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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

Van Hook J, Landale NS, Hillemeier MH. 2013. Is the United States bad for children's health? Risk and resilience among young children of immigrants. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes current knowledge about the health of children of immigrants in the United States. The report provides an overview about children of immigrants of all national origins and then focuses on the largest group of children living in the United States today—the children of Mexican immigrants. Topics include the importance of childhood health and health disparities, health among children of immigrants:, and children of Mexican immigrants. For children of Mexican immigrants, the report focuses on asthma, obesity, and explaining poor health outcomes among this population.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Minority groups, Asthma, Obesity, Child health, Ethnic factors, Families, Immigrants, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, Racial factors

Law J. 2011. An unprecedented health challenge working with border communities. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Paso del Norte Health Foundation's (PDNHF's) work in promoting health and preventing disease in the Paso del Norte region (including far western Texas, southern New Mexico, and northern Chihuahua, Mexico). The fact sheet discusses the region's public health challenge that has arisen as a result of an upsurge in violent crime in the area. Stakeholders' perceptions and PDNHF's response are presented.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, Crime, Disease prevention, Education, Health promotion, Mental health, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, Mexico, New Mexico, Pubic health, Research, Texas, Violence prevention

National Population Council of Mexico, Health Initiative of the Americas, University of California, Berkeley. 2009. Migration and health: The children of Mexican immigrants in the U.S.. Berkeley, CA: Health Initiative of the Americas, University of California, Berkeley, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report constitutes a systematic comparison of children of Mexican immigrant families with native-born white children, African-American children, and the children of immigrants from other countries. The report (1) provides an overview of the general tendencies of children of Mexican immigrants in the United States, (2) analyzes the impact of socio-demographics of Mexican immigrant families on the health of their children, (3) discusses rates of use of medical and health services, and (4) discusses the state of health of children of Mexican immigrants in the United States. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Health Initiative of the Americas, University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 203, Berkeley, CA 94704, Telephone: (510) 643-1291 Fax: (510) 642-7861 E-mail: hia.isa@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://hia.berkeley.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 970-628-949-6.

Keywords: Child health, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Immigrants, Mexican Americans, Racial factors, Spanish language materials

Scott G, Simile C. 2005. Access to dental care among Hispanic or Latino subgroups: United States, 2000-03. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 15 pp. (Advance data from vital and health statistics; no. 354)

Annotation: This report presents national estimates of access to oral health care for the following five subgroups of Hispanic or Latino individuals in the United States: Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, and other Hispanic or Latino. Topics include utilizing oral health care services, meeting oral health needs that are unmet due to cost, and identifying and understanding subgroup differences. Statistical information is presented in charts, graphs, and tables throughout the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. no. (PHS) 2005-1250.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Costs, Cuban Americans, Dental care, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, Minority groups, National surveys, Oral health, Puerto Ricans, Statistics

Hummer RA, Hamilton ER, You XH, Padilla YC. 2005. Health status and health care among Mexican American children born to unmarried women. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 28 pp. (Working paper no. 05-14-FF)

Annotation: This paper describes a comparative analysis of Mexican-American children and children in other major race and ethnic groups at age 3, drawn from a national sample of births to unmarried women. The paper's main objective is to document Mexican-American health and health care outcomes in early childhood. The paper, which includes an abstract, presents a review of recent literature, data and methods, results, and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the report. References and endnotes are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Ethnic factors, MCH research, Mexican Americans, Racial factors, Single mothers, Young children

Kaye CI. [2003]. Reducing cultural barriers to the provision of genetic services in South Texas—Final report. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 38 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a project to improve access to and utilization of genetic services by Mexican Americans along the U.S.-Mexico border. The report includes an abstract, a discussion of the purpose of the project, the goals and objectives, the methodology, results/outcomes, a discussion, a summary, a list of publications and products, a discussion of dissemination of the results, and a discussion of future plans and follow-up. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. (Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Arizona, California, Cultural factors, Final reports, Genetic services, Health care utilization, Immigrants, Language barriers, Low income groups, MCH research, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, Mexico, New Mexico, Texas

Deinard A. 2002. Does Education Limit Lead Burden?: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 51 pp.

Annotation: Lead abatement is a costly and disruptive secondary prevention procedure that benefits only those who live in the abated home. Primary prevention interventions—which may be less expensive and reach more people—are necessary. This study assessed the efficacy of a community-based, intensive, culturally specific educational intervention for the primary prevention of lead burden. The study hypothesized that lead levels of children whose mothers received the intensive education will remain lower than those of children whose mothers receive basic education, and that mothers receiving the intervention will perform better on knowledge-based tests than will mothers who do not. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107491.

Keywords: American Indians, Asians-All others, Blacks, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infants, Lead Poisoning Prevention, Lead Poisoning Screening, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Parent Education, Parents, Peer Counseling, Preschool children, Research, Toddlers

Urdaneta ML, Livingston J, Aguilar MJ, Enciso V, Kaye CI. 2002. Understanding Mexican American cultural beliefs and traditional healing practices: A guide for genetic service providers on the U.S.-Mexico border. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pediatrics, 153 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended for use as an aid to help genetic service providers better understand their client populations and reduce barriers to the provision of genetic services. The guide is geared for health professionals both with and without experience caring for Mexican Americans. The guide is divided into eight main sections: (1) who are Mexican Americans, (2) cultural values and beliefs and their relationship to health behaviors, (3) what is curanderismo, (4) Mexican American folk beliefs regarding genetic and other conditions, (5) client perceptions of genetic services and barriers to care, (6) cultural competence and genetic practice, (7) tool kit, and (8) supplement. The guide also includes a bibliography. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 567-7000 Web Site: http://www.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Genetic services, Health behavior, Health personnel, Hispanics, MCH research, Mexican Americans, Resource materials

Telleen S. 2001. Use of Child Health Services by Hispanic Families: [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, 59 pp.

Annotation: This study examined the influence of social context and acculturation on use of health services for preschool Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children in a major Midwestern city. Questions about health practices and service utilization were based on "Healthy People 2000" objectives for Hispanic children, including improving nutrition and reducing asthma morbidity; dental caries; high lead levels; and injuries/deaths from firearms, child abuse, motor vehicle crashes, and residential fires. The influence of health service availability, provider outreach, and mediating variables (e.g., knowledge of health services/practices, parental beliefs/attitudes, sense of control over their children's health) were examined. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106924.

Keywords: Access to Health, Care, Cultural Sensitivity, Hispanics, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Urdaneta ML, Aguilar M, Livingston J, Gonzales-Bogran S, Kaye CI. 2001. Understanding Mexican American cultural beliefs and traditional healing practices: A guide for genetic service providers in South Texas. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pediatrics, 115 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is intended to help reduce cultural barriers to the provision of genetic services in South Texas, includes information from interviews with Mexican-American Medicaid clients, traditional healers, and genetic services providers, as well as information from the literature. The guide is divided into eight main sections: (1) who are Mexican Americans, (2) cultural values and beliefs and their relationship to health behaviors, (3) what is curanderismo, (4) Mexican American folk beliefs regarding genetic and other conditions, (5) cultural competence and genetic practice, (6) barriers to obtaining genetic services, and (7) other cultural beliefs regarding health and illness. A tool kit at the end of the guide contains supplemental information and resources. The guide also includes a bibliography. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 567-7000 Web Site: http://www.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Folk medicine, Genetic services, Hispanics, MCH research, Medicaid, Mexican Americans, Resource materials, Texas

Lewit EM, Kerrebrock N. 1998. Child indicators: Dental health. The Future of Children 8(1):133-142, (The future of children; v. 8, no. 1, Spring 1998)

Annotation: This issue reviews several measures of oral health in children and presents data on children's dental health. Data are presented by age groups and in time frames. The issue also discusses the utilization of oral health services in various ethnic groups and low income populations.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Child health, Children, Dentists, EPSDT, Families, Low income groups, Medicaid, Mexican Americans, Oral health, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites

Korenbrot C. 1998. Indicators of Maternity Care in Medicaid Managed Care: [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, 51 pp.

Annotation: This research study aimed to: 1) develop potential indicators for maternity ambulatory care, incorporating the role of nutrition, psychosocial, and health education services; 2) test the validity of the indicators for their associations with poor health outcomes and their ability to predict poor health outcomes; and 3) test whether the indicators vary for women, with respect to different provider settings for prenatal care and different payer sources of care. An expert panel developed indicators and rated the variables proposed as indicators or risk adjusters. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-145666.

Keywords: Blacks, Enabling Services, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Low Income Population, MCH Research, Medicaid Managed Care, Pregnant women (not otherwise defined as adolescents), Prenatal Care, Research

Wilk VA. 1994. Farmworker women speak out: Priorities and policy recommendations to improve the lives of farmworker families. Washington, DC: Farmworker Justice Fund, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report traces the development of the Farmworker Women's Health Project in 1991. It focuses on the founding conference, the first meeting of the steering committee, and two subsequent conferences that focused on farmworker women and AIDS. The report describes events at each of the meetings that contributed to the formulation of the policy recommendations contained in the report. These recommendations cover specific health issues that are important to farmworker women such as AIDS, health, housing, exposure to pesticides, and wages and working conditions. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Farmworker Justice Fund, 1126 16th Street NW, Suite 270, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 293-5420 Fax: (202) 293-5427 Web Site: http://www.fwjustice.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Asian Americans, Blacks, Conferences, Employment, Farm workers, Housing, Mexican Americans, Migrants, Policy development, Public health, Puerto Ricans, Women, Women's health

Arcia E, Keyes L, Gallagher JJ, Chabhar M. 1993. Status of young Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children: Implications for early intervention systems. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Institute for Child and Family Policy, Carolina Policy Studies Program, 30 pp.

Annotation: According to the authors, concern about the delivery of services to culturally diverse groups seldom goes beyond the general recognition that such groups are different from mainstream, middle-class families. The notion that there are significant differences between various culturally diverse groups rarely becomes part of the professional discussion or professional planning. This report compares two such groups from the Hispanic community. It points out some major differences in the families and children comprising these groups and the implications of those differences for early intervention systems. For example, the report points out that the same prevalence of problems cannot automatically be expected for every group or subgroup. A table summarizing the results of the study, probable consequences, and policy implications is provided.

Contact: Carolina Institute for Child and Family Policy, Carolina Policy Studies Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 300 NationsBank Plaza, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 962-7374 Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural barriers, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Family centered services, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans

Vasser RE. 1980. Community Health Assistance Project of the Barrio Comprehensive Child Health Care Center: Final report. Austin, TX: Texas Department of Human Resources, 1 v. (Hiscock Collection; no. 87)

Annotation: This report describes a project to assist a Mexican-American neighborhood health clinic in providing community outreach, follow-up, and health education services to low-income clients in a Mexican-American neighborhood on the west side of San Antonio, Texas. Appendix B is lacking in the library copy.

Keywords: EPSDT, Mexican Americans, State programs, Texas

Trevino FM, ed. Hispanic health and nutrition: Examination survey, 1982-1984—Findings on health status and health care needs. American Journal of Public Health 80(Supplement):1-72. December 1990.,

Annotation: This special supplement to the "American Journal of Public Health" highlights findings of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1982-84. The health status and health care need data on Hispanics can provide useful information to school administrators, health care providers, and health educators working with Hispanic school-aged children in understanding acculturation, use of preventive health services, health-risk behaviors, alcohol consumption and drug use, and dental health.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $10.00 plus $3.00 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cuban Americans, Data, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Injury prevention, Mexican Americans, National surveys, Puerto Ricans, Substance abuse

American Medical Association. [Special issue on Hispanic health issues]. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association. 265(2):174-257. January 9, 1991.,

Annotation: This journal issue is primarily dedicated to Hispanic health issues and includes articles on measures of health status, health insurance coverage, and health services utilization. Also included are commentaries, editorials and an AMA Council on Scientific Affairs report on Hispanic health in the United States.

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org Back issues of the journal are available at no charge, as long as copies are available.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cuban Americans, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, National surveys, Puerto Ricans

Williams N, ed. Cultural diversity in American family life. Journal of Family Issues. 16(32):243-405. May 1995,

Annotation: This special issue of the "Journal of Family Issues" is dedicated to the role of family relations within the context of cultural diversity based on racial and ethnic differences. It includes empirical and theoretical articles. Topics covered include family life and racial and ethnic diversity; social support systems for employed African Americans and Anglo-Americans; differences between rural and urban family structures for African Americans; the timing of marriages among Chinese and Japanese Americans; the patterns of care for elderly Mexican Americans; the roles of race, ethnicity, and gender in the perceptions of fairness; and the relationships between the assimilation model, family life, and race and ethnicity and how these relationships affect the care of minority welfare mothers.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com $15.00; discounts available for bulk orders; prepayment required for orders under $25.00.

Keywords: Asian Americans, Blacks, Cultural diversity, Elder care, Employment, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Family life, Family relations, Family relations, Marriage, Mexican Americans, Moral values, Mothers, Racial factors, Rural population, Sex role, Social values, Urban population, Welfare services, Whites, Women

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.