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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (24 total).

Aris C, Weeks C, American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians. n.d.. Taking your baby home from the NICU: Facts about safe sleep. [Marietta, GA]: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure is for parents taking home their newborn that has been discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It defines sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and provides advice on safe sleep positioning and environments for the infant at home. Topics also include the increased risk factors for SIDS of infants that have needed special care at birth, the importance of breastfeeding, not sharing a bed with an infant by parents or siblings, "tummy time", proper bedtime clothing and temperature, the use of a pacifier, and a safe crib. It mentions differences between how things were done in the NICU and how they should be done at home.

Contact: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 528 Raven Way, Naples, FL 34110, Telephone: (239) 431-5425 Fax: (239) 431-5536 E-mail: AASPP@sids.org Web Site: http://www.aaspp.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Consumer education materials, High risk infants, Hospitals, Infant health, Injury prevention, Neonatal intensive care units, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep position

Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic. n.d.. Safe sleep for your special baby. Haymarket, VA: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of a premature baby discusses safe sleep practices that should be followed once the infant is discharged from the hospital. It discusses practices suitable for the NICU that are no longer needed and may be unsafe once the infant is at home. It provides tips on following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines on back sleeping, safe cribs, not covering the baby's head and face, no smoking, no overheating, talking with others who care for the baby, and tummy time for the awake infant who is closely supervised.

Contact: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, P.O. Box 799, Haymarket, VA 20168, E-mail: sidsma27@aol.com Web Site: http://www.sidsma.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Hospitals, Neonatal intensive care units, Premature infants, Prevention, SIDS

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2015. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #3: Perinatal regionalization. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #3: Perinatal Regionalization--percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants born in a hospital with a Level III+ neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Hospitals, Literature reviews, Low birthweight infants, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

National Association of Neonatal Nurses. 2014. Baby steps to home. Glenview, IL: National Association of Neonatal Nurses, 234 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for nurses and parents preparing for an infant's discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information and references for nurses and modifiable documents that can be printed and handed to parents following discussion about their infant's condition. The parent-focused content is available in English and Spanish. Topics include common issues and diagnoses that parents may encounter while their infant is in the NICU, questions to ask their infant's health professional, and after-discharge tips.

Contact: National Association of Neonatal Nurses, 4700 West Lake Ave., Glenview, IL 60025, Telephone: (800) 451-3795 Secondary Telephone: (847) 375-3660 Fax: (888) 477-6266 E-mail: info@nann.org Web Site: http://www.nann.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Infants, Neonatal intensive care units, Nursing, Parent education, Patient discharge

Texas Breastfeeding Collaborative. 2013. Improving breastfeeding support through milk banks. Boston, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality , 1 video (4 min., 4 sec.).

Annotation: This video provides a tour of the Mother's Milk Bank of North Texas. The video explores how the milk bank works, explains why breastfeeding is important for mothers and infants, and discusses why donation milk is important for helping families to support breastfeeding. The video describes the screening and approval process for donors and explains how milk is tested, stored, mixed, bottled, pasteurized, and released to hospitals for use—primarily in neonatal intensive care units.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Community programs, Hospitals, Infant health, Mothers, Multimedia, Neonatal intensive care units, State programs, Texas, Videos, Women's health

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2013. Transitioning newborns from NICU to home: A resource toolkit. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

Annotation: This toolkit includes resources for hospitals to improve safety when newborns transition home from their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) by creating a Health Coach Program, tools for coaches, and information for parents and families of newborns who have spent time in the NICU. Contents include a resource toolkit, family information packets, clinical materials to share with primary care providers, a NICU needs assessment, and a followup telephone survey.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Parent education, Parent support services, Patient discharge

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and postpartum depression in parents of NICU babies. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 10)

Annotation: This webinar, hosted by the National Premature Infant Health Coalition in May 2012, presents the symptoms of acute stress disorders (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and postpartum depression (PPD) and examines research on the potentially dangerous relationship between high levels of emotional distress in new parents and impaired infant development. The webinar's featured speaker, Dr. Michael Hynan, also discusses model programs in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and potential interventions that include screening mothers and fathers for emotional distress; offering psychosocial programs in the NICU; teaching developmental care and parenting competencies; and facilitating parent support groups led by veteran NICU parents and psychologists.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Infant development, Intervention, Mental health, Neonatal intensive care units, Postpartum depression, Posttraumatic stress disorder

Linden DW, Paroli ET, Doron MW. 2010. Preemies: The essential guide for parents of premature babies. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Pocket Books, 633 pp.

Annotation: This book is written for expecting or new parents of premature babies. It is divided into the following sections: before birth, in the hospital, a life together, and other considerations. Before birth outlines some known causes of premature labor and birth and how to prevent them. Topics discussed in the second part include the premature delivery, the neonatal intensive care unit at the hospital, testing and possible complications that occur in the first week, settling down in the hospital, and if baby needs surgery. Part three covers decisions and preparations for taking baby home, what to expect and watch for during early development and possible consequences of prematurity. Part four talks about losing a premature baby and ways of coping with grief and what special arrangements should be expected. Also discussed are examples of famous premature babies that thrived. The appendices include conversion charts, growth charts, a schedule for multiples, cardiopulmonary resuscitation - birth to one year, and resources. A glossary and an index conclude the text.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-671-03491-X.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant death, Infant development, Infant health, Low birthweight, Neonatal intensive care units, Neonatal screening, Parent education, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Premature infant diseases, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth

Hartwell CL. 2010. The many faces of America's children's hospitals: Spotlight on children's hospitals within hospitals. Philadelphia, PA: Health Strategies and Solutions, 16 pp.

Annotation: This white paper provides information about different types of children's hospitals and discusses the pros and cons of children's hospitals within general hospitals vs. freestanding children's hospitals. The paper discusses the pressure to choose which type of hospital to develop, children's hospital within a hospital genres, selecting an appropriate children's hospital genre, what every children's hospital must have, the four genres (freestanding look-alike, neonatal intensive care unit-centric, system consolidator, and community hospital) and the outlook for children's hospitals within hospitals.

Contact: Health Strategies and Solutions, 1628 John F. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 500, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 363-3500 E-mail: info@hss-inc.com Web Site: http://www.hss-inc.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Costs, Hospitals, Infant health, Neonatal intensive care units, Financing, Public policy

State University of New York, Upstate Medical University College of Nursing. [2009]. Sudden infant death syndrome: Facts for NICU nurses. Syracuse, NY: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University College of Nursing,

Annotation: This online resource addresses neonatal nurses about the known hazards that contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and how preventive measures can be incorporated into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and demonstrated to new parents before discharge of the infant. The half-hour video component of the training defines SIDS and sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), the history of SIDS in the United States, SIDS biology and possible causes, external stress factors, other etiologies, risk factors, AAP guidelines, the Back to Sleep campaign, co-sleeping and co-bedding, as well as the role of the NICU nurse as an educator for new parents. Quizzes are given at intervals during the video presentation. Additional resources on the web site include references, a final quiz, an evaluation, and instructions for receiving continuing education credit.

Contact: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, 7250 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210-2375, Telephone: (315) 464-5540 E-mail: http://www.upstate.edu/about/contact.php Web Site: http://www.upstate.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Hospital nurseries, Multimedia, Neonatal death, Neonatal intensive care units, Nurses, Prevention, Resources for professionals, SIDS, Training materials, Videos

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Perinatal Clinical Advisory Committee. 2008. Maryland perinatal system standards: Recommendations. (Rev. ed.). [Baltimore, MD]: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Family Health Administration, 40 pp.

Annotation: These recommendations provide guidelines on perinatal systems that are consistent with the Guidelines for Perinatal Care, 6th edition, issued in 2007 by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Guidelines are provided in the following areas: organization, obstetrical unit capabilities, neonatal unit capabilities, obstetric personnel, pediatric personnel, other personnel, laboratory, diagnostic imaging capabilities, equipment, medications, and education program.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Family and Community Health Services, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201-2399, Secondary Telephone: (800) 456-8900 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/mch/Pages/Home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Diagnostic imaging, Diagnostic techniques, Education, Guidelines, Health care systems, Laboratories, Neonatal intensive care units, Obstetrical care, Pediatrics, Perinatal care, Perinatal services, Standards

Philipp BL. 2005. Final comprehensive report: Enhancing breastfeeding duration in premature infants. Boston, MA: Boston University School of Medicine, Division of General Pediatrics, 37 pp.

Annotation: This final comprehensive report focuses on a study that was conducted to test the hypothesis that breastfeeding peer counselors in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) would increase breastfeeding duration among mothers of premature infants. The report includes a review of the literature, the study design and methods, findings, and a list of products. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Neonatal intensive care units, Peer counseling, Premature infants, Research

Sedlmeyer J. 2005. Implementing the AAP SIDS prevention guidelines during discharge planning in the NICU. Fairfax, VA: Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children, 57 slides.

Annotation: This PowerPoint presentation from the 2005 Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs conference describes activities of a SIDS Prevention Task Force which developed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) sleeping guidelines and a parent handout for parents whose preterm infants grew closer to corrected gestational age and would be soon discharged from the hospital. It provides background of the task force, facts about SIDS, the importance of NICU staff in reducing the risk of SIDS, and behaviors that should be taught to parents. It illustrates what parents see in the NICU that are contrary to the guidelines and provides a chart describing the new guidelines for the Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children NICU.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Hospitals, Neonatal intensive care units, Prevention programs, SIDS

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 1992. Neonatal intensive care: A history of excellence. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This report, which was originally presented at a symposium sponsored by the National Institute on Health in 1985 commemorating Child Health Day, presents a collection of essays written by pioneers in the field on the history and development of the neonatal intensive care unit.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Price unknown. Document Number: NIH 92-2786.

Keywords: Development, History, Neonatal intensive care units

Mitchell A. 1987. Risks of Medication Procedures in Hospitalized Children [Final report]. Brookline, MA: Children's Hospital,

Annotation: This study was designed to generate a number of hypotheses concerning the hazards of medication procedures among infants cared for in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). By describing patterns of use of medication procedures and identifying hazards associated with such exposures, the researcher sought to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from routine therapeutic practices in the NICU. Among the project's findings were links between: (1) The risk of hyperglycemia and dextrose infusion; (2) the risk of intracranial hemorrhage and use of heparin; (3) shock/rash reaction and the use of Vancomycin; and (4) increased serum bilirubin levels following pancuronium bromide. The investigator recommended continued efforts to understand the risks associated with medications and procedures used in NICUs to treat babies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB88-173679.

Keywords: Hospitalized infants, Medication, Neonatal Intensive Care Units, Neonatal morbidity, Neonatal mortality, Newborn infants

Ward JP, ed. 1986. Focus on the neonatal intensive care unit. Park Ridge, IL: Park Ridge Center, 157 pp. (Second opinion: Health, faith and ethics)

Annotation: This book discusses the issue of babies in the neonatal intensive care unit and when it is appropriate to decide not to treat them. It includes a father's journal of his son's stay in the NICU, a discussion of health care reform by Joseph Califano, formerly Secretary of Health and Human Services, and religious dimensions in understanding health.

Contact: Park Ridge Center for the Study of Health, Faith, and Ethics, 205 West Touhy Avenue, Suite 203, Park Ridge, IL 60068, Telephone: (837) 384-3507 Contact Phone: (312) 696-6399 Fax: (837) 384-3557 E-mail: al.hurd@advocatehealth.com Web Site: http://www.parkridgecenter.org/

Keywords: Ethics, Neonatal intensive care units, Treatment withdrawal

Parent Care. 1984. First annual conference for parents of critically ill newborns . Parent Care, 180 pp.

Annotation: This document presents the proceedings of the first annual conference for parents of critically ill newborns, held by Parents of Premature and High Risk Infants International, Inc. October 11-13, 1984 in Salt Lake City. Sessions discussed the Parent Care organization, parent chapters, impact of the neonatal intensive care unit, new frontiers for the NICU, graduation from the newborn ICU, and neonatal ethics.

Keywords: Critical care, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Parents, Self help groups

Allan G, Boggs TR, Clark EL, Ghiates MP, Hervada AR, Kendall N, Leinbach H, Miller WJ, Nelson NM, Peckham GJ Sisson TRC. 1974. Report of the Committee on Infant Intensive Care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Governor's Health Task Force, Committee on Infant Intensive Care, 77 pp.

Annotation: This report provides eleven recommendations designed to reduce neonatal and infant mortality in Pennsylvania, along with supporting data. It emphasizes consolidation and regionalization of perinatal services. The recommendations address definition of fetal death and abortion; reporting abortions; changes in death certificates; availability of perinatal mortality data; regulations for obstetric and newborn hospital services; appointment of a Pennsylvania Department of Health technical advisory body; appointment of a Pennsylvania Maternal and Child Health advisory council; establishment of a program for secondary education in perinatal health; study of inter-hospital transport of distressed newborn and care teams; proposed legislation for health insurance coverage of the unborn or newborn infant; and care for uninsured mothers and infants requiring intensive perinatal or neonatal care.

Keywords: Abortion, Death certificates, Fetal death, Hospital services, Infant mortality, Neonatal intensive care units, Neonatal mortality, Pennsylvania, Regulations, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.