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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

John Snow, Inc. 2016. Fostering effective integration of behavioral health and primary care in Massachusetts: Year 1 report. Boston, MA: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the activities of 10 primary care and behavioral health organizations with established integration programs in Massachusetts to identify success factors, barriers, challenges, and opportunities for change. Contents include a description of grantee organizations followed by a description of findings related to how they defined success for their integration efforts, perceptions of the critical components of integrated programs, common barriers to integration, and measures used to assess programs. The evaluation framework, a list of the process and outcome data elements collected by grantees, and grantee profiles are appended.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Data collection, Demonstration grants, Evaluation methods, Health care delivery, Massachusetts, Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Primary care, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

Building Bridges Initiative. 2014. Supporting siblings when a brother or sister is receiving residential interventions: Key issues and tips for providers and families. [no place]: Building Bridges Initiative, 11 pp. (A Building Bridges Initiative tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet provides an overview of key issues and tips for supporting siblings when a brother or sister is receiving residential interventions for behavioral and/or emotional challenges. Contents include background on why it is important to support siblings and strategies for families and other caregivers.

Contact: Building Bridges Initiative, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, E-mail: gary.blau@samhsa.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.buildingbridges4youth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Family centered services, Family support programs, Mental health, Residential care, Siblings

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 10 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect. The fact sheet covers (1) factors affecting the consequences of child abuse and neglect, (2) physical health consequences, (3) psychological consequences, (4) behavioral consequences, and (5) societal consequences. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Mental disorder, Mental health, Spanish language materials

Allen KD, Hendricks T. 2013. Medicaid and children in foster care. Washington DC: First Focus, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the health care needs of children in foster care and the role of Medicaid in providing health coverage for this population. The brief also highlights existing policy levers that may help address some of the health and well-being issues that children in foster care face.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Emotional instability, Foster care, Foster children, Health care systems, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Public policy

American Academy of Pediatrics, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. 2013. Trauma guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; [Columbus, OH]: Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, 4 items.

Annotation: These materials for pediatricians provide information on how to support adoptive and foster families who have experienced trauma. The materials include a guide focused on how to help families cope with trauma, a tip sheet about codes to use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health and developmental concerns, a discharge form and referral summary, and a guide for families about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Parenting skills, Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Developmental problems, Families, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Pediatricians, Referrals, Resource materials, Trauma

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Marshall N. 2013. Integrating behavioral health and primary care for children and youth: Concepts and strategies. Washington, DC: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This paper outlines different models for organizing the delivery of services for children with behavioral health needs, describes five core competencies of the integrated care systems for children with behavioral health issues, and describes financing mechanisms that can be used to support the approach of integrated care systems for children with behavioral health conditions. Topics include the unmet needs in behavioral supports for children and youth, choosing a service delivery structure, core competencies, and financing integrated care systems. appendices include a chronic care model, a system care concept and philosophy, and additional resources.

Contact: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare, 1701 K Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006, E-mail: integration@thenational council.org Web Site: http://www.integration.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Children, Health care financing, Health services delivery, Mental health, Models, Service integration

University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence. 2012–. Blueprints for healthy youth development. Boulder, CO: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, multiple items.

Annotation: This registry provides information about evidence-based positive youth development programs designed to promote the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Contents include surveys for matching children's strengths and needs to specific programs based on outcome areas, risk and protective factors, and developmental stage; the program review criteria fact sheet, checklist, and standard; a searchable database that provides each program's name, target population, financing strategies, rating (promising or model program), benefits and costs, impact, and summary; instructions for nominating a program; related publications; and other resources.

Contact: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, 483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-4083, Telephone: (303) 492-1032 Fax: (303) 492-2151 E-mail: blueprints@colorado.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Certification, Child development, Children, Databases, Developmental stages, Health promotion, Information sources, Mental health, Model programs, Needs assessment, Prevention programs, Program planning, Protective factors, Registries, Research, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Surveys, Violence prevention

Allen KD, Pires SA, Mahadevan R. 2012. Improving outcomes for children in child welfare: A Medicaid managed care toolkit. [Hamilton, NJ]: Center for Health Care Strategies, 49 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes the efforts of the nine Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) that participated in Improving Outcomes for Children Involved in Child Welfare: A CHCS Quality Improvement Collaborative, designed by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The toolkit includes a project overview, an overview and description of the impact of the MCOs' initiatives, and discussions of care coordination and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Ethnic factors, Foster care, Foster children, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Programs, Racial factors

Citizens' Committee for Children of New York. 2012. New York City's children and mental health: Prevalence and gap analysis of treatment slot capacity. New York, NY: Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from a study to assess the gap between the need for mental health treatment slots and the number of treatment slots available for children and adolescents throughout New York City. The report discusses the methodology and presents key findings on child and adolescent mental health needs in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island and key findings on capacity and gap analysis. Appendix G of the report, a PowerPoint presentation, is presented in a separate document.

Contact: Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 673-1800 Fax: (212) 979-5063 E-mail: info@cccnewyork.org Web Site: http://www.cccnewyork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health insurance, Low income groups, Managed care, Medicaid, Mental health problems, New York, Research, Statistical data, Treatment, Uninsured persons

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Community Circle of Care [Iowa]. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about Community Circle of Care, a regional systems of care site comprising a coordinated network of community-based services and supports that is organized to meet the challenges of children and adolescents with serious mental problems and disorders and their families. The fact sheet discusses the following topics: demographics; referral, diagnosis, and family history; reduction in out-of-home placements; improvement in behavior problems; and improvement in caregiver strain. Brief stories told from the points of view of adolescents who have benefited from Community of Care are also included. The service area of this project was 10 counties in northeast Iowa.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mental health, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child mental health, Community services, Diagnosis, Families, Family support services, Mental disorders, Program coordination, Programs, Referral, Service coordination, State initiatives

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2012. Establishing a level foundation for life: Mental health begins in early childhood. (Rev. ed.). Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 12 pp. (Working paper no. 6)

Annotation: This working paper focuses on how experiences in early childhood can affect mental health and on the significance of emotional and behavioral difficulties that emerge during a child's early years. The paper discusses scientific evidence related to mental health and early childhood experiences, addressing common misconceptions, the science-policy gap, and implication for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Intervention, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Treatment, Young children

Bertrand M, Pan J. 2011. The trouble with boys: Social influences and the gender gap in disruptive behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17541)

Annotation: This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. The authors discuss data used, what drives the gender gap in non-cognitive skills, and why boys raised by single mothers are particularly at risk.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Families, Female children, Income factors, Low income groups, Male children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Research, School role, Single mothers

Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center. 2010. Children’s emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being: New data and tools for the field. [Washington, DC]: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, (Dataspeak)

Annotation: In this Webcast focusing on children's emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being, Dr Rheem Ghandour, a public health analyst from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, discusses the prevalence of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions at the national and state levels. Dr. James Perrin, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy at Mass General Hospital for Children, discusses evidence of the increasing rates of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions among children, with a focus on autism. Finally, Dr. Jane Foy, professor of pediatrics for Wake Forest University School of Medicine and chairperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Mental Health, discusses the role that the public health community plays in addressing pediatric mental illness and provides resources that the task force developed. Presenter information, an agenda, resources, and a program archive are available.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, Altarum Institute, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 842-2000 Fax: (202) 728-9469 E-mail: mchirc@altarum.org Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/researchdata/mchirc Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Behavior problems, Child development, Child health, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Multimedia, Public health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2010. The mental and emotional well-being of children: A portrait of states and the nation 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 60 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents a range of indicators on the health and well-being of children who have been diagnosed with emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions on the national level. For each state, the book shows the prevalence of seven conditions (grouped together) and the major demographic characteristics of children who have at least one of the conditions. The analyses delineate relationships among the conditions, children's socioeconomic characteristics, and access to health care. Technical appendices at the end of the book present information about the survey methodology, sample, and questions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00318.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Developmental disabilities, National surveys, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2010. Persistent fear and anxiety can affect young children's early learning and development. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 13 pp. (Working paper no. 9)

Annotation: This working paper focuses on how early exposure to circumstances that produce persistent fear and chronic anxiety can have lifelong consequences by disrupting the architecture of the brain and on how to implement interventions to prevent and treat the harmful effects of exposure to extreme, fear-eliciting circumstances. The paper discusses what science tells us, correcting popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and policy implications.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Anxiety, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Intervention, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Treatment, Young children

Iskason E, Higgins LB, Davidson LL, Cooper JL. 2009. Indicators for social-emotional development in early childhood: A guide for local stakeholders. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to give local stakeholders the information and tools necessary to develop and use indicators for social-emotional development. The report includes (1) definitions of key concepts related to establishing indicators; (2) seven recommended indicators for social-emotional development; (3) a framework to determine local priorities and get started with indicator adoption, (4) resources for finding data at the community level for each indicator, and (5) how to interpret and use data collected for each of the suggested indicators. Examples of successful use of these indicators in states and local communities are provided.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Depression, Emotional development, Mental disorders, Social indicators, Statistical data, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.