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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (622 total).

New York State Department of Health, Center for Community Health, Division of Epidemiology, Injury Control Program. n.d.. Violence prevention demonstration projects: Project summaries. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Injury Control Program, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summaries of five model programs in violence prevention supported by the New York State Department of Health. Several programs focus on training for youth and parents. Other topics addressed include mentoring, community service, mediation, conflict resolution, and rape crisis services.

Keywords: Model programs, New York, Violence prevention

Bogenschneider K, Small S, Riley D. n.d.. An ecological, risk-focused approach for addressing youth-at-risk issues. Chevy Chase, MD: National 4-H Center, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a prevention model to reduce problem behavior in adolescents by identifying risk factors and protective factors in an adolescent's environment and targeting gaps between the two at all stages of the adolescent's environmental system—individual, family, peers, school, work, and community. The paper reviews current research on risk and protective factors that influence the well being of youth and suggests implications of this research for developing comprehensive community based prevention programs.

Contact: National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 961-2800 E-mail: info@fourhcouncil.edu Web Site: http://www.fourhcouncil.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Community programs, Environmental influences, Models, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. Technical assistance sampler on: Using technology to address barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the use of technology to overcome barriers to learning. Topics include information systems management, multimedia aids to facilitate intervention, in situ and distance learning, and model programs and guides. A list of additional references is also included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Education, Information systems, Intervention, Learning, Mental health, Model programs, Technology

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. n.d.. Successful strategies hospitals can use to support safe sleep. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 2 pp. (Insights)

Annotation: This chart lists the highest-rated strategies and change ideas from the first cohort of hospitals on the National Action Partnership to Promote Safe Sleep (NAPPSS-IIN). Categories include active endorsement of American Academy of Pediatric guidelines for infant safe sleep; knowledge, skills and self-efficacy of infant caregivers to practice safe sleep for every sleep; and activated community champions.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org

Keywords: Infants, Model programs, Safety, Sleep position

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. n.d.. Promising practices for eliminating disparities in sleep-related infant deaths. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 2 pp. (Insights)

Annotation: This resource highlights practices identified by research NICHQ conducted to inform the Missouri Safe Sleep Coalition’s Strategic Plan to reduce infant unsafe sleep fatalities in Missouri.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org

Keywords: Infants, Model programs, Safety, Sleep position

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2020]. The case for integrated behavioral health care for mothers, children, and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes treatment gaps experienced by women and children with substance abuse or mental disorders, benefits of integrated behavioral health care, and services provided in primary care settings to address these gaps, including Health Resources and Services Administration-funded Pediatric Mental Health Care Access (PMHCA) and Screening ad Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Behavioral Disorders (MDRBD) programs. The fact sheet gives examples from HRSA awardees in Missouri, Rhode Island, Louisiana, and Kansas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Children, Mental disorders, Model programs, State initiatives, Substance use disorders, Women

Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs. 2020. ESM development guide: Evidence-based or informed strategy measures. Washington, DC: Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, 26 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides a summary of evidence-based/informed strategy measures (ESMs) as part of the 2018/2020 MCH Block Grant submission as seen through the results-based accountability (RBA) framework. It provides tools to help state Title V agencies ensure their programs have the greatest potential to be effective for the families they serve. For each of the 15 National Performance Measures (NPMs) the document provides evidence strategies and examples of field-generated measures currently used by states. It also provides resources for a structured planning process and finding, implementing, and measuring evidence-based/informed programs. Social determinants of health and health equity tools are included, and information on requesting technical assistance.

Contact: Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 3300 Whitehaven St., N.W., Suite 1200A, Washington, DC 20007, Web Site: https://www.mchevidence.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Evidence based practice, Maternal health, Measures, Model programs, Program planning, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Keating K, Murphey D, Daily S, Ryberg R, Laurore J. 2020. Maternal and child health inequities emerge even before birth. , 52 pp. (State of babies yearbook 2020)

Annotation: This document summarizes evidence of serious disparities in infant and maternal outcomes related to race and presents strategies to ameliorate them, including existing policies and programs and promising practices states can pursue.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care disparities, Infant health, Maternal health, Minority groups, Minority health, Model programs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2020. Program implementation: Awardee strategies for success. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes successful program implementation strategies of Pediatric Mental Health Care Access (PMHCA) Program and Screening and Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Behavioral Disorders (MDRBD) Program, which support pediatric primary care and maternal health care providers address behavioral health disorders. Topics include engaging with partners, expanding program reach through training, and using local champions.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Child health, Federal grants, Maternal health, Model programs

Watts MH, Michel KH. 2020. Equitable enforcement to achieve health equity: An introductory guide for policymakers and practitioners. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide poses a series of questions that policymakers, advocates, and enforcement officials should ask when drafting, implementing, and enforcing a public health policy. It aims to help such actors explore (1) the equity implications of traditional public health enforcement tools, and (2) strategies to avoid unintended negative consequences when enforcing violations of the law. The guide also explores best practices in design and development of enforcement provisions that avoid inequitable impacts and promote community health.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Best practices, Health equity, Law enforcement, Model programs, Public health, Public policies

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 1: Percent of women with a past year preventive visit. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 1, percent of women with a past year preventive visit. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) strengthen data systems and expand the evidence base; (2) enable healthy living; (3) improve access to care; (4) ensure high quality health care for women; (5) ensure high quality maternity care; and (6) other program strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Model programs, Prevention, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs, Women's health

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 6: Percent of children, ages 9 through 35 months, who received a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool in the past year. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 6, percent of children, ages 9 through 35 months, who received a developmental screening using a parent-completed screening tool in the past year. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) data collection, measurement, and existing landscape; (2) policy research, development, and implementation; (3) systems coordination; (4) technical assistance and training; (5) education, engagement, and resource development; and (6) other program strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Developmental screening, Infants, Model programs, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 9: Percent of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are bullied or who bully others. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 9, percent of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are bullied or who bully others. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) assessment; (2) communication efforts; (3) implementation of evidence-based practices; (4) technical assistance and training; (5) policy and systems approaches; and (6) other program strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Model programs, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs

Le L, Brady R, Hanssen P, Perry DF, Richards J. 2019. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 11 medical home evidence review. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, 104 pp. (brief, 5 pp. ). (Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs)

Annotation: This report reviews evidence-informed and evidence-based strategies that Maternal and Child Health (MCH)Block Grant programs can implement to address National Performance Measure 11: Medical Home. It gives background information on pediatric medical homes; describes the national performance measure; discusses the approach used for the evidence review analysis; summarizes strategies identified in the evidence review; and discusses implications of the research. IT also discusses how the MCH Evidence Center can help state Title V programs implement interventions selected from this review. The brief summarizes the report.

Contact: Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 3300 Whitehaven St., N.W., Suite 1200A, Washington, DC 20007, Web Site: https://www.mchevidence.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child health, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Medical home, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 10: Number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, with a preventive medical visit in the past year. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 10: Number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, with a preventive medical visit in the past year Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) improve access and uptake of preventive services;; (2) improve quality of preventive services; (3) improve statesystems-level policies and practices; and (4) positive youth development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Health supervision, Model programs, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 12: Percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who received services necessary to make transitions to adult care. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 12: Percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who received services necessary to make transitions to adult care. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) youth and family education and leadership development; (2) health care professional workforce development; (3) care coordination; (4) communications and social media; and (5) measurement and assessment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Model programs, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs, State programs, Title V programs, Transition to adult services, Young adults

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2019. Promising practices for safe sleep to inform the Missouri Safe Sleep Strategic Plan. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document describes promising practices for improving infant safe sleep and reducing infant mortality caused by Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID) in these areas: (1) active endorsements of American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines; (2) infant caregiver knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy; (3) community champions; and (4) supportive policies for safe sleep practices.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Missouri, Model programs, Sleep position, State programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2018. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 4: Breastfeeding [NPM 4 brief]. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies for state Title V programs to consider to increase the percent of infants who are ever breastfed and the percent of infants brastfed exclusively through 6 months of age. Contents include information about the evidence continuum and the approach to the review, including examples of each type of intervention and its evidence rating; key findings; and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc

Keywords: Block grants, Breastfeeding, Evidence-based practice, Infants, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Garcia S, Payne E, Strobino D, Minkovitz C, Gross S. 2018. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 4 breastfeeding evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 69 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percent of infants ever breastfed and the percent of infants breastfed exclusively through 6 months. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc

Keywords: Block grants, Breastfeeding, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.