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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Jeronimo J, Castle PE, Temin S, Denny L, Gupta V, Kim JJ, Luciani S, Murokora D, Ngoma T, Qiao Y, Quinn M, Sankaranarayanan R, Sasieni P, Schmeler KM, Shastri SS. 2016. Secondary prevention of cervical cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology resource-staffed clinical practice guidelines. Journal of Global Oncology [published online before print October 28, 2016],

Annotation: This guideline for health professionals, public health authorities, policymakers, and laypersons in all settings offers guidance on secondary prevention of cervical cancer. Contents include key recommendations for screening; triage; and treatment of women with precursor lesions. Recommendations for special populations, such as women who are HIV positive, immunosuppressed, pregnant, postpartum, or women who have had hysterectomies are also addressed. Topics include developing infrastructure for HPV testing, diagnosis, and treatment in settings without current mass screening; cost and policy implications, guideline implementation, and future directions.

Contact: American Society of Clinical Oncology, 2318 Mill Road, Suite 800, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (571) 483-1300 Fax: (703) 299-1044 E-mail: asco@asco.org Web Site: http://www.asco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Cervical cancer, DNA testing, Diagnosis, Disease prevention, Human papillomavirus, International health, Medical treatment, Oral cancer, Oral health, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Primary care, Triage, Women's health

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

Moses K, Klebonis J. 2015. Designing Medicaid health homes for individuals with opioid dependency: Considerations for states. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights key features of approved health home models in Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont that are tailored to individuals with opioid dependency. It identifies important considerations in developing opioid dependence-focused health homes, including: (1) leveraging opioid treatment program requirements; (2) promoting collaboration across multiple state agencies; (3) supporting providers in transforming into health homes; and (4) ecnouraging information sharing.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Maryland, Medical homes, Rhode Island, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment services, Vermont

National Center for Medical Home Implementation, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health. [2013]. The role of the medical home in vision and eye health: A fact sheet for medical professionals. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for health professional provides information about the role the medical home plays in ensuring that children receive timely eye examinations; vision screenings; and, when necessary, eye examinations and treatment for vision conditions. The fact sheet discusses common eye problems in preschool-age children, the importance of educating families about vision milestones, guidelines for vision screening, and benefits of early vision screening and eye examinations in the medical home. Links to resources for more information are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eye diseases, Families, Medical home, Resource materials, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Daly M. 2011. Colorado Medical Home Initiative and its impact on school-based health centers. [Denver, CO]: Colorado Association for School-Based Health Care, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides background information about the medical home and medical-home-related legislation in Colorado, with an emphasis on the Colorado Medical Home Initiative and how it has impacted school-based health centers. Other topics discussed include Colorado medical home standards, who is eligible to become a certified medical home provider, compensation, the Colorado medical home certification process, definitions, resources available to certified medical home providers, and pros and cons of becoming a certified medical home.

Contact: Colorado Association of School-Based Health Centers, 1801 Wiliams Street, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80218, Telephone: (303) 399-6380 Fax: (303) 350-4296 E-mail: info@casbhc.org Web Site: http://www.casbhc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Child health, Colorado, Health professionals, Initiatives, Legislation, Medicaid, Medical home, Prevention, Reimbursement, School health, State iniatitives, Treatment

Meyers D, Peikes D, Lundquist DS, Genevro J. 2011. Improving evaluations of the medical home. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 4 pp. (Patient-Centered Medical Home Decisionmaker Brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights six key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the patient-centered medical home model. Contents include the rationale and examples in practice for each recommendation. The brief accompanies a white paper on this topic, which is also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0091.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

Peikes D, Dale S, Lundquist E, Genevro J, Meyers D. 2011. Building the evidence base for the medical home: What sample and sample size do studies need?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 46 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides suggestions for generating evidence on the effects of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The paper focuses on quantitative evaluations designed to measure effectiveness. Topics include accounting for clustering inherent in effectiveness research, determining what effect sizes a given study can expect to detect, approximating the number of clients and practices required to detect policy-relevant yet achievable effects, and varying the outcomes and types of clients included in the analyses to improve a study's ability to detect true effects. An accompanying brief highlights key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the PCMH model.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0100-EF.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

US Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2009. Title V MCH federal/state partnership meeting: Make Change Happen—Investing in Healthy Families Across the Lifespan [participant's notebook]. [Rockville, MD]: US Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 v.

Annotation: This participant's notebook contains information from the Title V MCH federal/state partnership meeting: Make Change Happen—Investing in Healthy Families Across the Lifespan, which took place on October 25-27, 2009, in Washington, DC. Contents include the agenda; goals and objectives; a participant list, partnership committee list, and speaker list; session information; select maternal and child health publications; and information about resource centers. Sessions covered transition from pediatric to adult primary care for youth with special health care needs; depression in parents, parenting, and children; integrating health equity, social determinants, and the life course perspective; resilience of women living with health conditions, health reform and its impact on MCH programs and populations; care coordination and the medical home; MCH obesity; improving birth outcomes; and child and adolescent injury and death.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Conference proceedings, Costs, Depression, Families, Financing, Medical home, Obesity, Parenting skills, Prevention, Primary care, Primary care, Programs, Safety, Service coordination, Social Security Act, Title V, Social factors, Treatment, Unintentional injuries, Women's health

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2009. Models of care for children and youth with special health care needs: Promising models for transforming California's system of care. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a range of models of care for children and youth with special health care needs that the Lucille Packard Foundation for Children's Health can review and discuss as a starting point for mapping out a strategy to support a transformation of the system of care. The report discusses models of care, the importance of integrated services, the medical home, care coordination, cultural competence, family-centered care and family involvement, transition, palliative and respite care, financing of care, and health information technology.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Cultural competence, Families, Health care systems, Medical home, Palliative treatment, Respite care, Service coordination, Service integration, Transition to independent living

Congressional Quarterly. 2000. Issues in health policy: Selections from the CQ Researcher. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 239 pp.

Annotation: This reader is a compilation of 12 recent articles from the CQ Researcher, a weekly policy brief that brings into focus issues on the public agenda. The collection is organized into three subject areas: (1) illness, treatment and health policy (which includes chapters of Alzheimer's disease, obesity and health, childhood depression, asthma, and vaccine controversies); (2) policy in a managed-care environment (which includes chapters on patients' rights, managing managed care, and medical mistakes; and (3) the future of health policy (which includes chapters on embryo research, humane genome research, the global AIDS crisis, and computers and medicine). Each chapter includes endnotes and a bibliography. The compilation also includes credits and an index.

Contact: C Q Press, 1255 22nd Street, N.W. Suite 400, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: 1-866-4CQ-PRESS (427-7737) Secondary Telephone: (202) 729-1800 Fax: 1-800-380-3810 E-mail: customerservice@cqpress.com Web Site: http://www.cqpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-56802-633-1.

Keywords: AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, Asthma, Child health, Computers, Depression, Genomics, Health, Health policy, Immunization, Managed care, Medical errors, Obesity, Patient rights, Research, Treatment

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.