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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (49 total).

McDaniel M, Lowenstein C. 2013. Depression in low-income mothers of young children: Are they getting the treatment they need?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides a national look at rates of major depression and treatment in low-income mothers of young children. It discusses how depression is more prevalent and severe among low-income mothers and the effects on development in infants and young children, how low-income mothers are less likely to receive treatment, and how different types of treatment are offered and mother-reported effectiveness.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Depression, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Young children

Howell E, Golden O, Beardslee W. 2013. Emerging opportunities for addressing maternal depression under Medicaid. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the problem of maternal depression and its impact not only on the low-income mother but on her children. Topics include effective screening and treatment, Medicaid's potential role, issues outlined in the Affordable Care Act, challenges to providing services to mothers with depression enrolled in Medicaid, and emerging opportunities to address the challenges. A summary, recommendations, and references are also included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Maternal mental health, Medicaid, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Screening

Duke Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Efficacy and safety of screening for postpartum depression. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 215 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 106)

Annotation: This report describes the results of a 2004-2012 literature search that evaluated the performance of screening instruments for postpartum depression, potential benefits and harms of screening, and impact on appropriate postscreening actions. Report contents include an introduction to postpartum depression and its adverse outcomes, screening, clinical and socioeconomic factors affecting risk; chapters on the study methods and results; a discussion of the findings; and conclusions and references. Appendices provide further detail into how the study was performed.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 13-EHC064-EF.

Keywords: Literature reviews, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Research methodology, Screening

Golden O, McDaniel M, Loprest P, Stanczyk A. 2013. Disconnected mothers and the well-being of children: A research report. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents research findings on the major risks to children’s development, the prevalence of those risks among disconnected families, and the potential consequences for children. It also describes potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. Finally, directions for future research are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Life course, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Poverty, Risk factors, Single mothers, Socioeconomic status, Unemployment

Sontag-Padilla L, Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Lovejoy SL, Firth R. 2013. Maternal depression: Implications for systems serving mother and child. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights evidence on the impact of maternal depression on the mother and child as it relates to the public-sector systems that serve them and discusses potential short- and long-term cost implications. This brief describes a supplemental component of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children initiative implemented in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which successfully implements depression screening in early intervention, develops cross-system referral processes, engages caregivers in services, and increases local capacity for providing relationship-based services by addressing many of the barriers identified in earlier stages of the collaborative’s work.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early interventions services, Local initiatives, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression

Filene JH, Snell EK, Lee H, Knox V, Michalopoulos C, Duggan A. 2013. The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start: First annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 66 pp. (OPRE report 2013-54)

Annotation: This first annual report uses random assignment design to assess the impacts of evidence-based home visiting programs for disadvantaged expectant mothers and to examine the effects of home visiting programs on birth outcomes and maternal and infant health and health care. The study also collects and analyzes information on local implementation processes. It includes a description of the study and the similarities and differences between two national home visiting models that are included in the study: Healthy Families America (HFA) and Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP).

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Mother child relations, Pregnant women, Program evaluation

Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington. [2012]. My guide to working and breastfeeding: Tips on how to make working and breastfeeding work for you. [Seattle, WA]: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brochure, which is geared toward working mothers who are breastfeeding, provides information about how to successfully breastfeed while working outside the home. The brochure discusses why it is important to continue breastfeeding after returning to work, introducing a bottle, choosing child care, rights of breastfeeding women, pumping and storing breastmilk at work, creating a back-to-work plan, and overcoming challenges. The brochure is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington, 155 North East 100th Street, #500, Seattle, WA 98125, Telephone: (206) 281-8032 Fax: (206) 270-8891 E-mail: rachels@wihtinreachwa.org Web Site: http://www.breastfeedingwa.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bottle feeding, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Child care, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Parent child relations, Parent rights, Spanish language materials, Women's rights, Working mothers

Berger LM, McLanahan S,. 2012. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: Influences of parental characteristics, relationships, and behaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 43 pp. (Fragile families working paper: 11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines differences in child outcomes by family type, defined by the marital and biological status of parents who live with a child. The paper investigates the extent to which differences in cognitive skills and behavior problems among 5-year-olds living in different types of families are associated with differences in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors between family types. The authors then decompose the mean difference between family types in each outcome into the proportion explained by differences between family types in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors and the proportion explained by differences between family types in the influence of these factors on outcomes. Methods and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Families, Fathers, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Research, Statistical data, Young children

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Legacy for Children [Program web site]. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,

Annotation: This website provides information about Legacy for Children, an evidence-based program whose aim is to improve child outcomes by promoting positive parenting among mothers of infants and young children with low incomes. Information is provided on the program's philosophy, how the program works, and the intervention. More information about program study sites is offered, and links to related pages are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Family support, Family support programs, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Programs, Young children

Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies. 2011. Reducing effects of postpartum depression: Provider education and maternal empowerment. [Alexandria, VA]: Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies, 1 video (ca. 50 min.).

Annotation: This archived webinar, broadcast July 13, 2011, discusses issues surrounding postpartum and perinatal depression (PPD) and the impact on the health and well-being of mothers and their infant's neurobiological development. Topics include how underreported or underdiagnosed PPD is; varying levels of severity including healthy rebound, "baby blues", diagnosed perinatal depression, postpartum bi-polar disorder, and the rare postpartum psychosis. Topics also include maternal stresses due to lacks of sleep/exhaustion, depression stigma, previous psychological or medical histories, post-traumatic stress from unexpected C-section or adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, partner or violence abuse, and financial stresses. Social risk factors for depression such as multiple births or feeling of isolation are also discussed. Resources are discussed including model state programs, online resources, proposed legislation, and the importance of establishing local postpartum depression networks and support services.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Early childhood development, Hotlines, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent support services, Parenting, Perinatal care, Postnatal care, Postpartum depression, Resources for professionals

Berger LM, McLanahan SS. 2011. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: How do characteristics and relationships matter?. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 50 pp. (Fragile Families working paper: WP11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines the role of individual and family characteristics and relationships, with regard to differences in well-being for children living with their biological mother and either their biological father or a social father. It investigates cognitive skills and externalizing behavior problems for 5-year-olds; the importance of mother, father, and child characteristics; mother-father relationships and co-parenting; mother-child relationships; and father-child relationships.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child development, Cognitive development, Families, Father child relations, Mother child relations, Parenting, Relationships, Parent child relations, Young children

Bertrand M, Pan J. 2011. The trouble with boys: Social influences and the gender gap in disruptive behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17541)

Annotation: This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. The authors discuss data used, what drives the gender gap in non-cognitive skills, and why boys raised by single mothers are particularly at risk.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Families, Female children, Income factors, Low income groups, Male children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Research, School role, Single mothers

Bucio GO. 2011. Helping Latin-American immigrant pregnant women exposed to trauma: Reflections on mirroring. Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2 pp. (Spotlight on culture)

Annotation: This document defines maternal "mirroring" within the context of culture, explains how it can be used to help mothers work through traumatic experiences, and examines ways that therapists can use it to foster the mother-infant relationship during the perinatal period.

Contact: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Resource Center for Child Traumatic Stress, , 905 West Main Street, Suite 25B , Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: (919) 682-1552 Secondary Telephone: (310) 235-2633 Fax: (919) 667-9578 E-mail: nationalresourcecenter@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.nctsnet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Acculturation, Cultural factors, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Immigration, Latin America, Mother child relations, Perinatal health, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Pregnant women, Psychotherapy, Trauma

Public Broadcasting System, This Emotional Life . 2010. Early moments matter: Small steps, long-lasting effects. [Seattle, WA]: Vulcan Productions, 7 items.

Annotation: This toolkit for parents, families and child services professionals introduces ways in which parents and caregivers can help their infants build secure attachments, examines challenges encountered in the process, and provides suggestions on how challenges may be overcome. The toolkit includes a 30 minute DVD, a quick-reference guide answering attachment and parenting questions, three informational brochures and tips printed on a magnet and a bookmark. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Early Moments Matter, Web Site: http://www.earlymomentsmatter.org $10, plus $2.50 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bonding, DVDs, Family life education, Fathers, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mothers, Multimedia, Newborn infants, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Spanish language materials

Le H. [2009]. Preventing postpartum depression in high-risk pregnant Latinas: Effects on maternal and infant health—Final comprehensive report. [Washington, DC: Department of Psychology, George Washington University], 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to study low-income Latinas at high-risk for developing postpartum depression to provide cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at teaching women mood regulation skills to prevent the onset of major depressive episodes and at improving mother-infant relationships. Contents include a description of the nature of the research, the project's purpose and scope, and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature; study design and methods; details of the findings; and a discussion and interpretation of the findings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention services, Final reports, Hispanic Americans, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Prevention services

Cardone I, Gilkerson L, Wechsler N. 2008. Teenagers and their babies: A perinatal home visitor's guide. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 163 pp.

Annotation: This book provides home visitors with examples on how to help expectant and new adolescent parents build deep and enduring bonds of attachment with their baby. Methods and strategies based on Community-Based Family Administered Neonatal Activities are discussed in a step-by-step review of how to implement a research-validated, structured intervention plan. Examples from six prenatal and one postnatal home visits describe techniques and activities designed to help build the strong mother-child relationships that prevent child abuse and strengthen the self-confidence and competence of young families. The appendices include resources on pregnancy and newborn infants , as well as information on fetal movement and newborn behavior, hearing, behavioral states, touch, smell and taste, vision, and a postnatal home visiting guide.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $29.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-934019-16-0.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Early intervention services, Fetal development, Home visiting, Mother child relations, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Pregnant adolescents, Training materials

Knitzer J, Theberge S, Johnson K. 2008. Reducing maternal depression and its impact on young children: Toward a responsive early childhood policy framework. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 25 pp. (Project Thrive, issue brief no. 2)

Annotation: This policy brief provides an overview of why it is important to address maternal depression as a central part of the effort to ensure that all young children enter school ready to succeed. The brief highlights (1) what research says about the impact of maternal depression on infants and young children and the prevalence of maternal depression; (2) examples of community and programmatic strategies to reduce maternal depression and prevent negative cognitive, social emotional, and behavioral impacts on young children; (3) key barriers to focusing more attention on maternal depression in policies to promote healthy early child development and school readiness; (4) state efforts to address policy barriers and craft more appropriate policy responses, and (5) recommendations for national ,state, and local policymakers.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Depression, Early childhood development, Local programs, MCH research, Mothers, National programs, Parent child relations, Postpartum depression, Public policy, School readiness, State programs, Women's health

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. The consequences of unplanned pregngancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet lists some of the consequences of unplanned pregnancy related to child health and development; parents and relationships; preconception care, prenatal care, and infant health; child health and development and family environment; and mothers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Child development, Child health, Families, Infant health, Mental health, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Postpartum depression, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Relationships, Unplanned pregnancy

Minkovitz CS. [2007]. Fathers, maternal depressive symptoms, and parenting [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Population and Family Health Sciences, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to assess whether father involvement influences the relation of maternal depressive symptoms and maternal depression with maternal parenting and children's well-being. Report contents include an introduction into the nature of the research problem, the purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation, and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature; the study design and methods; detailed findings; a discussion and interpretation of findings; and policy implications. References conclude the report [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Final reports, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent participation, Postpartum depression

Lamaze International. 2007. Advancing normal birth. Journal of Perinatal Education 16(1 Suppl.):1S-96S. Winter 2007.,

Annotation: This supplemental issue of the Journal of Perinatal Education focuses on the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services' initiative for improving maternity services and promoting normal birth. It describes principles underlying the Mother-Friendly Childbirth Initiatives, identifies the ten steps of Mother-Friendly Care and the evidence basis for the ten steps in separately authored articles. The appendix includes an article discussing the rationales and systematic reviews of both home birth and freestanding birth centers. Additional discussion and commentary is provided.

Contact: Lamaze International, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036 , Telephone: (202) 367-1128 Secondary Telephone: (800) 368-4404 Fax: (202) 367-2128 E-mail: info@lamaze.org Web Site: http://www.lamaze.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alternative birth styles, Birthing centers, Consumer satisfaction, Delivery rooms, Health services delivery, Home childbirth, Labor, Mothers, Physician patient relations, Pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.