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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (37 total).

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. n.d.. Helping children cope during deployment. Bethesda, MD: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2 pp. (Courage to care)

Annotation: This fact sheet, which is geared toward parents and family caregivers, contains information to help children cope during a parent's deployment. The fact sheet presents commonly asked questions and their responses. General tips for communicating with children of all ages, as well as advice for communicating with children from age 3 through adolescents according to their ages, are also included.

Contact: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (800) 515-5257 E-mail: webmaster@usuhs.gov Web Site: http://www.usuhs.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Child mental health, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Coping, Families, Military, Parent child relations, Parents

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. n.d.. Advancing the health of the family left behind: Fact sheet for providers. Bethesda, MD: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2 pp. (Courage to care)

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on the anxieties and concerns of families, especially children, of deployed soldiers. The fact sheet defines some of the critical phases and issues of family vulnerability during deployment and provides advice and language that can enhance interactions with the family left behind. Topics covered include the following reference points for health professionals and families: (1) preparing children for departure, (2) communicating with children during deployment, and (3) reuniting. A brief list of resources for parents and health professionals is provided.

Contact: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (800) 515-5257 E-mail: webmaster@usuhs.gov Web Site: http://www.usuhs.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Military, Parent child relations, Parents

Zero To Three, Military Families Projects. 2015-. Babies on the homefront. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides military and veteran parents ideas for enhancing everyday moments with their infant or toddler. Contents include behavior tips, ideas for creating activities, and information and ideas on self-care. Parents can personalize the app with their infant’s picture and create a photo gallery of their child’s moods. Parents can sort the information by their young child’s age and specify their situation as At Home, Leaving Soon, Deployed, Home Again, a Veteran, or visiting a hospital. The app also allows access to a series of videos on parenting for military and veteran families. The resource is available in English and Spanish. A handout to share with parents and professionals is also available.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Military, Mobile applications, Parents, Spanish language materials, Toddlers

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2014. Working effectively with military families: 10 key concepts all providers should know. Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 4 pp.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2014. VA spina bifida program: Outreach to key stakeholders and written guidance for claims audit follow-up activities needed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presenting findings from an evaluation of the administration of spina bifida health care benefits for children of servicemembers and veterans by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Topics include the extent to which VHA conducts outreach about available benefits, what is known about available processed health care claims, and what oversight VHA conducts of the claims process. Recommendations for executive action are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-14-564.

Keywords: Access to health care, Administration, Children with special health care needs, Employee benefits, Federal programs, Health care utilization, Military, Outreach, Spina bifida, Utilization review

Murphey D. 2013. Home front alert: The risks facing young children in military families. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief highlights how military life affects the health and well-being of infants and young children from birth through age 5. It presents background about the special circumstances that characterize the lives of military families and discusses how military deployment today differs from what it was like in the past; issues related to children being separated from parents, residential mobility, child care, and parental return from deployment; and policy implications.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. No. 2013-31.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Families, Military, Risk factors, Trends

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and Brookings Institution. 2013. Military children and families. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2 items. (The future of children; v. 23, no. 2, Fall 2013)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores subjects related to children and families of members of the U.S. military. Topics include economic conditions of families, children from birth through age 5, child care and other support programs, resilience among adolescents, how wartime military service affects children and families, how children are affected when a parent is injured or killed in combat, building communities of care, and recommendations for data and measurement. An executive summary and policy brief are also available.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anxiety, Children, Families, Family support services, Military, Parent child relations, Resilience, Socioeconomic factors

Mulrooney K, Williams DS. 2012. Increasing understanding of infants and young children in military families through focused research. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 7 pp. (CIR policy brief)

Annotation: This brief describes what is understood about the effects of multiple or prolonged combat deployments on military families, particularly the experiences and outcomes of school-aged children's health and well-being. Contents include sections on the exceptional nature of the very young child, understanding potential risks for child maltreatment, a review of the Research and Resilience Initiative, and recommendations for conducting future research on young children in military families.

Contact: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 1149 South Hill Street, Suite H-1114, Los Angeles, CA 90015, Telephone: (213) 821-3600 Fax: (213) 821-3601 E-mail: cir@usc.edu Web Site: http://cir.usc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Families, Maltreated children, Military, Research, School age children, Stress, Young children

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

Institute of Medicine. 2011. Informing the future: Critical issues in health. (6th ed.). Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 196 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about the work of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in selected, major areas in recent years. The main sections illustrate work that IOM committees have done in several topic areas, including quality of care, pharmaceuticals, children and adolescents, public health, active-duty military and veterans, global health, health research, and clinical medicine. Following is a description of IOM's convening and collaborative activities -- those cases in which IOM has brought people together to share ideas and discuss possible solutions. The last section provides a comprehensive bibliography of IOM reports published since 2007.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website after registration. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-21533-6.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, International health, Military, Prescription drugs, Public health, Research

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2011. Leading change: A plan for SAMHSA's roles and actions 2011-2014. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic initiatives that the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has identified to guide its work through 2014. For each initiative, background is presented, along with an issue statement and specific goals and objectives. The strategic initiatives discussed include: (1) prevention of substance abuse and mental illness; (2) trauma and justice; (3) military families; (4) health care reform implementation; (5) housing and homelessness; (6) heath information technology; (7) data, outcomes, and quality; and (8) public awareness and support.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge (hipping charges may apply); also available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health care reform, Homelessness, Housing, Information, Initiatives, Mental health, Military, Outcomes, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistical data, Strategic plans, Substance abuse, Trauma

Chandra A, Lara-Cinisomo S, Jaycox LH, Tanielian T, Han B, Burns RM, Ruder T. 2011. Views from the homefront: The experiences of youth and spouses from military families. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 96 pp. (Technical report)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to examine and assess how a sample of youth enrolled in a free camp for children of military personnel are coping with the deployment of their parents. The report addresses the general well-being of military youth during and after parental deployment, focusing attention on aspects of their emotional, social, and academic functioning. It also examines the challenges that nondeployed caregivers of military youth face. The study includes both qualitative and quantitative data collected from in-depth interviews with care givers and phone surveys with youth and nondeployed caregivers. Research, policy, and program implications are provided.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-5127-1.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child mental health, Families, Military, Reports, Sampling studies, Youth services

Richardson A, Chandra A, Martin LT, Setodji CM, Hallmark BW, Campbell NF, Hawkins SA, Grady P. 2011. Effects of soldiers' deployment on children's academic performance and behavioral health. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 146 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the association between parental deployment and student achievement scores among children in North Carolina and Washington between 2002 and 2008. It also presents findings from interviews conducted with teachers, counselors, and administrators from elementary, middle, and high school regarding how deployment of active duty, reserve, and national guard soldiers has affected children's academic and related behavioral and health outcomes. The report offers recommendations on how to better support these children.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-5181-3.

Keywords: Family support, Academic achievement, Child behavior, Child health, Children, Military, North Carolina, Parents, State surveys, Washington

U.S. Interagency Policy Committee. 2011. Strengthening our military families: Meeting America's commitment. [Washington, DC: White House], 23 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the commitment of federal agencies in response to President Barack Obama's directive to establish a coordinated and comprehensive federal approach to supporting U.S. military families. It describes the strategic priorities that address the primary challenges facing military families; identifies federal partnerships that expand capacity and quality of services provided to military families; discusses efforts to promote awareness of military families' needs; and demonstrates how innovation and the exchange of best practices can generate resources and reduce barriers. The report identifies four basic priorities: (1) enhance the overall well-being and psychological health of the military family; (2) ensure excellence in military children's education and their development; (3) develop career and educational opportunities for military spouses; and (4) increase childcare availability and quality within the armed forces.

Contact: U.S. Department of Defense, Military Community and Family Policy, Web Site: http://www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/MOS/f?p=MI:CONTENT2:0::::COHE:250644 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Families, Family support programs, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Military

National Military Family Association. 2011. Finding common ground: A toolkit for communities supporting military families. Alexandria, VA: National Military Family Association, 24 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides simple, cost-effective suggestions for how to support military families and ideas for how to start conversations and stimulate action. Sections of the toolkit are provided for individuals in various categories such as family, friends, and neighbors; health professionals, employers, philanthropic supporters, and others. The toolkit can be viewed in sections online, with related materials, or downloaded.

Contact: National Military Family Association, 3601 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 425, Alexandria, VA 22304, Telephone: (703) 931-6632 Secondary Telephone: (800) 260-0128 Fax: (703) 931-4600 E-mail: info@militaryfamily.org Web Site: http://www.militaryfamily.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Costs, Families, Family support, Military

Batuman F, Bean-Mayberry B, Goldzweig CL, Huang C, Miake-Lye IM, Washington DL, Yano EM, Zephyrin LC, Shekelle PG. 2011. Health effects of military service on women veterans. Los Angeles, CA: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research and Development Services, Evidence-Based Synthesis Program, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to explore women veterans' post-deployment health, with two main areas of concentration: (1) post-deployment effects on reproductive health for women veterans and (2) post-traumatic sequelae among women veterans for the Operation Enduring Freeom/Operation Iraqi Freedom cohorts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, Health Services Research and Development Service, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW (10P9H), Washington, DC 20420, Telephone: (202) 443-5733 Web Site: http://www.hsrd.research.va.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Military, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Reproductive health, Research, Women's health

Autel HR, Esqueda MC, Jacobson L. 2011. The military child within the public school education system. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 6 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief explores the support needs of military children facing transition, mobility, deployment, and trauma while attending public schools. Recommendations are discussed for addressing these challenges military children encounter in the school environment as well as impact aid, the Interstate Compact, Common Core Standards, sustaining data at state and national levels to identify military students and their respective needs, and funding School Liaison Officers.

Contact: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 1149 South Hill Street, Suite H-1114, Los Angeles, CA 90015, Telephone: (213) 821-3600 Fax: (213) 821-3601 E-mail: cir@usc.edu Web Site: http://cir.usc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family support services, Military, Psychosocial development, Public schools, School age children, School personnel, School role

University of Washington, Maternal and Child Public Health Leadership Training Program. [2010]. Military family health. Northwest Bulletin: Family and Child Health 24(2):1-20.,

Annotation: This issue of Northwest Bulletin: Family and Child Health focuses on the impact of deployment on children's mental health, and the services and programs available to support military families in the Northwest region of the United State (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington). Topics include strengthening the coping skills of children of military families, behavioral health resources available on military installations, removing barriers to education success among military children in schools, identifying risk behaviors for youth with parents in the military, service supports for military families, support for children with special developmental needs in the military health system, the maternal and child public health leadership training program, and other resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Washington, School of Public Health, Box 357230, Seattle, WA 98195-3813, Telephone: (206) 543-1144 Fax: (206) 543-3813 E-mail: publichealth@uw.edu Web Site: http://sph.washington.edu/index.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Children with special health care needs, Family health, MCH programs, Mental health services, Military, Northwestern United States

Frohnen BP, McManus MA, Limb SJ, Straus CR. 2010. Concern for our teens: Opinion leaders speak out on adolescent health. Washington, DC: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 12 pp. (Report; no. 4)

Annotation: This report presents findings from interviews conducted with opinion leaders from a cross section of businesses, colleges, and military branches to gain their perspectives on how well adolescents are doing in terms of their physical, mental, and emotional health. The report also discusses these opinion leaders' views on health education and wellness for adolescents and ways to create a culture of health.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescent health, Business, Colleges, Emotional development, Health education, Interviews, Mental health, Military, Public policy

Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and Vulcan Productions. 2010. A handbook for family and friends of service members: Before, during and after deployment. [Seattle, WA]: Vulcan Productions, 142 pp., 1 DVD (37 min.).

Annotation: This handbook explores the stressors and feelings individuals may encounter throughout the different phases of deployment. Created as a companion to the PBS series “This Emotional Life, ” the handbook aims to provide solutions for service members and identifies outside tools and resources that may be useful to friends and family members before, during, and after deployment. Each of these three segments explores topics related to relationships, self-care, communication and staying informed. Sample topics include: (1) what to expect during a deployment; (2); tools to keep your family and community strong throughout a deployment; (3) skills to strengthen or repair relationships; and (4) tools to create open lines of communication with a spouse, partner, and child. The handbook also includes checklists, reflection exercises, suggestions for family activities, and sample conversation topics.

Contact: Vulcan Productions, 505 Fifth Avenue, Suite 900, Seattle, WA 98104, Telephone: (206) 342-2000 E-mail: info@vulcanproductions.com Web Site: http://www.vulcanproductions.com Contact for availability and cost information.

Keywords: Emotional adjustment, Families, Family support programs, Manuals, Mental health, Military

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.