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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (1,151 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

Corruccini CG. n.d.. Eating right for your baby. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Health Services, Maternal and Child Health Branch, 17 pp. (Nutrition for pregnancy and breast feeding)

Annotation: One of four in a series, this brochure is meant as a guide for planning meals for pregnant women. It is organized by food groups and lists foods, amounts, and which vitamins and minerals are supplied when eaten. The other titles in the series are: Your Weight and Weight Gain; Using Vitamin/Mineral Pills and Salt; and Relief from Common Problems: Nausea, Constipation, Heartburn.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Price unknown.

Keywords: Menu planning, Nutritional requirements, Nutritive value, Prenatal nutrition

Panhandle Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Partners for a Healthy Baby mentoring and supervision curriculum. Tallahassee, FL: Panhandle Healthy Start Initiative, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document is an outline of the content and methodology of the mentoring and supervision curriculum used to train leadership individuals in home visiting. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Florida Panhandle Healthy Start, 1339 East Lafayette Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Telephone: (850) 922-1300 Fax: (850) 922-1352 E-mail: mgraham@mailer.fsu.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Curricula, Florida, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Infants, Mentors, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Supervision, Training materials

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. A sampling of outcome findings from interventions relevant to addressing barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, ca. 150 pp. (Technical assistance sampler)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide technical assistance to individuals working to improve student performance in American public schools. Examples of specific techniques that address barriers to student learning and data to support these techniques are highlighted within this document. Areas covered include (1) enhancing classroom-based efforts to enable learning, (2) providing student and family assistance, (3) responding to and preventing crises, (4) supporting transitions, (5) increasing home involvement in schooling, and (6) outreach for greater community involvement and support. [Support in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Community participation, Knowledge level, Learning, Mental health, Parent participation

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. Technical assistance sampler on: Using technology to address barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the use of technology to overcome barriers to learning. Topics include information systems management, multimedia aids to facilitate intervention, in situ and distance learning, and model programs and guides. A list of additional references is also included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Education, Information systems, Intervention, Learning, Mental health, Model programs, Technology

Wittenmyer J. n.d.. Amelioration of Health Problems of Children with Parents with Mental Retardation: [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, 51 pp.

Annotation: This project attempted to improve the health status of children in families in which one or both parents have mental retardation by reducing the risks associated with lack of immunization, poor nutrition, undiagnosed medical or developmental problems, injuries, and inadequate early stimulation. Efforts included both direct services (such as immunization, screening, and home care programs) and a consultation and technical assistance program aimed at improving the accessibility of the service delivery system for these children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-201051.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Barriers to Health Care, Health Education, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, Mental Retardation, Parents, Parents with disabilities, Preventive Health Care, Primary Care

Cataldo M. n.d.. Project ABLE - Altering Bowel Learning Effectively [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Kennedy Institute for Handicapped Children, 9 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the problem of fecal incontinence in children with myelomeningocele by developing an affordable instructional package for health care providers and a parent instruction program in order to help these children develop bowel control. Improvement was documented in half the children using this systematic home-based method. The training program included a videotape and written provider and parent manuals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152999.

Keywords: Bowel Control, Chronically Ill, Home-Based Health Care, Meningomyelocele, Parent Education Clinics, Spina Bifida Association, Spina Bifida Incontinence, Toilet Training

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

Susin J, Kaplan L. n.d.. "Breaking the Silence" tool kit: A how-to guide to bring mental illness education to schools in your community—A school outreach project. (Rev. ed.). Lake Success, NY: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 46 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit, geared toward program facilitators and volunteer educators, provides methods for bringing the Breaking the Silence program to communities. The purpose of the program is to break the silence about mental illness in schools. The toolkit provides a background on Breaking the Silence, the rationale for mental illness education, information about how to organize and fund a local program, how to enlist and train volunteers, and materials documenting the success of Breaking the Silence. The program is intended for use in upper elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.

Contact: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 1981 Marcus Avenue, C-117, Lake Success, NY 11042, Telephone: (516) 326-0797 Secondary Telephone: (718) 347-7284 Fax: (516) 437-5785 E-mail: namiqn@aol.com Web Site: http://www.nami.org/MSTemplate.cfm?MicrositeID=241 Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Communities, Health education, Mental disorders, Mental health, Resource materials, Schools, Training

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. n.d.. Helping children cope during deployment. Bethesda, MD: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2 pp. (Courage to care)

Annotation: This fact sheet, which is geared toward parents and family caregivers, contains information to help children cope during a parent's deployment. The fact sheet presents commonly asked questions and their responses. General tips for communicating with children of all ages, as well as advice for communicating with children from age 3 through adolescents according to their ages, are also included.

Contact: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (800) 515-5257 E-mail: webmaster@usuhs.gov Web Site: http://www.usuhs.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Child mental health, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Coping, Families, Military, Parent child relations, Parents

Rutgers Occupational Training and Education Consortium. n.d.. Trauma training: Child development, trauma and the brain—The DYFS mental health screening program. Buhl, ID: National Family Preservation Network,

Annotation: This website links to a training guide and participant workbook that provide activities that focus on trauma as a way of understanding how children and adolescents in the child welfare system are especially vulnerable to mental health challenges. The training materials were developed to help providers think about the physical effects of trauma on children, adolescents and young adults; understand the biological underpinnings of their challenges; and identify children with a suspected mental health need. Included are activities to help providers administer the New Jersey Mental Health Screening Tool (MHST) to assist with identifying children who may have mental health need and require further assessment.

Contact: National Family Preservation Network, 3971 North 1400 East, Buhl, Idaho 83316, Telephone: (888) 498-9047 E-mail: director@nfpn.org Web Site: http://nfpn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children's mental health, Interventions, New Jersey, Screening, State programs, Training, Trauma

National Center for Social Statistics. n.d.. Statistical summary of patients served in mental retardation clinics, fiscal year 1969. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Social and Rehabilitation Service, National Center for Social Statistics, 7 items. (NCSS report MR-1 (FY 69))

Annotation: This document provides data on services rendered to mentally retarded children in fiscal year 1969 by clinics supported in whole or in part by federal grants under Title V of the Social Security Act. The library also holds instructions and forms for reporting similar data in other years (1956, 1960, and 1974).

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: NCSS Report MR-1 (FY 69).

Keywords: Children, Clinics, Mental retardation, State programs, Statistics, Title V programs

Partnership for Male Youth. n.d.. The Partnership for Male Youth: Health provider toolkit for adolescent and young adult males. Washington, DC: Partnership for Male Youth, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help health professionals address the unique health care needs of adolescents and young adult males (AYAs) ages 10 to 26. Contents include a checklist covering nine health domains; client interview questions and supporting materials for each domain including background information, practice tools, and references; and a video library containing presentations for continuing medical education and client education. Topics include healthy eating and physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, trauma, mental health, developmental disorders, sexual biologic basics, normal pubertal concerns and genital abnormalities, and labs and immunizations. A tutorial is also available.

Contact: Partnership for Male Youth, 900 Second Street, N.E., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20002, E-mail: barbour@partnershipformaleyouth.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipformaleyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Comprehensive health care, Continuing medical education, Evidence based health care, Health examinations, Immunizations, Interviews, Medical history taking, Men's health, Screening, Young adults

Postpartum Progress. n.d.. Clinical tools for postpartum depression. [no place]: Postpartum Progress, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for clinicians involved in the care of pregnant and postpartum women include position papers, algorithms, toolkits, guidelines for treatment, screening tools, research on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, professional organizations, training and continuing education, books, and other resources. Information and peer support for pregnant and new moms with postpartum depression and other mental illnesses related to pregnancy and childbirth are also available from the website.

Contact: Postpartum Progress, E-mail: postpartumprogress@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.postpartumprogress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Mental disorders, Mental health, Perinatal bereavement, Perinatal health, Perinatal influences, Postpartum care, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Puerperal disorders, Resources for professionals, Women's health

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Mom! Dad! Ask the doctor about my emotional development, too!. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 12 items.

Annotation: These advertising materials promote the importance of mental health as part of a health supervision visit. They are designed to be displayed on a bulletin board or used as a table top display in a pediatric practice. One version focuses on young children and the other on teenagers. Both versions are available in English and Spanish. Other versions are provided for use on Facebook pages or in parent newsletters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Pediatric care, Public awareness materials, Social interaction

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Helping children in foster care make successful transitions into child care. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics , 2 pp.

National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness. n.d.. Health tips for families series. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness, 13 items.

Annotation: These fact sheets for families in Head Start programs cover a variety of health topics related to children. Topics include active play, health literacy, understanding and using health information, healthy breathing at home (asthma prevention), healthy eating, mental health, oral health, and safety and injury prevention. The materials are available in Amharic, Arabic, Armenian, Burmese, Chinese, English, Hmong, Marshallese, Polish, Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Yiddish.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Child safety, Consumer education materials, Families, Head Start, Health literacy, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Physical activity, Play, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Young children

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2019. Intensive care coordination for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders: State and community profiles. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 435 pp.

Annotation: This document updates a 2014 profiles report, by (1) categorizing states' intensive care coordination (ICC) efforts into sustainability, implementation or pre-implementation groups; (2) identifying key informants; and (3) expanding the questionnaire template used in surveying the states. This updated profiles report is intended to assist states interested in improving outcomes for children and youth with complex mental and substance use disorders by developing or revamping ICC. includes lessons learned from 40 states and a small number of local jurisdictions that have implemented ICC, with and without high quality Wraparound, and is intended to support innovation around state efforts.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: PEP19-04-01-001..

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Mental disorders, Mental health services, Service coordination, State programs, Substance abuse, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.