporting of child abuse or neglect and serves as a refresher for experienced educators as well. The training covers mandated reporting in the state of New Mexico, warning signs and indicators of child abuse and neglect, and directions on filing a report Scenarios shown as videos, interactive activities, and quizzes are included in the online course.

Contact: Southwest Region-National Child Protection Training Center, New Mexico State University, PO Box 30003, MSC3470, Las Cruces, NM 88003, E-mail: sbucher@nmsu.edu Web Site: http://swrtc.nmsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, New Mexico, Professional training, School personnel, State initiatives, Training materials

Courtot B, Coughlin TA, Lawton E. 2013. Medicaid and CHIP managed care payment methods and spending in 20 states: Final report to the Office of Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is a companion to the Medicaid and CHIP Risk-Based Managed Care in 20 States report, focuses on 20 states' Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care payment methods and spending. The states are Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The report addresses two research questions: (1) how do the 20 states establish capitation rates in their Medicaid and CHIP managed care programs, and how have their approaches to and policies for rate setting changed over the past decade and (2) how does monthly Medicaid spending for four distinct managed care enrollee populations (adults and children, with and without disabilities) vary among the 20 states? The report introduces the issues and presents the study approach, methods, findings, and a discussion.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Arizona, California, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Connecticut, Costs, Delaware, Disabilities, Florida, Managed care, Maryland, Massachusetts, Medicaid, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, State programs, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin

Martin AB, Torres M, Vyavaharkar M, Chen Z, Towne S, Probst JC. 2013. Rural border health chartbook. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the health status of and health care use among people residing on the U.S. side of the entire U.S.-Mexico border. Topics include geographic and ethnic disparities among U.S. border residents and select indicators related to access to care, women's preventive services, oral health, infectious and communicable diseases, and mental health warranting programmatic and policy interventions. Contents include issues among residents in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas, including comparison of indicators by ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic), rurality (rural vs. urban), and proximity to border (border vs. non-border). Data cover the period 2005–2009.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, California, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, Health disparities, Health status, New Mexico, Rural populations, State surveys, Texas

Ray JM. 2012. Children's oral health in New Mexico: Lessons from the southwest. Washington, DC: First Focus, 16 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the state of oral health care for children in New Mexico. Topics include statewide efforts to improve oral health care; challenges to ensuring that all children have access to high-quality, comprehensive oral health care; best practices; and policy recommendations.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental care, Health care utilization, New Mexico, Oral health, State initiatives

New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Policy and Accountability. 2012. Racial and ethnic health disparities report card (7th ed.). [Santa Fe, NM]: New Mexico Department of Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report surveys and describes the differences in trends of health status and impact of diseases on the different race and ethnic populations in New Mexico. It addresses many of the key health issues of concern including deaths, as well as disparities in the burden of chronic disease. Topics also include mother and child health, chronic diseases, infectious diseases, violence and injury, risk behaviors, and changes in disparities.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Chronic disease, Disease, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Injuries, Maternal health, New Mexico, Public health, State surveys, Trends, Violence

New Mexico Department of Health. 2012. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System: Surveillance report–Birth years 2009-2010. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, 109 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey to assess the health of mothers and infants in New Mexico. Topics include preconception health, social determinants, health behaviors, health services, prenatal and maternity care, postpartum care, and neonatal health and infant care. Trend data is provided for certain indicators. Where possible, each topic also includes a Healthy People 2020 goal for comparing state estimates to national targets. The appendix includes the survey, methodology and details for the sample, survey responses, data weighting, and definitions or coding for reported variables. A query module is also available.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status, Infant health, New Mexico, Population surveillance, Pregnancy, Risk assessment, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends, Women's health

New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department. [2011]. Home visiting service manual. [Santa Fe, NM]: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 138 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the underlying research-based philosopy and defines practice parameters, standards, and reporting activities for all home visiting programs funded through New Mexico's Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD). The manual also provides an overview of CYFD home visiting programs, defines home visiting, and discusses the target population, eligibility criteria, service and evaluation components, staffing requirements, safety and risk reduction, staff supervision, service requirements and core components, and documentation and file maintenance. This manual also includes the Home Visiting Database Manual v2.

Contact: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 2300 Menaul Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87107, Telephone: (505) 272-3000 Fax: (505) 272-5280 Web Site: http://cdd.unm.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: State programs, Eligibility, Evaluation, Families, Home visiting, Infants, New Mexico, Safety, Service delivery, Staff, Supervision, Young children

New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department. [2011]. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: New Mexico's statewide needs assessment. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department, 20 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This statewide needs assessment describes the healthcare needs of New Mexico's maternal and child health populations; the programs in place to address those needs; and the ways in which those programs can be improved. Included is an overview of the state's demographics and comparative health rankings and a presentation of data findings at the county, community, and state levels. A detailed description of New Mexico's home visiting programs is provided together with a plan to build a home visiting system of care during the three year period from 2009-2012.

Contact: New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department, P.O. Drawer 5160, Santa Fe, NM 87502-5160, Telephone: (800) 660-0793 Web Site: http://www.cyfd.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care reform, Home visiting, Needs assessment, New Mexico, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State MCH programs, State surveys

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2011. School health programs: Improving the health of our nation's youth—At a glance. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This report emphasizes the important role schools play in promoting the health and safety of young people and helping them establish life-long healthy habits. It highlights research findings that demonstrate how effective school health programs can reduce risky behavior and improve learning and describes how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) supports and advances coordinated school health programs based on partnerships between schools and community agencies and organizations. Examples of model coordinated school health programs in the states of Mississippi, New Mexico (Albuquerque), and Arizona are provided. A map of the United States shows which states received funding in 2010 for coordinated school health programs.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Community programs, Community role, Federal programs, Health promotion, Mississippi, New Mexico, Program coordination, Risk reduction, School health programs, Statistics

Law J. 2011. An unprecedented health challenge working with border communities. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Paso del Norte Health Foundation's (PDNHF's) work in promoting health and preventing disease in the Paso del Norte region (including far western Texas, southern New Mexico, and northern Chihuahua, Mexico). The fact sheet discusses the region's public health challenge that has arisen as a result of an upsurge in violent crime in the area. Stakeholders' perceptions and PDNHF's response are presented.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, Crime, Disease prevention, Education, Health promotion, Mental health, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, Mexico, New Mexico, Pubic health, Research, Texas, Violence prevention

New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Infant Toddler Program. 2011. New Mexico vision screening tool. [Rev. ed.]. [Alamogordo, NM]: New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Infant Toddler Program, 5 pp.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help programs have a consistent method of screening vision for children in New Mexico. It discusses the importance of the parent interview, a medical history, examination tips, a brief review of behaviors often associated with visual impairment, developmental vision screening, and discussing observations during the exam. A form is provided for recording screening results, as well as a summary form for possible referral.

Contact: New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 1900 White Sands Boulevard, Alamogordo, NM 88310, Telephone: (575) 437-3505 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-3505 Fax: (575) 439-4411 Web Site: http://www.nmsbvi.k12.nm.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Forms, Medical history, Medical records, New Mexico, State programs, Vision screening

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.