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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

Partnership for Male Youth. n.d.. The Partnership for Male Youth: Health provider toolkit for adolescent and young adult males. Washington, DC: Partnership for Male Youth, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help health professionals address the unique health care needs of adolescents and young adult males (AYAs) ages 10 to 26. Contents include a checklist covering nine health domains; client interview questions and supporting materials for each domain including background information, practice tools, and references; and a video library containing presentations for continuing medical education and client education. Topics include healthy eating and physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, trauma, mental health, developmental disorders, sexual biologic basics, normal pubertal concerns and genital abnormalities, and labs and immunizations. A tutorial is also available.

Contact: Partnership for Male Youth, 900 Second Street, N.E., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20002, E-mail: barbour@partnershipformaleyouth.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipformaleyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Comprehensive health care, Continuing medical education, Evidence based health care, Health examinations, Immunizations, Interviews, Medical history taking, Men's health, Screening, Young adults

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

Adamo C. 2014. The reproductive and sexual health of young men of color [YMOC]: Redressing disparities and engaging YMOC in prevention. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, Young Men's Initiative, 4 pp. (The facts)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. HPV: Common infection. Common reality. Brochures. [Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention],

Annotation: This brochure for men and women focuses on genital human papillavirus (HPV). The brochure explains what HPV is, how it is contracted, how to prevent it, and its health consequences. The brochure also provides information about genital warts. The brochures is available in English, Korean, Vietnamese, and Tagalog. The brochure is also available in versions focusing on Native American and Alaska Native cultures.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Human papillomavirus, Men's health, Non English language materials, Prevention, Sexually transmitted disease, Women's health

One Key Question® Initiative. 2012. One Key Question® resources. Portland, OR: Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to support health care professionals and health center staff in addressing women's preventive, reproductive health needs by using One Key Question®, a pregnancy intention screening tool. Contents include an implementation manual and patient education resources (a poster, a brochure, and a video). The brochure and video are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: One Key Question® Initiative, Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health, P.O. Box 40472, Portland, OR 97240, Telephone: (503) 223-4510 E-mail: info@onekeyquestion.org Web Site: http://www.onekeyquestion.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Decision making, Family planning, Goals, Health education, Men's health, Non English language materials, Oregon, Preconception care, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reproductive health, Screening, State initiatives, Women's health, Young adults

CityMatCH. 2008. CityMatCH 2008: Promising practice compendium. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 207 pp.

Annotation: This compendium contains materials from the CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference held on September 20-23, 2008, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which was entitled A Life-course Perspective: Pathways for Improving Practice in Urban MCH. The compendium includes information from oral presentations on topics such as preventing infant mortality, family planning, weight, men in maternal and child health, preconception health, and adolescent health, among others. Poster presentations are also included.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Community programs, Conference proceedings, Family planning, Infant health, Infant mortality, Leadership, Men’s health, Obesity, Prevention, Women’s health

Sen G, Ostlin, P, George A. 2007. Unequal, unfair, ineffective and inefficient: Gender inequity in health—Why it exists and how we can change it. Bangalore, India: Indian Institute of Management Bangalore; Stockholm, Sweden: Karolinska Institutet , 127 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on gender inequities in health and how these inequities affect girls and women, as well as men. The report discusses the evidence base; gender as a key determinant of health; what we know about gendered structural determinants; norms, values, and practices; differences in exposure and vulnerability; the politics of the health care system; health research; and the way forward.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Female adolescents, Female children, Health care systems, International health, Men's health, Research, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2005. DES update: For you, your family, and your health care provider. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder includes information about diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen prescribed from 1938 to 1971 to women who experienced miscarriages or premature deliveries, and which was later discovered to pose a risk to women prescribed DES while pregnant and to both women and men exposed to DES in the womb. The binder provides information about what is known about DES, what is being learned about DES, and what can be done about DES. Additional resources are provided, as well.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, DES Update, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MS E-29, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/DES Available from the website.

Keywords: Diethylstilbestrol, Estrogens, Men's health, Pregnancy, Premature labor, Resource materials, Teratogens, Women's health

Kemper DW. 1999-. Healthwise handbook: A self care guide for you. Boise, ID: Healthwise, numerous editions

Annotation: This book, written for the general consumer, contains basic guidelines on how to recognize and cope with more than 180 of the most common health problems. The book discusses self-care basics, staying healthy, and self-care resources for the following general subject areas: 1) nutrition; 2) mental health; 3) fitness and relaxation; and 4) first aid and emergencies. The manual contains an index and a directory of resources. The book is available in English or Spanish.

Contact: Healthwise, 2601 North Bogus Basin Road, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone: (800) 706-9646 Web Site: http://www.healthwise.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 877930-71-7.

Keywords: Child health, Educational materials, First aid, Health promotion, Infant health, Men's health, Nutrition, Outreach, Risk prevention, Self care, Sexual health, Spanish language materials, Training materials, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preconception Health and Health Care Resource Center. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website provides tools and resources to advance the health of individuals of reproductive age. Materials and strategies are grouped into four categories: health education materials; clinical strategies and model programs; policy strategies and resources; and state and local strategies and model programs.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Health education, Health policy, Men's health, Model programs, Preconception care, Women's health

Texas Department of State Health Services, Office of Title V and Family Health. Someday starts now. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Office of Title V and Family Health,

Annotation: This website for the public campaign of the Healthy Texas Babies Initiative provides information and resources about preconception and preconception care for women, men, new parents and parents-to-be, health professionals, and communities, with the goal of reducing infant mortality in Texas. Contents include training videos to help professionals recognize opportunities to talk about aspects of the preconception period with their clients, as well as birth and life plan templates, posters, a client worksheet, and frequently asked questions. Additional contents include a life planning tool for women; a birth plan tool for parents-to-be; and a list of coalitions, campaign materials (public service announcements, a media toolkit, videos, web and mobile banners), and resource links for community stakeholders. The content is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Maternal and Child Health, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7321 Fax: (512) 458-7358 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/mch/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Family planning, Infant health, Men's health, Parents, Preconception care, Public awareness campaigns, Spanish language materials, State MCH programs, Texas, Women's health

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.