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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (25 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. Pathways to family leadership within AMCHP. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document defines the term "family leader" and describes the roles for family leaders in the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs' activities. Topics include title, eligibility criteria, selection process, timeline, and duties.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Contact Phone: (202) 775-1472 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Contact E-mail: mjarvix@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Teaching, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Volunteers, Work force

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. 2016. A framework for educating health professionals to address the social determinants of health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 170 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a framework for educating health professionals to address the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, as well as the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life including economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. Contents include theoretical constructs and examples of programs and frameworks addressing elements of the social determinants of health. The framework aligns education, health, and other sectors to meet local needs in partnership with communities.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Continuing education, Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Health occupations, Inclusive schools, Mentors, Model programs, Models, Professional education, Public health education, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Training, Work force

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, MCH Training Program. 2016. Diversity and cultural competency resources. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes federal activities and resources to support diversity and cultural competency within the maternal and child health (MCH) work force. Topics include agency-wide strategic planning to improve health equity; pipeline training program requirements for collecting data on the race and ethnicity of trainees and faculty and the degree to which programs have incorporated cultural and linguistic competence into policies, guidelines, contracts, and training; and resources to support programs in advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence such as technical assistance, peer mentoring, and collaboration.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Data collection, Ethnic groups, Goals, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Information dissemination, MCH training programs, Measures, Mentors, Peer groups, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Race, Technical assistance, Work force

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. 2016. Roles of family staff or consultants within Title V MCH and CYSHCN programs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses various roles, and activities within these roles, of families who are in paid positions as staff or consultants to state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs. Topics include roles for family engagement in the Title V Block Grant guidance; depth of engagement (family roles along a continuum); roles and activities by level of engagement (input, partnership, service provision, policy-level leadership); and family engagement in Title V needs assessment activities.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Needs assessment, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Training, Work force

Gray A, Duenas J, Watson JD. 2015. Project leadership: Effecting change, one parent at a time. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about a training curriculum to prepare families to build partnerships with professionals and engage in public policy advocacy on behalf of children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). Contents include background, methods, and lessons learned. Topics include the challenges in California for families of CYSHCN, benefits of family involvement, and barriers to greater family participation; project goals, implementation, staffing, recruitment and retention of families and other caregivers, scheduling, facilitation, and mentoring; and results, recommendations, and conclusion.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Barriers, California, Children, Families, Mentors, Parent education, Policy development, Program development, Special health care needs, Training, Young Adults

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Research and Evaluation. 2013. An evaluation of the diversity in MCH training: Peer Learning Collaborative. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Research and Evaluation, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings and recommendations from an evaluation of a peer learning collaborative to support existing maternal and child health (MCH) training program grantees in their efforts to increase racial and ethnic diversity of trainees and faculty. Contents include a description of the collaborative (eleven teams of program grantees and their institutional or community-based partners); the evaluation methodology; and findings on the overall benefits of the collaborative, challenges, the role of technical assistance, and sustainability. The appendices contain a list of webinars and trainings and the structured interview guide.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, MCH training programs, Mentors, Peer groups, Program evaluation, Technical assistance

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2012-. Mentoring: An evidence-based strategy to increase the number of students and faculty from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in maternal and child health training programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources related to efforts to increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups in all facets of the public health and maternal and child health (MCH) work force and to enhance the learning environment by ensuring cultural competence within all components of training programs. Specifically, the website focuses on mentoring as a strategy to support racially and ethnically diverse students and faculty who are underrepresented within MCH training programs. The site includes links to a review of peer-reviewed and gray literature, a summary of information from listening sessions with students and faculty, and a list of multi-institutional or national programs that support mentoring efforts.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Ethnic factors, MCH training, MCH training programs, Mentors, National programs, Programs, Public health, Racial factors, Research, Students, Training

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Bureau of Community and Environmental Health. 2010. Coaching youth to success: Healthy players make a winning team! A coach's handbook about common health and safety issues in youth. Boise, ID: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Bureau of Community and Environmental Health, 68 pp.

Annotation: This handbook provides health and safety information and tips for individuals who coach youth sports in Idaho. Topics include tobacco use prevention, asthma, sun safety, nutrition, diabetes, injury, and violence prevention. Contents include references, resources, and handouts.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Mentors, Physical activity, Prevention, Safety, Sports

Lombardo MM, Eichinger RW. 2009. For your improvement: A development and coaching guide—For: Learners, supervisors, managers, mentors, and feedback givers. (5th ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Lominger Limited, 580 pp.

Annotation: This book is intended to assist those individuals in leadership positions in the workplace to improve supervisory and mentoring skills. The book covers skills in three areas: core competencies, performance dimensions, and career stallers and stoppers. For each skill, the book presents characteristics of those who are unskilled, skilled, or who use the skill excessively; a list of causes of difficulties with that skill; and a list of 10 remedies for the difficulties. The introduction provides a general structure for working on any of the skills and the appendix contains personal development plan worksheets.

Keywords: Employee performance appraisal, Leadership training, Mentors, Personnel management, Planning, Resource materials, Staff development, Supervisors

Ogburn E, Roberts R, Pariseau C, Levitz B, Wagner B, Moss J, Adelmann B. 2006. Promising practices in family mentorship: A guidebook for MCHB-LEND Training Programs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 55 pp.

Annotation: This guidebook presents a family mentorship program model in which the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Leadership Education Excellence in Caring for Children with Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) proram trainees are matched with families who have a child or adolescent with disabilities or special health care needs. The guidebook presents a wide range of promising practices for any family mentorship program. The guidebook is organized into chapters on the following topics: principles, developing the family coordinator position(s), identifying outcomes for trainees and families, design, recruiting and selecting families, orienting participants, matching trainees and families, ongoing coordination, and wrapping up. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Families, Federal programs, Mentors, Service coordination, Training

Herrera C, Vang Z, Gale LY. 2002. Group mentoring: A study of mentoring groups in three programs. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures, 62 pp.

Annotation: The report, prepared for the National Mentoring Partnerships Public Policy Council (NMPPPC), examines three group mentoring programs in Kansas City, Missouri; Los Angeles, California; and Erie County, New York. This report describes study findings on the extent to which significant relationships develop in these groups and the potential benefits of participation. The report defines group mentoring (a group or team, ranging from 2 to 32 youths, with at least two mentors per team, in various settings, such as schools or faith-based organizations, engaging in activities outside the home), and mentor-youth relationships in the group settings. It includes an executive summary, conclusions, references, and appendices on the NMPPPC and the study methodology. Extensive tables, figures, and boxes offer program descriptions and statistical information.

Contact: Public/Private Ventures, 2000 Market Street, Suite 600, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 557-4400 Secondary Telephone: (215) 557-4411 Fax: (215) 557-4469 E-mail: publications@ppv.org Web Site: http://www.ppv.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Community programs, Low income groups, Mentors, Missouri, New York, Program descriptions, Support groups, Youth development

Burns B, Hoagwood K. 2002. Community treatment for youth: Evidence-based interventions for severe emotional and behavioral disorders. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 390 pp. (Innovations in practice and service delivery with vulnerable populations)

Annotation: This book discusses evidence-based interventions for children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. It is divided into four parts: (1) context; (2) comprehensive interventions; (3) targeted interventions in education, substance abuse, and mental health, and (4) conclusion and commentary. Topics include case management, multisystemic therapy, mentoring, family support and education, special education best practices, and policy implications. One chapter provides an annotated review of psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions in table format focussing on four common childhood disorders or related symptom patterns. References, information about the contributors, and an index conclude this book.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-513457-5.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Community mental health centers, Family support services, Mentors, Psychosocial development, Special education, Youth development

Dean C. 2002. Healthy Start impact report: Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start. Sikeston, MO: [Missouri] Bootheel Healthy Start, 73 pp.

Annotation: This impact report describes the Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start Initiative during the period September 1, 1997, through June 30, 2001. The project worked to develop a rural, decentralized perinatal education model that that educated women in a style of learning conducive to the project area and mobilized the community to work on infant health issues. Topics covered include (1) service initiation, (2) service accomplishments, (3) mentoring, (4) consortium and collaboration, (5) consortium program impact, and (6) other Healthy Start components. The report includes these attachments: (1) an implementation plan presented in tabular form, (2) a Healthy Start participant data table, (3) a Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start major services table, (4) Healthy Start performance measures, and (5) a project area demographic and statistical data form. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Bootheel Healthy Start, 127 East Malone, PO Box 1369, Sikeston, MO 63801, Telephone: (573) 472-4949 Secondary Telephone: (888) 317-4949 Fax: (573) 472-4955 E-mail: info@mbrcinc.org Web Site: https://www.mbrcinc.org/pages.aspx?PageID=1

Keywords: Collaboration, Final reports, Health education, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Mentors, Missouri, Perinatal care, Prevention programs, Rural communities, State initiatives

Wynn J. 2002. Chicago Healthy Start impact report: Peer monitoring replication phase. Chicago, IL: Illinois Department of Human Services, 70 pp.

Annotation: This impact report describes the Chicago Healthy Start Program, which administers the Chicago Healthy Start Family Centers, a collaborative effort between a community-based case management and social services agency and a primary health care center. The project period was from October 1, 1997, through May 31, 2001. Topics covered include (1) service initiation, (2) service accomplishments, (3) mentoring, (4) consortium and collaboration, and (5) other Healthy Start components. A local evaluation is included. The report includes five attachments: (1) service accomplishments presented in tabular form, (2) a brief overview of the program and primary findings, (3) an open house evaluation form, (4) a project area consortium roster, and (5) a table listing the status of hospital contacts for the fetal infant mortality review project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Families, Final reports, Healthy Start, Illinois, Infant Health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Mentors, Prevention programs, State initiatives

Ross-Ratney RL. 2002. Impact summary report: Northwest Indiana Healthy Start. Hammond, IN: Northwest Indiana Healthy Start, 1 v.

Annotation: This impact report, submitted on October 2, 2002, describes the Northwest Indiana Healthy Start project. Topics discussed include service initiation, case management, mentoring, consortium and collaboration, consortium program impact, and other Healthy Start components. The report includes one attachment: a budget period objective and implementation plan presented in tabular form. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: NorthWest Indiana Healthy Start, 7854 Interstate Plaza Drive, Hammond, IN 46324, Telephone: (219) 989-3939 Secondary Telephone: (800) 445-2229 E-mail: lhatch@nwihs.com Web Site: http://nwihs.com/index.html

Keywords: Collaboration, Final reports, Healthy Start, Indiana, Infant Health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Mentors, Prevention programs, Recruitment, State initiatives

Lightsey D, Vandenberg G, Montes E, de la Cruz D. 1999. The Healthy Start initiative: A community-driven approach to infant mortality reduction—Volume VI: Replicating the Healthy Start models of intervention. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 92 pp. (The Healthy Start initiative: A community-driven approach to infant mortality reduction)

Annotation: This report presents lessons learned from Healthy Start grantees as they planned and implemented the Healthy Start Initiative, a five-year demonstration program that uses a community-driven, systems development approach to reduce infant mortality and improve the health and well-being of women, infants, children, and families. This volume focuses on replicating the Healthy Start models. Those are (1) community-based consortia, (2) outreach and client recruitment, (3) case coordination/case management, (4) family resource centers, (5) enhanced clinical services, (6) risk prevention and reduction, (7) facilitating services, (8) training and education, and (9) adolescent programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health, Case management, Case studies, Clinics, Community programs, Demonstration programs, Family resource centers, Grants, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Mentors, Model programs, Outreach, Perinatal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Risk factors

McLearn KT, Colassanto D, Schoen C. 1998. Mentoring makes a difference: Findings from The Commonwealth Fund 1998 Survey of Adults Mentoring Young People. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document reports the findings of a national telephone survey of 1, 504 adults who have been mentors to youths ages 10 to 18 during the past five years. The findings discuss the success of mentoring in reaching high-risk adolescents, the difficult circumstances often found in adolescents in mentoring relationships, the rewards of mentoring, how prevalent mentoring is and who is most likely to mentor, factors that improve success in mentoring relationships, types of programs, types of sponsors, and supports for mentors. Implications of the survey findings are discussed in conclusion. The survey methodology is also explained. The appendices provide related charts and statistics.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Contact Phone: (800) 777-2744 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, High risk adolescents, Mentors, Reports, Research methodology, Statistics, Surveys

Saunders SE. 1998. Chicago Healthy Start impact report: Phase I. Chicago, IL: Office of Family Health, Illinois Department of Human Services, 305 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This impact report describes the Chicago Healthy Start Program, which administers the Chicago Healthy Start Family Centers, a collaborative effort between a community-based case management and social services agency and a primary health care center. The project period was 1994 -- 1997. Topics covered include (1) service initiation, (2) service accomplishments, (3) mentoring, (4) consortium and collaboration, and (5) other Healthy Start components. A local evaluation is included. The report includes five attachments: (1) service accomplishments presented in tabular form, (2) a brief overview of the program and primary findings, (3) an open house evaluation form, (4) a project area consortium roster, and (5) a table listing the status of hospital contacts for the fetal infant mortality review project. Appendices include several evaluation reports. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Illinois Department of Human Services, 100 S. Grand Avenue, E., Springfield, IL 62762, Telephone: (800) 843-6154 Secondary Telephone: (800) 804-3833 Web Site: http://www.dhs.state.il.us

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Families, Final reports, Healthy Start, Illinois, Infant Health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Mentors, Prevention programs, State initiatives

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1997. The road to replication: Telling the Healthy Start story—Healthy Start annual continuing education meeting. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 125 pp.

Annotation: This notebook contains the materials from the Healthy Start 1997 annual continuing education meeting, The Road to Replication: Telling the Healthy Start Story, held in Bethesda, Maryland. The binder contains: the meeting agenda; a section on mentoring; the October 1997 edition of MCH Program Interchange, a periodic publication that lists current literature for the Title V community, the topic of which is Focus on Mentoring Tools from the Healthy Start Initiative; Healthy Start project contact information and a list of meeting participants and their contact information. The notebook includes a glossary of mentoring terms and references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Conferences, Continuing education, Federal MCH programs, Healthy Start, Mentors, Professional education

Tierney JP, Grossman JB, Resch NL. 1995. Making a difference: An impact study of Big Brothers/Big Sisters. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures, 87 pp.

Annotation: This report is the centerpiece of an eight year research initiative to study mentoring and to explore the policy and operational implications of creating adult mentoring relationships for at-risk youth. A focus of the initiative was a case study of California's Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentoring program. Following an introduction describing the background of the study, Chapter 2 lays out in detail the infrastructure and standards in the BB/BS program. Chapter 3 describes the design of the evaluation. Chapter 4 describes the characteristics of youth who participated in the study. Chapter 5 then presents the evidence on how youth who participated in a BB/BS program differed, 18 months later, from similar youth assigned to a control group. The final chapter summarizes the positive impacts of BB/BS on youth, and then draws policy implications for and about mentoring programs. A bibliography is included at the end of the report.

Contact: Public/Private Ventures, 2000 Market Street, Suite 600, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 557-4400 Secondary Telephone: (215) 557-4411 Fax: (215) 557-4469 E-mail: publications@ppv.org Web Site: http://www.ppv.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Case studies, Counselors, Data, High risk adolescents, Mentors, Research design, Research methodologies, Surveys, Volunteers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.