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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Rhyne J. n.d.. North Carolina Childhood Injury Prevention Project: [Final report]. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Human Resources , 49 pp.

Annotation: This project conducted activities on the state and county level, primarily addressing the risk for poisoning, burns, scalds, and motor vehicle injuries for children 4 years of age and younger. Project objectives were to: (1) Develop strategies to make passive injury prevention measures available and accessible, (2) develop incentives for the use of passive injury prevention measures, (3) provide the public with information so that informed decisions could be made to prevent childhood injury, and (4) develop a plan for injury surveillance. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198364.

Keywords: Burns, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Low income groups, Motor vehicle crashes, Poisoning, Safety

Brown M. n.d.. Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project: [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the project address the leading causes of childhood mortality in Oklahoma - motor vehicle crashes, submersions and burns. The overall methodology focused on utilization of intra- and interagency coalitions. Specific strategies included car seat loaners programs, drowning and burn prevention education activities, and smoke alarm programs. The project successfully carried out objectives related to prevention of motor vehicle injuries, drowning and burns. By empowering collaborating agencies and programs, the project has assured continuation of a focus on prevention of pediatric injuries in Oklahoma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161569.

Keywords: Burns, Car Seats, Child, Community-Based Education Programs, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Parents, Poisons, Safety

Greene C. n.d.. Reducing High Infant Mortality in Southeast Louisiana [Final report]. Slidell, LA: Slidell Memorial Hospital Charities, Inc., 29 pp. pp.

Annotation: The project goal was to decrease the infant mortality rate in the target area to the national average by the end of the 3-year project period. The impact objective was to decrease the incidence of low birthweight to 6.5 percent and continue that downward trend to meet the U.S. Surgeon General's goal of 5 percent by the year 2000, and to increase Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment screenings to 80 percent of eligible children. The process objectives were to develop a one-stop perinatal and pediatric health facility, to draw St. Tammany Parish women into early prenatal care through aggressive outreach, and to develop a program of education and community support for indigent families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121875.

Keywords: EPSDT, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Motor Vehicle Crashes, One Stop Shopping, Prenatal Care, Unintentional Injuries

Carney C, McGehe D, Harland K, Weiss M, Raby M. 2015. Using naturalistic driving data to assess the prevalence of environmental factors and driver behaviors in teen driver crashes. Washington, DC: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to examine naturalistic data from crashes that involved adolescent drivers. Topics include characteristics of drivers and passengers, roadway and environment, crashes, vehicle-to-vehicle crashes, and single-vehicle crashes; and driver and passenger behaviors. Contents include a detailed description of the study methodology and the coding sheet with variable definitions.

Contact: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 607 14th Street, N.W., Suite 201, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5944 Fax: (202) 638-5943 E-mail: info@aaafoundation.org Web Site: http://www.aaafoundation.org/home/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Data analysis, Environment, External cause of injury codes, Motor vehicle crashes, Research methodology, Risk factors, Risk taking, Safety, Transportation injuries, Unintentional injuries

Grinnell Mutual Wellness Program, University of Iowa Injury Prevention Research Center, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Blank Children's Hospital, ACT Program. 2014. Steering teens safe: A parent guide for safe teen driving. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa College of Public Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help parents teach adolescents about safe driving. Contents include 22 lessons with examples of talking points and conversation starters to guide effective discussions with adolescents. Topics include basic safety principles, skills for safe driving, special skills for rural roads, special driving situations, and setting guidelines for a child to drive. Information about text messaging and graduated licensing laws are also included.

Contact: University of Iowa College of Public Health, S160 CPHB, 145 N. Riverside Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242, Telephone: (319) 384-1500 Web Site: https://www.public-health.uiowa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Injury prevention, Iowa, Motor vehicle crashes, Parent education, Risk taking, Rural environment, State programs

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2010. State injury indicators report. (5th ed.)—2006 data. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state-level statistical data on injury indicators and outcomes from 26 state health departments that voluntarily participated in this surveillance effort. Categories include indicators for: (1) all-injury violence (2) traumatic brain injury, (3) drowning, (4) fire-related, (5) motor vehicle, (6) poisoning, (7) firearm-related injuries (8) homicide, and (9) suicide. The indicators for each category are presented in tabular form, preceded by explanatory text. The appendix provides instructions for calculating national public health surveillance system indicators using 1999 data.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Drowning, Firearms, Homicide, Injury, Injury surveillance systems, Motor vehicle crashes, Outcome evaluation, Poisoning, Protective factors, Public health, Risk factors, State surveys, Statistics, Suicide, Violence

Peden M, Oyegbite K, Ozanne-Smith J, Hyder AA, Branche C, Rahman AKM, Rivara F, Bartolomeos K, eds. 2008. World report on child injury prevention. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organisation, 211 pp.

Annotation: This report brings together what is known about various types of child injuries and how to prevent them. The report aims to raise awareness about child injuries globally, draw attention to the preventability of child injuries, and make recommendations that all countries can implement to reduce child injuries. Topic covered include road traffic injuries, drowning, burns, falls, and poisonings.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-92-4-156357-4.

Keywords: Child safety, Drowning, Burns, Falls, Injury prevention, International health, Motor vehicle crashes, Poisoning

Carpenter CS, Stehr M. 2007. The effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on seatbelt use, motor vehicle fatalities, and crash-related injuries among youths. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 49 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13408)

Annotation: This paper assesses the effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on self-reported seatbelt use, highway fatalities, and crash-related injuries among high-school-age adolescents using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's national, state, and local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and Fatality Analysis Reporting Systems from 1991 to 2005, a period spanning over 20 changes in seatbelt laws. The authors use quasi-experimental approaches that isolate the independent effects of seatbelt laws net of demographic characteristics, area and year fixed effects, and smooth area-specific trends. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the problem, discusses previous literature, provides a data description and research design, and offers results and a discussion and conclusion. Footnotes and a bibliography are included. Statistical data are presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, High school students, Legislation, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Research, Seat belts, Statistical data, Trends

Levitt SD, Doyle JJ. 2006. Evaluating the effectiveness of child safety seats and seat belts in protecting children from injury. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 28 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 12519)

Annotation: This report is an economic analysis that tests the relative effectiivess of child safety seats, lap and shoulder seatbelts, and lap belts in preventing injuries among motor-vehicle passengers ages 2-6. The report, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue and discusses methods and data, summary statistics, and estimating the relative effects of child safety seats and seatbelts. Conclusions are offered, and references are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Car seats, Child safety, Economics, Motor vehicle crashes, Seat belts, Young children

National Adolescent Health Information Center. 2006. 2006 fact sheet on mortality: Adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about mortality among adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24). The fact sheet includes highlights, a pie chart showing leading causes of death in this population, and information about the mortality rates of young adults vs. younger adolescents, motor vehicle crashes, mortality rates for young adult males and for American Indian and Alaska Native and black males, racial and ethnic disparities, and trends in mortality rates. Statistical informaiton is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Data and figure sources and notes are included.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Adolescent mortality, Age factors, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Ethnic factors, Mortality rates, Motor vehicle crashes, Racial factors, Trends, Young adults

Marin PS, Brown BV. 2005. Are teens driving safer?. Washington, DC: Child Trends Databank, 10 pp. (CrossCurrents, issue 4)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of data relevant to adolescent driving behavior, including adolescent crash rates and trends, licensure rates, seatbelt use, and other risk factors associated with fatal crashes among adolescents. The brief also discusses the possible causes of the high rates of adolescents in fatal crashes, strategies states have taken to make adolescents safer, and some implications for policy and future research. Statistical information is provided in figures and tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Public policies, State programs

Freeman VA, Shanahan EM, Guild PA. 2004. Reducing mortality from motor vehicle crashes for children 0 to 14 years of age: Success in New York and North Dakota. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 80 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the importance of motor vehicle crashes as a cause of death for children in New York and North Dakota and reviews the evidence regarding effective interventions to prevent or reduce injury and mortality. The report also compares rates of motor vehicle crash mortality among children ages 14 and younger in New York and North Dakota to rates in other urban and rural states, and it discusses these two states' efforts to reduce the rates. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report contains two appendices: a list of New York site visit participants and a list of North Dakota site visit participants. References are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, CB# 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 966-5011 E-mail: contact@schsr.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.schsr.unc.edu Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Intervention, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, New York, North Dakota, Prevention

Ginzberg E, Berliner HS, Ostow M. 1988. Young people at risk: Is prevention possible?. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 140 pp. (Conservation of human resources studies in health policy)

Annotation: This book examines four main areas of adolescent malfunctioning: drunk driving, adolescent pregnancy, drug use, and dropping out of school. The relationship between these problem areas, prevention strategies, and public policy is explored. The final chapter discusses directions for policy.

Contact: Westview Press, 2465 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301, Contact Phone: (303) 444-3541 Fax: (720) 406-7336 Web Site: http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com/Westview/index.jsp Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Drug abuse, Drug usage behavior, Motor vehicle crashes, Prevention, Public policy, School dropouts

Birch and Davis Associates. 1984. Report on the 1984 National Conference for Youth on Drinking and Driving. Washington, DC: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, ca. 125 pp.

Annotation: This report from the 1984 National Conference for Youth on Drinking and Driving focussed on the fact that students spend 18 percent of their time at school and 12 percent of their time at work. The workplace has come to rival the school as an influence on young people, and alcohol consumption varies directly with the amount of money that young people have to spend. Members of the conference staff contacted a number of large employers of youth for their opinions and ideas. Young people, educators, and employers of young people formed state delegations and attended this conference to learn more about what they could do to reduce adolescent alcohol use in their community.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: DHHS 84-1356.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol education, Driver education, Impaired driving, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Traffic injuries

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.