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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (167 total).

Pudelski S. 2017. Cutting Medicaid: A prescription to hurt the neediest kids. Alexandria, VA: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of school leaders about how service delivery and student health would be impacted by a decline in Medicaid reimbursement. The report outlines the survey questions and findings, highlights how students with disabilities and students with low incomes will be impacted by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant, describes how communities will be economically affected by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant for school districts, details the potential of districts to lose critical mental health supports for students that are reimbursable by Medicaid, and notes how district efforts to expand Medicaid coverage to students and their families will be undermined by a block grant or per-capita cap.

Contact: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 1615 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 578-0700 Fax: (703)-841-1543 E-mail: info@aasa.org Web Site: http://www.aasa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Block grants, Child health, Children, Financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, National surveys, Policy development, Reimbursement, School age children, School districts, Service delivery, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

Strengthen the Evidence. 2016. Sample strategies and evidence-based or -informed strategy measures. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document presents sample strategies for improving maternal and child health and measures for demonstrating success. Contents are organized within the following six domains: women/maternal health, perinatal/infant health, child health and/or adolescent health, adolescent health, children and youth with special health care needs, and cross-cutting/life course. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Evidence based medicine, Health promotion, Infants, MCH programs, Measures, Methods, National initiatives, Preventive health services, Program planning, Women

Surgeon General of the United States, Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2016. Turn the Tide. [Washington, DC:] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for health professionals and their clients provide information about opioids and describe ways to reduce the risk of opioid addiction and overdose. Information about taking opioids, safe storage and disposal, a help line, and options for sharing personal experiences are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, National initiatives, Opiates, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety, Self help programs

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. 2016. Preparing for the road ahead: Helping young people transition from foster care to adulthood. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes and vision of a national initiative to help young people transition from foster care and thrive. Contents include information about the initiative's impact, timeline, core strategies, outcome areas, and next steps. The report describes how the initiative is helping young people in foster care achieve critical milestones in permanence, education, employment, financial capability, housing, physical and mental health, and social capital; how the initiative integrates young people's voices into its work; and how it collaborates with national and local partners, policymakers, and young people to create conditions that improve outcomes for youth transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Foster care, National initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. Family engagement in state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs: Results from a survey–Executive summary. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a nationwide survey of maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) directors about family engagement policies and practices in Title V-funded programs. The findings provide a snapshot of strategies to support meaningful family engagement, effective and innovative practices, and areas of need for improvement and technical assistance. Topics include creating a culture of family engagement, levels of family engagement, roles of family staff or consultants, family members employed as staff, sustaining and diversifying family engagement, and evaluating family engagement. An overview of the survey development and response, programmatic definitions of family, and a discussion of the results is included. A series of briefs that detail the results in specific areas are also available. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Families, Leadership, National surveys, Participation, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Sustainability, Title V programs

Barnett WS, Friedman-Krauss AH. 2016. State(s) of Head Start. New Brunswick, NJ: National Institute for Early Education Research, 112 pp.

Annotation: This report describes and analyzes Head Start enrollment, funding, quality, and duration, state-by-state. The report focuses on the 2014–2015 program year but also provides longitudinal data beginning with the 2006–2007 program year. Contents include background on the history of Head Start; what the research says about Head Start's effectiveness; and inequalities in access, quality, duration, and funding. Conclusions and policy recommendations; national figures and overview; and a guide to state profiles, including data points, are also provided.

Contact: National Institute for Early Education Research, Rutgers University, 73 Eastern Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08901, Telephone: (732) 932-4350 Fax: (732) 932-4360 E-mail: sbarnett@nieer.org Web Site: http://nieer.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Early childhood education, Enrollment, Equal opportunities, Financing, Head Start, Low income groups, National programs, Policy development, Quality assurance, Research, Standards, Teaching, Young children

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2016. 6 | 18 Initiative: Accelerating Evidence into Action–State Medicaid & Public Health Convening: Meeting summary. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a convening held on February 8–9, 2016, to launch a collaborative engagement with states to help them explore how to translate the evidence on interventions related to controlling asthma, tobacco cessation, and unintended pregnancy prevention into implementation within state Medicaid programs. Contents include pre-convening planning calls, state identified priorities and state convening meeting objectives, an overview of state convening, state team planning summary results, evaluation summary, and next steps. The appendices contain a description of the 6 | 18 Initiative to align evidence-based preventive practices with emerging value-based payment and delivery models, the meeting agenda, the participant list, and the state action plan template.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Collaboration, Contraception, Health care delivery, Learning, Medicaid, Meetings, Models, National initiatives, Peer groups, Policy development, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Program planning, Reimbursement, State programs, Statewide planning, Teamwork, Tobacco cessation

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention. 2015. Dating Matters® Initiative. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about a comprehensive dating violence prevention initiative focused on adolescents ages 11 to 14 in high-risk, urban communities. Contents include a video that describes the initiative and information about funding for implementation in middle schools and neighborhoods. The website also provides information about online training and profiles of grantees in Baltimore, MD; Chicago, IL; Ft. Lauderdale, FL: and Oakland, CA.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, Cities, Comprehensive programs, Financing, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Middle schools, National initiatives, Neighborhoods, Relationships, Training, Violence prevention

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2015. Best Fed Beginnings final report. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a nationwide three-year effort in partnership with Baby-Friendly USA and the United States Breastfeeding Committee to help hospitals improve maternity care practices to support breastfeeding, and increase the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the United States. The report details the activities of the BFB initiative and evaluates its effectiveness in meeting the mission and aims.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Evaluation, Infant health, Maternity hospitals, Model programs, Mothers, National initiatives, Nutrition

Collective Impact Forum. 2014–. Initiative directory. Boston, MA: Collective Impact Forum, multiple items

Annotation: This website provides information about initiatives that are using the collective impact approach to address social and environmental problems. Users can search for existing initiatives by state/locality, social issue, region, and country. Users can also create a page to highlight the work they are doing; submit information about their progress; hold discussions; and share reports, photos, news, and more.

Contact: Collective Impact Forum, 500 Boylston Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (866) 351-8484 E-mail: info@collectiveimpactforum.org Web Site: http://www.collectiveimpactforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Community programs, Directories, Interdisciplinary approach, International programs, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Networking, Problem solving, Social interaction, State initiatives, Teamwork

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Health insurance and access to care for kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources to help families find health insurance and health care and learn more about health insurance and getting health care for kids and teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Families, Health care financing, Health insurance, National programs, State programs

McCoy C. 2014. State Title V program approaches to improving birth outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 24 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on efforts to reduce non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks gestation and methods that state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs are using to improve birth outcomes. Topics include national and state initiatives to make lowering the number of non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks a priority; the role of state Title V MCH programs in implementing quality improvement programs and payment reforms; and examples from California, North Carolina, and Texas. The appendix contains a matrix of national and regional initiatives to improve birth outcomes including a description, geographic scope, funding, and partners for each initiative.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, National initiatives, Prematurity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regional programs, Reimbursement, State MCH programs, Treatment outcome

Early Childhood Data Collaborative. 2014. 2013 state of states' early childhood data systems. Bethesda, MD: Early Childhood Data Collaborative, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey to assess state early childhood data systems. The report focuses on state data systems' ability to securely link child-level early childhood education (ECE) data across ECE programs and to K-12, health, and social services data systems. Topics include states collecting state-level developmental screening, assessment, and kindergarten entry assessments; status of state ECE data governance structure, authority, and function; and action steps for policymakers and practitioners.

Contact: Early Childhood Data Collaborative, c/o Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9329 E-mail: info@ecedata.org Web Site: http://www.ecedata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data linkage, Early childhood education, Health agencies, Integrated information systems, National surveys, School systems, Social service agencies, State programs

VanLandeghem K, Sloyer P, Gabor V, Helms V. 2014. Developing structure and process standards for systems of care serving children and youth with special health care needs. [Washington, DC]: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; [Palo Alto, CA]: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 31 pp.

Annotation: This white paper from the National Consensus Framework for Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs Project describes how the project has been conducted, highlights findings from project research on capacity and performance of systems of care serving children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and lists recommendations from key stakeholders. The paper also includes case studies of four sites that are using system standards in their work with CYSHCN, in Iowa, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Texas. The standards are available in a separate companion document.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: State programs, Adolescents, Health care systems, National initiatives, Special health care needs, Standards: Children, Young adults

Labarthe D, Grover B, Galloway J, Gordon L, Moffatt S, Pearson T, Schoeberl M, Sidney S. 2014. The public health action plan to prevent heart disease and stroke: Ten-year update. Washington, DC: National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, 107 pp.

Annotation: This document serves as a point of reference for state heart disease and stroke prevention programs and as a framework for health professionals and policymakers on developing a health care system that equally supports prevention and treatment. The content is organized around the following four pillars: the need for action, the platform for action, a call to action, and mobilization for action. The document concludes with next steps for bringing implementation to scale.

Contact: National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, Web Site: http://nationalforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Disease prevention, Heart diseases, National initiatives, State programs, Strategic plans, Strokes

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Bright Futures and state implementation. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 12 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief provides a history and overview of Bright Futures, a national program to promote children's current and future health through a set of guidelines that aim to improve the quality of health promotion and preventive services for children. The brief discusses the role of Bright Futures in the Affordable Care Act, and provides past and present examples of state health agencies' efforts to implement Bright Futures. Topics include initiation and funding, activities, and lessons learned in Illinois, New York, Virginia, and Washington. Brief descriptions of efforts in Maine, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Oregon are also included, as well as recommendations for states.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bright Futures, Children, Guidelines, Health care reform, Health promotion, Illinois, Infants, National programs, New York, Pediatric care, Preventive health services, Quality assurance, State agencies, Virginia, Washington

Kemmerer C, Runnels L, Calondra T, Snebold L. 2014. Conversations with local health departments: Parenting education and skills-building program implementation capacity. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief describes local health department (LHDs) readiness and workforce capacity and identifies opportunities and challenges related to supporting and implementing parenting education and skills-building programs, specifically Legacy for Children. Contents include information about the 2012 Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Survey, focus groups, and results. Topics include community needs assessment and intervention fit, stakeholder engagement, planning and assessment, workforce development and support, monitoring and evaluation, and sustainability. Discussion, implications, and recommendations are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website. Document Number: NA581PDF.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, MCH research, Model programs, National surveys, Parenting education, State programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.