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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (194 total).

Susin J, Kaplan L. n.d.. "Breaking the Silence" tool kit: A how-to guide to bring mental illness education to schools in your community—A school outreach project. (Rev. ed.). Lake Success, NY: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 46 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit, geared toward program facilitators and volunteer educators, provides methods for bringing the Breaking the Silence program to communities. The purpose of the program is to break the silence about mental illness in schools. The toolkit provides a background on Breaking the Silence, the rationale for mental illness education, information about how to organize and fund a local program, how to enlist and train volunteers, and materials documenting the success of Breaking the Silence. The program is intended for use in upper elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.

Contact: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 1981 Marcus Avenue, C-117, Lake Success, NY 11042, Telephone: (516) 326-0797 Secondary Telephone: (718) 347-7284 Fax: (516) 437-5785 E-mail: namiqn@aol.com Web Site: http://www.nami.org/MSTemplate.cfm?MicrositeID=241 Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Communities, Health education, Mental disorders, Mental health, Resource materials, Schools, Training

Postpartum Progress. n.d.. Clinical tools for postpartum depression. [no place]: Postpartum Progress, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for clinicians involved in the care of pregnant and postpartum women include position papers, algorithms, toolkits, guidelines for treatment, screening tools, research on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, professional organizations, training and continuing education, books, and other resources. Information and peer support for pregnant and new moms with postpartum depression and other mental illnesses related to pregnancy and childbirth are also available from the website.

Contact: Postpartum Progress, E-mail: postpartumprogress@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.postpartumprogress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Mental disorders, Mental health, Perinatal bereavement, Perinatal health, Perinatal influences, Postpartum care, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Puerperal disorders, Resources for professionals, Women's health

John Snow, Inc. 2016. Fostering effective integration of behavioral health and primary care in Massachusetts: Year 1 report. Boston, MA: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the activities of 10 primary care and behavioral health organizations with established integration programs in Massachusetts to identify success factors, barriers, challenges, and opportunities for change. Contents include a description of grantee organizations followed by a description of findings related to how they defined success for their integration efforts, perceptions of the critical components of integrated programs, common barriers to integration, and measures used to assess programs. The evaluation framework, a list of the process and outcome data elements collected by grantees, and grantee profiles are appended.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Data collection, Demonstration grants, Evaluation methods, Health care delivery, Massachusetts, Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Primary care, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Kallal J, Walker J, Conlan Lewis L, Simons D, Lipper J, Pires S. 2014. Becoming a Medicaid provider of family and youth peer support: Considerations for family run organizations. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 23 pp.

Annotation: This resource provides guidance to organizations on becoming a Medicaid provider of family and youth peer support. The resource focuses primarily on organizations operated by parents and caregivers of children, youth, and young adults affected by serious emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Examples from three states (Arizona, Maryland, and Rhode Island) illustrate key aspects of the decision and process in becoming a Medicaid provider. Topics include the potential impact on the organization's mission, funding, service delivery environment, and advocacy role; how the structure and requirements of a state's Medicaid program may impact the delivery of services; working with state and local governments and provider systems; staffing considerations; and billing and rate-setting processes.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Decision making, Emotional disorders, Family support services, Health services delivery, Medicaid, Mental health, Public private partnerships, State programs, Young adults

Soni A. 2014. The five most costly children's conditions, 2011: Estimates for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized children, ages 0-17. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp. (MEPS statistical brief; no. 434)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey on medical expenditures associated with the five most costly conditions for children ages 0–17 in 2011. Topics include mental disorders, asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma-related disorders, acute bronchitis and upper respiratory infections, and otitis media.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Asthma, Bronchitis, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Infants, Mental disorders, Otitis media, Pediatric care, Pulmonary disorders, Respiratory diseases, Statistics, Trauma

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Serious mental health challenges among older adolescents and young adults. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 14 pp. (The CBHSQ report)

Annotation: This report focuses on mental health problems, co-occurring mental health problems and substance use disorder, and mental health service use among older adolescents ages 16-17 and young adults ages 18 to 25. The report provides a snapshot of mental health issues among older adolescents and young adults overall and by key issues for the transition into adulthood such as housing, employment, education, and insurance coverage.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Comorbidity, Health care utilization, Mental health, School to work transition, Substance use disorders, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Mathis J, Lilly B, Alfano E, Bernstein R. 2014. Making the connection: Meeting requirements to enroll people with mental illnesses in healthcare coverage. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 29 pp.

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Boyce S, Krivelyova A, Walrath C. 2014. Return on investment in systems of care for children with behavioral health challenges. Washington, DC: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 64 pp.

Annotation: This report documents what is known to date about the return on investment, specifically cost savings, from the systems of care approach to funding services for children and youth who have serious mental health conditions. It includes findings from national, multi-site, and individual state and community evaluations.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Cost effectiveness, Health care financing, Health care systems, Mental disorders

Abram KM, Choe JY, Washburn JJ, Teplin LA, King DC, Dulcan MK, Bassett ED. 2014. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors among detained youth. U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 11 pp. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin )

Annotation: This bulletin examines suicidal thoughts and behaviors among 1,829 children and adolescents (ages 10 to 18) in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal study of children and adolescents detained at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago, IL. Contents include a description of the study literature review and methods, and a discussion of the findings. Topics include hopelessness, thoughts about death and dying, thoughts about suicide, suicide plan, telling someone about suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorders that may increase the odds of suicide attempts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attempted suicide, Children, Juvenile justice, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychiatric disorders, Risk factors, Self destructive behavior, Statistical analysis

Murphey D, Barry M, Vaughn B. 2013. Mental health disorders. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of mental health disorders with an emphasis on adolescent health. It describes the types of mental disorders; explains which types are most common among adolescents; and discusses risky behavior and other consequences associated with mental health disorders in youth. The paper also looks at variations in the risk of mental disorders across gender, socioeconomic status, and other variables; discusses forms of treatment and barriers to care; and describes strategies and approaches to help reduce mental disorders among adolescents.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-01.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescent mental health, High risk adolescents, Mental disorders, Treatment

U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 2013. Prevention and early identification of mental health and substance use conditions. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 12 pp. (CMCS informational bulletin)

Annotation: This information bulletin is intended to inform states about resources available to help them meet the needs of children under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment Program (EPSDT), specifically with respect to mental health and substance-use-disorder services. The bulletin provides information about mental illness in children and discusses screening, clinical guidelines, professional development and training, clinical quality reporting, and state initiatives.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child mental health, Diagnosis, Intervention, EPSDT, Guidelines, Health services, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Resource materials, Screening, State programs, Substance abuse, Training, Treatment

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Mental health surveillance among children--United States, 2005-2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 62(Suppl. 2):1-35,

Annotation: This report describes federal surveillance systems, surveys, and other information systems that measure prevalence of mental disorders and indicators of mental health among children in the United States and highlights selected national prevalence estimates. Topics include mental disorders (attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, autism spectrum disorders, mood and anxiety disorders), substance use disorders and substance use, and tic disorders (Tourette syndrome). Selected indicators of mental health, including mentally unhealthy days and suicide, are also assessed. Availability of state-based estimates is noted in the surveillance descriptions and tables.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain diseases, Children, Data, Information systems, Mental disorders, Mental health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Substance use, Surveys

Center for Health Care Strategies. 2013. Family and youth peer support literature review. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes research on peer support for children and adolescents with significant mental health challenges, physical health challenges, or both. Topics include the benefits of family and youth peer support (FYPS), increased use of FYPS, families' roles, work force and sustainability, and areas needing further research.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Family support services, Health services delivery, Literature reviews, Mental disorders, Peer support services, Physical disabilities, Special health care needs

Special Care Advocates in Dentistry. 2013. SAID professional modules. [no place]: Special Care Advocates in Dentistry, multiple items.

Annotation: This series of 15 modules is designed to help oral health professionals meet their clients’ special needs. Topics include intellectual disability; clinical concerns related to providing oral health care for clients with intellectual disability; Down syndrome; cerebral palsy; using sedation, dental restraints and positioning devices, and general anesthesia; oral manifestations in genetic syndromes; providing oral health care for people with mental illness in institutional and outpatient settings; treatment planning; preventive dentistry; providing services to people with disabilities who reside in the community; administrative issues in the practice of dentistry in institutional settings; and research needs and opportunities.

Contact: Special Care Advocates in Dentistry, Southern Association of Institutional Dentists, Web Site: http://saiddent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Cerebral palsy, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Down syndrome, Health care delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Mental disorders, Multidisciplinary teams, Oral health, Research, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.