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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (218 total).

Peter M. n.d.. Medical Home Project: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, 30 pp.

Annotation: The goals of this project were to: (1) Develop and demonstrate office-based models that assure comprehensive services through the medical home for all children, especially those served under Part H of P.L. 99-457; (2) promote effective linkages and coordination of care between the medical home and early intervention service providers through community forums; and (3) gather, develop, and disseminate nationally creative strategies that promote comprehensive care through the medical home. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121-891.

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Early Intervention, Information dissemination, Medical Home, Minority Groups, PL 99-457, Service Coordination

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Health Equity. 2018. Health equity report 2017. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 121 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a compreh­­­­ensive analysis of HRSA’s program efforts in reducing health disparities and promoting health equity for various populations at the national, state, and local levels. The report addresses HRSA’s key Strategic Plan goals of improving access to quality health care and services, strengthening the health workforce, building healthy communities, and improving health equity. Trends in health disparities and improvements in health equity are presented for a number of program areas, including maternal and child health, primary health care access and quality, health care systems, HIV/AIDS, mental and behavioral health, chronic disease prevention and health promotion, health workforce, and rural-urban and geographic disparities.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov

Keywords: Access to health care, Federal programs, Health care disparities, Minority health

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Health and health care for all: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health. 2016-. Resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health, irregular.

Annotation: The Resource Guide to Health Disparities Resources is an easy-to-use guide published by the Office of Minority Health. This guide lists phone numbers and addresses to OMH regional coordinators, Public Health Service minority liaisons, Federal information centers and clearinghouses, and national organizations, categorized by target population. There is also a section on minority colleges.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Asian Americans, Asian language materials, Blacks, Directories, Federal agencies, Health services, Hispanic Americans, Minority health, Organizations, Pacific Islanders, Public health services, Resource centers, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, State agencies

Snyder JE. 2016. Community health workers: Roles and responsibilities in health care delivery system reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews health services research findings on community health workers (CHWs) and considers key challenges for CHWs to improve health care delivery, including oral health care delivery. Topics include major roles for CHWs in the health care system, a national profile of CHWs, evidence on the clinical impact of CHWs, the policy impact potential for CHW interventions, opportunities for reimbursement through Medicaid, and state and health care innovation models.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Allied health personnel, Barriers, Community health aides, Community role, Culturally competent services, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Home health aides, Low income groups, Medicaid, Minority groups, Oral health, Patient care teams, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Reimbursement, Service delivery systems, Standards, Sustainability, Training, Work force

Lesley B. 2016. The racial generation gap and the future of our children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights five demographic trends that illustrate challenges and opportunities for children. Topics include a declining federal investment in children, a growing difference between the share of the population younger than 18 that is a racial or ethnic minority compared to those who are 65 and older, a growing child population in geographic regions with the poorest outcomes in child well-being, growth in minority voters who are highly supportive of children's programs, and changing gender roles and growing support among younger men for children's issues.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Barriers, Child health, Children, Equal opportunities, Federal aid, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minority groups, Population growth, Racial factors, Role, Trends

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Social factors affecting pediatric oral health in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about students' oral hygiene practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages. It discusses third-grade students' access to toothbrushes, toothbrushing and flossing practices, and consumption of sugar-containing beverages, as well as whether they have visited a dentist; middle school students’ toothbrushing practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages; and high school students’ consumption of soda.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental caries, Health behavior, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Prevalence, Rural population, Social factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Sugar

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Pediatric oral health disparities in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about oral health disparities among third grade students, middle school students, and high school students in North Dakota. Charts present data on tooth decay rates by race and National School Lunch Program status, dental visits in the past 12 months by race, and number of cavities by race. Recommendations for preventing tooth decay and improving oral health among children and adolescents from minority groups and among those from families with low incomes are included.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental care, Dental sealants, Fluorides, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health status, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Oral health, Population surveillance, Preventive health services, Screening, State surveys, Statistical data, Students

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2015. Sugary drinks in communities of color: Recent research and policy options to reduce consumption. Washington, DC: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 20 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief investigates sugary drink consumption in communities of color, focusing on the public health impact and marketing of such products, and policy options to facilitate healthy beverage consumption. It also discusses how decision makers can work to prevent childhood obesity and related illnesses by advancing policies to reduce the marketing and appeal of sugary drinks—and increase the availability of healthy alternatives—in communities of color.

Contact: Leadership for Healthy Communities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5112 E-mail: info@leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Web Site: http://www.leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Marketing, Minority groups, Minority health, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Sugar

Oral Health Colorado. 2015. Smart mouths, smart kids: Improving dental health for Colorado students. Nederland, CO: Oral Health Colorado, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information and resources on assessing the feasibility of initiating school- linked oral health services and designing and building a sustainable school oral health pro- gram. Contents include resources for generating ideas, assessing community needs, creating a budget, developing a business plan, providing a rationale for activities, framing an idea, build- ing a program, and maintaining and sustaining a successful school oral health program. The toolkit also includes a data application (a targeted and focused electronic health record) that can be used to monitor children’s oral health status over time.

Contact: Oral Health Colorado, P.O. Box 1335, Nederland, CO 80466, Telephone: (303) 258-3339 E-mail: deborah@oralhealthcolorado.org Web Site: http://www.oralhealthcolorado.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Low income groups, Minority groups, Oral health, Preventive health services, Relationships, Rural population, School aged children, School linked programs, State programs, Sustainability

Foster L, Booth M, Reusch C. 2015. Reducing early childhood tooth decay: An overview for state policymakers. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief for state policymakers presents strategies for addressing the problem of early childhood caries (ECC) in participants enrolled in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The brief defines ECC, describes the disproportionate impact of ECC on children ages 2–5 from families with low incomes and from minority households, and outlines ways that states can promote ECC prevention and management within Medicaid and CHIP policies. Topics include emphasizing prevention, assessing and addressing risk, educating and engaging parents, and supporting providers.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Disease prevention, Early childhood caries, Health care disparities, Health promotion, Low income groups, Medicaid, Minority groups, Oral health, Policy development, State programs, Young children

Kelly RL. 2015. Kelly report 2015: Health disparities in America. Washington, DC: Congresswoman Robin L. Kelly, 143 pp.

Annotation: This report frames the discourse on public health and efforts to advance the development of effective strategies to improve health outcomes in minority communities. Contents include commentaries and reports on improving access to care and diversity in care; medical innovation and digital health; and equity, outcomes, and health disparities. Topics include breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and stroke, childhood obesity, child nutrition and food scarcity, childhood asthma, colorectal cancer, diabetes, hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, lupus, mental health, oral health, and sleep disparities. Recommendations for achieving health equity are included.

Keywords: Barriers, Cultural diversity, Government role, Minority groups, Minority health, Outcome and process assessment, Program development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Work force

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2015. Report to Congress on minority health activities as required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148). Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 77 pp.

Annotation: This report responds to the reporting requirements of section 10334(a) of the Affordable Care Act and provides an update to Congress on U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) programs and activities related to minority health. Contents include background; a summary of minority health activities by agency; and information about coordination, integration, and accountability.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Coordination, Federal agencies, Federal initiatives, Federal programs, Health care reform, Minority health, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Progress reports, Service integration

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

First Focus. 2015. Big ideas: Pioneering change–Innovative ideas for children and families. Washington, DC: First Focus, 153 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 14 papers outlines ways to create opportunities for families in poverty. Topics include include emerging two-generation policies, using housing rules to tackle education inequalities for minority children, the costs of raising children, implementing a child allowance program, Roth IRAs and savings accounts for children, community schools and educational equity, higher-education tax spending, coordinating health care with home visits for new families, a policy agenda to expand economic opportunity, immigration decisions and children, systems of care to address the needs of commercially sexually exploited youth, and practices and policies to reduce the burden of childhood asthma.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Child health, Equal opportunities, Families, Family centered care, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Minority groups, Models, Organizational change, Policy development, Poverty, Service delivery, Systems development, Vulnerability, Youth

National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health. 2014. Women of color health data book (4th ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health, 98 pp.

Annotation: This document is intended for use by policy makers and advocates of women's health issues. It addresses issues of minority women's health, covering Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, with special attention to adolescent and elderly women. Information is presented about life expectancy, major causes of death, behavior and lifestyles, risk factors, prenatal health care services, access to health insurance and services, and morbidity and mortality. The document includes numerous graphs, and a list of references. It concludes with recommendations to improve the health of women of color.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-4000 Secondary Telephone: (301) 402-9612 Fax: (301) 496-0017 E-mail: NIHInfo@OD.NIH.GOV Web Site: http://www.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH 98-4247.

Keywords: Adolescent health, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Morbidity, Older adults, Risk factors, Statistics, Women's health

National Alliance for Hispanic Health. 2014. About our health: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 41 pp. (Hispanic community heath study)

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to document the health of Hispanics/Latinos in selected United States locations. All content is presented in English and Spanish and includes a description of the study and participants and results across the field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, IL; and San Diego, CA) in the following areas: asthma, oral health (based on a dental exam), depression, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and health habits. Tips to improve health are also included.

Contact: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 1501 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1401, Telephone: (202) 387-5000 Secondary Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health behavior, Health promotion, Health status, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Research, Spanish language materials

Adamo C. 2014. The reproductive and sexual health of young men of color [YMOC]: Redressing disparities and engaging YMOC in prevention. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, Young Men's Initiative, 4 pp. (The facts)

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.