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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2020. Chartbook on healthcare for Asians and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 42 pp., 79 slides. (National Healthcare Quality & Disparities Report chartbooks)

Annotation: This chartbook on Asians and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) is part of a family of documents and tools that support the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (QDR), which was published in 2018. This chartbook includes a summary of trends across measures of healthcare for Asians and NHPIs from the QDR and figures illustrating select measures of healthcare access and quality. A PowerPoint version is also available that users can download for presentations.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 20-0043..

Keywords: Access to health care, Asian Americans, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Measures, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, Trends

Phipps KR, Ricks, TL, Mork NP, Lozon TL. 2019. The oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 1-5 years: Results of the 2018-19 IHS oral health survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, 10 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This data brief focuses on the oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children ages 1–5. The brief presents information on the prevalence of early childhood caries, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in the primary teeth of this population in 2018–2019 and assesses trends since the 2010 survey was conducted. The results of the 2018–2019 survey are presented as five key findings. For each finding, statistical data are included. Implications of the results are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Alaska natives, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Early Childhood caries, Native Americans, Oral health, Statistical data, Surveys

Phipps KR, Ricks, TL. 2017. The oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 6-9 years: Results of the 2016-2017 IHS oral health survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, 11 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This data brief focuses on the oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children ages 6–9. Using data from an ongoing oral health surveillance system the Indian Health Service established in 2010, the brief presents information on the prevalence of dental sealants, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in the primary teeth of this population in 2018–2019 and assesses trends since the 2010 survey was conducted. The results of the 2016–2017 survey are presented as five key findings and one overall recommendation. For each finding, statistical data are included.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Native Americans, Oral health, School age children, Statistical data, Surveys

Ida DJ, SooHoo J, Chapa T. 2012. Integrated care for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities: A blueprint for action—Consensus statements and recommendations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This consensus statement resulted from the summit, Integrated Care for Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Communities: A Blueprint for Action, held in August 15-16, 2011, in San Francisco, California. The document includes information about the summit; the consensus statement itself; a discussion of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) health and behavioral health and of AANHPI populations in general; and recommendations from the summit.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, Asian Americans, Hawaiians, Health, Health behavior, Minority groups, Pacific Islanders, Service integration

Let's Move, White House Domestic Policy Council, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Education. 2011. Let's Move in Indian Country. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an interagency initiative to address childhood obesity and related conditions in American Indians and Alaska Natives. Topics include increasing physical activity and access to affordable, healthy, and traditional foods; supporting and leveraging Indian Country's help, expertise, and commitment; and public private partnerships to further support and expand upon the work happening throughout Indian Country. Resources include fact sheets, a newsletter, a call to action for tribal leaders, and a toolkit and resource guide.

Contact: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20240, Telephone: (202) 208-3100 E-mail: feedback@ios.doi.gov Web Site: http://www.doi.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Child health, Community participation, Food consumption, Health promotion, Native Americans, Obesity, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Social learning

King ML. 2007. Community health interventions: Prevention's role in reducing racial and ethnic disparities. Washington, DC: Center for American Progress, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the use of community-led interventions to alter risky health behaviors among minority populations who have higher rates of diseases and conditions such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol levels, diabetes, tobacco use, physical inactivity, and obesity than their white counterparts. The report, which includes an executive summary, discusses racial and ethnic health disparities; reducing racial and ethnic health disparities through community interventions; tailored community interventions at work; community interventions in the African-American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander populations; budget implications; and policy recommendations. A conclusion and endnotes are included.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Community programs, Diabetes mellitus, Ethnic factors, Financing, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Hypertension, Intervention, Obesity, Pacific Islanders, Physical activity, Public policy, Racial factors, Risk factors, Smoking

Hamm K. 2006. More than meets the eye: Head Start programs, participants, families, and staff in 2005. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 8 pp. (Head Start series, policy brief no. 8; see also Unique no. 28838 (Early Head Start fact sheet), 28875 (Head Start fact sheet), and 36516 (Migrant/Seasonal Head Start). (JMB))

Annotation: This policy brief describes the characteristics of children enrolled in Head Start and their families and the services provided to them during the 2004-2005 program year. The data cover 3- and 4-year olds enrolled in Head Start; pregnant women and infants and children under age 3 enrolled in Early Head Start; infants and children from birth to age 5 enrolled in Migrant and Seasonal Head Start; and children enrolled in American Indian and Alaskan Native Head Start programs. Following an introduction, data figures and discussion are presented on the following topics: (1) Head Start-funded enrollment slots by program type, (2) Head Start disability determination and special services, (3) children's access to health care services before and after Head Start participation, (4) primary child care arrangements during non-Head Start hours, (5) percent change in Head Start families' participation in family services, and (6) teachers with degrees and credentials.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Early Head Start, Enrollment, Family support services, Head Start, Health services delivery, Infants, Native Americans, Pregnant women, Young children

National Adolescent Health Information Center. 2006. 2006 fact sheet on suicide: Adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about suicide among adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24). The fact sheet includes highlights; a pie chart showing suicide's ranking among the leading causes of death in this population; and information about the suicide rates among young adults vs. younger adolescents; suicide rates among young males, young females, and American Indian and Alaska Native males; rates of attempted suicide among female adolescents and female Hispanic adolescents; and trends in suicide rates. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Data and figure sources and notes are included.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescents, Alaska natives, American Indians, Attempted suicide, Hispanic Americans, Suicide, Trends, Young adults

Wyn R, Ojeda VD. 2003. Women's health issues in California: Findings from the 2001 California Health Interview Study. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 20 pp.

Annotation: Using data from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey, this report examines the important health concerns of nonelderly women in California, including their health status, insurance coverage, and access to care. The report focuses on low-income women and women of color. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) California's women: a diverse population, (2) health status, (3) health insurance coverage, (4) access to care issues, (5) discussion and policy implications, and (6) data sources and methods. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes footnotes.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Alaska natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, California, Data, Health insurance, Health status, Hispanic Americans, Low income groups, Public policy, Racial factors, Surveys, Women's health

Emanuel I. 2002. Maternal birthweight and reproductive outcomes: Final report. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Department of Epidemiology, 8 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a retrospective cohort study to investigate intergenerational relationships between the mother's birthweight and suboptimal birth outcomes in the mother's child such as infant low birthweight, preterm birth, infant respiratory distress syndrome, need for a cesarean section, gestational diabetes mellitus, or preeclampsia. Comparisons were made between four ethnic groups: non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics. The report provides a statement of the problem, research objectives, study design and methods, findings, policy implications, suggestions for future research, and a listing of presentations and publications arising from the research. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Cesarean section, Ethnic factors, Final reports, Gestational diabetes, Hispanic Americans, Infant health, Low birthweight, MCH research, Newborn infants, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Respiratory instability

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2001. Mental health: Culture, race, ethnicity—A supplement to Mental health: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General; Washington, DC: for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 203 pp., exec. summ. (23 pp.).

Annotation: This supplement is an outgrowth of the 1999 report by the Surgeon General on mental health and illness. This report undertakes to probe more deeply into mental health disparities affecting racial and ethnic minorities and the role that cultural factors play in mental health. The report is divided into seven chapters including the introduction. Chapter two lays the foundation for understanding the relationships between culture, mental health, mental illness, and mental health services. Chapters three through six provide information about each racial and ethnic minority group: African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific islanders, and Hispanic Americans; including historical context and current status; and access to, availability of, and utilization of mental health services. Chapter seven concludes with promising directions and courses of action to reduce disparities and improve the mental health of racial and ethnic minorities. Each chapter concludes with a list of references. The appendices discuss the inclusion of minorities in clinical trials used to development treatment guidelines and a resource directory of relevant federal and private organizations. The report concludes with an index.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS SMA-01-3613; ISBN 0-16-050892-4.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Cultural diversity, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Mental disorders, Mental health, Minority groups, Pacific Islanders, Racial factors, Research, Trends

Collins KS, Hall A, Neuhaus C. 1999. U.S. minority health: A chartbook. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 161 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook compares findings from several private surveys and national data sources to demonstrate the state of minority health in the United States. It is intended to serve as a quick reference tool for currently available information on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Asians, Pacific Islanders, Blacks, and Hispanics. The chartbook is divided into sections including statistical profiles of racial and ethnic composition of the U.S. population, vital statistics, health status and disease, health care access and utilization, health insurance coverage, and minority health professionals. Each section contains statistical data in the form of tables, graphs, and charts. A list of references is included. An appendix with a description of the surveys used in this analysis is provided.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Data, Demography, Ethnic factors, Health status, Hispanic Americans, Minority health, Pacific Islanders, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Surveys, Vital statistics

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 1998. Tobacco use among U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups: African Americans, American Indians and Alaska natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Hispanics—A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Smoking and Health, 332 pp., exec. summ. (17 pp.).

Annotation: This report offers current information on tobacco use among African Americans, Native Americans, Alaska natives, Asian Americans, Pacific Americans, and Hispanic Americans. The report covers patterns of tobacco use, health consequences of tobacco use, factors which influence tobacco use, and tobacco control and education in these populations. A glossary is included, and an executive summary accompanies the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Contact Phone: (202) 512-1650 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov $20.00 includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Ethnic groups, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Pacific Americans, Pacific Islanders, Prevention, Smoking, Tobacco, Tobacco use

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 1989. Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving: Background papers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 260 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: The background papers in this volume were commissioned to provide a foundation for and launch the discussion of the expert panels of the workshop. The authors presented state of the art in the different fields and describe the various attempts throughout the country and world to prevent alcohol-impaired driving. The topics were alcohol beverage control policies, mass communication effects on drinking and driving, epidemiologic perspectives on drunk driving, controlling injuries due to drinking and driving, the effectiveness of legal sanctions in dealing with drinking drivers, issues in the enforcement of impaired driving laws, transportation and alcohol service policies, injury control, youth impaired driving, problems among Native Americans and Alaska Natives, drunk driving among blacks and Hispanics, treatment, and citizen advocacy.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy, Advocacy, Alaska natives, American Indians, Blacks, Business, Consumer education, Criminal justice system, Data, Epidemiology, Hispanic Americans, Impaired driving, Industry, Injury prevention, Intervention, Law enforcement, Legislation, Mass media, Media campaigns, Motor vehicles, Outreach, Policies, Political systems, Prevention, Rehabilitation

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.